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Old April 13, 2013, 07:21 PM   #1
Tmitch
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Check Your Scale

Do any of you reloaders have a weight gage set to check your scale and powder measure?
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Old April 13, 2013, 07:25 PM   #2
Nathan
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Yes, I have the Lyman set. I consider it key to safety!
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Old April 13, 2013, 07:41 PM   #3
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I use a RCBS check weight set to verify my scales accuracy.
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Old April 13, 2013, 07:44 PM   #4
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Most electronic scales come with a calibration weight.
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Old April 13, 2013, 08:41 PM   #5
jepp2
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Quote:
Yes, I have the Lyman set. I consider it key to safety!
Same here, I use the set to check my balance beam scale. Now that I have added an electronic scale, I use the calibration weights to check it.
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Old April 13, 2013, 09:28 PM   #6
Beagle333
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I use my check weights every time I set up my scale again for loading. And if I'm away from the scale for any length of time (longer than it takes to eat a sammich), I drop the check weights on there once again before I start loading again.
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Old April 13, 2013, 09:38 PM   #7
Brian Pfleuger
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Check Your Scale

I always calibrate my scale every time it powers up. I see no need for any further check weights.
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Old April 13, 2013, 09:39 PM   #8
BillM
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I guess I'm a belt and suspenders guy---my electronic scale
came with calibration weights and I verify the calibration with
my RCBS check weight set.
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Old April 13, 2013, 09:40 PM   #9
hgmeyer
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+1 for calibrating
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Old April 13, 2013, 09:43 PM   #10
Sport45
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Quote:
I guess I'm a belt and suspenders guy---my electronic scale
came with calibration weights and I verify the calibration with
my RCBS check weight set.
Same here. It's much faster to drop a check weight in the pan than it is toi re-calibrate in the middle of a session.
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Old April 14, 2013, 06:56 AM   #11
lah2420
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Learned my lesson the hard way. Had to unload around 400 rounds due to not using a set of scale weights. Used the Lyman set to check when my brain finally started functioning correctly.
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Old April 14, 2013, 07:25 AM   #12
Nathan
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BillM, you hit the nail on the head!

Quote:
Most electronic scales come with a calibration weight.
The smallest weight with those is usually 10 gms. How does that compare to your load weight of ~40 grains (for me last night)?
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Old April 14, 2013, 08:12 AM   #13
Brian Pfleuger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan
The smallest weight with those is usually 10 gms. How does that compare to your load weight of ~40 grains (for me last night)?
The laws of physics pretty much require it. The scales work by measuring the voltage change across a piece of metal when weight is applied. So long as the metal isn't stressed beyond it's flex point, the equation will always be correct. If it's correct at those two weights, it will be correct at all weights within it's range, within the margin of error.

Besides that, what reloading room isn't stocked with hundreds, if not thousands of "check weights"? I've got bullets from 32 to 200 grains. Cases from around 75 to 175 grains. And the most obvious of all, the powder pan. It's a CONSTANT check weight, used every single time I weigh something. The scale reads -165.5 when the pan is removed and 0 when it's put back.
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Old April 14, 2013, 08:41 AM   #14
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If you are checking by using a weight, you need to use at least two weights. One light and one heavier. This checks accuracy across a range. This is called linearity. You could be on at one point and drift off at another.
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Old April 14, 2013, 10:47 AM   #15
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And chronograph to make sure.
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Old April 14, 2013, 10:52 AM   #16
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Good point.

Quote:
If you are checking by using a weight, you need to use at least two weights. One light and one heavier. This checks accuracy across a range. This is called linearity. You could be on at one point and drift off at another.
Excellent point; At least two, three is better and we routinely used a five point check on critical applications. ...

Be Safe !!!
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Old April 14, 2013, 10:57 AM   #17
Brian Pfleuger
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High quality digital scales generally perform a 3 point calibration... 0, mid-range (often 750gr) and max-weight (often 1,500gr)

Last edited by Brian Pfleuger; April 14, 2013 at 11:09 AM.
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Old April 14, 2013, 04:41 PM   #18
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I think you are safest with a check weight that is close to the charge weight that you will be throwing. I made-up a set with a lab scale a long time ago, and use them religiously, ESPECIALLY for those light charge weights like 4.0 grains, when they are max.

That helps me check drift as well as calibration during the reloading process.

Counting on electronics doesn't seem to be as good a bet. There are more things that can go wrong than the physics of the load cell.

Even with a beam scale, bumping one of the weights just a tad can make more than a 0.1 grain difference if it comes out of the notch a bit.

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Old April 14, 2013, 04:52 PM   #19
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I use 2 weights before i start loading everytime to be on the safe side.
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Old April 14, 2013, 10:40 PM   #20
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without exception

Quote:
I use my check weights every time I set up my scale again for loading. And if I'm away from the scale for any length of time (longer than it takes to eat a sammich), I drop the check weights on there once again before I start loading again.
I rely on my RCBS 505 balance scale and a Lyman Weight Check set.
I have learned to trust nothing else in my reloading shop.
I use these devices to confirm the charge weights my nine measures throw.
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Old April 15, 2013, 06:49 PM   #21
fshfindr
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g=grams

A penny is 2.5 or 3.11g
A nickel is 5.0g
A dime is 2.27g
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Old April 15, 2013, 07:01 PM   #22
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check before and after

I check at the beginning and end of each session for sure figuring what is inbetween should be right.

I don't sit more than about an hour at a time so that means at most I risk 200 rounds.

If I ever start up and have a problem, then I would know to go back upstream to check the previous boxes.

I also mark each box so I can trace back if needed.
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Old April 15, 2013, 11:16 PM   #23
Farmland
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I have a check weight but never use it. Instead I use three things. I double check the weight by using my digital then checking it with the balance bean scale. Then I have a powder check on the progressive that will let me know of any dangerous changes.

I will note that in 20 years the digital and balance beam have always agreed.

I don't have an explanation why I do it this way, I just do.
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Old April 16, 2013, 05:39 AM   #24
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yes i do, I use the one that came with my scale, Frankfort Arsenal scale.
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Old April 16, 2013, 02:55 PM   #25
schmellba99
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Quote:
I always calibrate my scale every time it powers up. I see no need for any further check weights.
This. My RCBS has two 50 gram weights to use during startup calibration. It checks 0 grams, 50 grams and 100 grams. I know exactly what the powder pan weighs as well as a check, but have never had any issues.
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