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Old April 6, 2013, 03:35 PM   #1
CommissarHark
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Uberti Revolving Carbine Question

I recently purchased a pair of Uberti Cattleman's Carbine, the Remington C&B variety, for my Fiance and I. We decided to convert them to cartridge loading, with Kirst gated conversions. I decided to go one step further though and purchased several, UBM Rail sections from NC Star. with a short vertical grip, red dot sight, and flashlight/laser combo mounted on it it looks quite cool and tasticlised (Probably butchered that one), but I'm worried about taking it to the range for one big reason; Gas Cutting. I've read about the dangers of it, how you have to hold revolvers the right way, and even had it mentioned by Mike Bellevue on his youtube channel specifically for this carbine. What my question is, is since my arm and hand are well away from the front of the cylinder, and the forcing cone, as the vertical grip has my arm at an obtuse angle, should I be fine so as long as I have sleeves on or should I think about investing in a pair of bracers? (I have a friend in the SCA who could get me a good pair, maybe even with reinforcement if necessary.) Any help would be appreciated.
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Old April 6, 2013, 05:13 PM   #2
IDAHOMIKE
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I don't know how anxious Id be to find out. If your shooting BP loaded rounds, I imagine it could get exciting. With sleeves and limited use, it may be fine, Im not sure. I must say though that some pic of the gun with accessories would be fun to see.
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Old April 6, 2013, 05:26 PM   #3
Newton24b
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the government troops using the revolving rifles discovereed they needed heavy duty leather gloves with elbow length gauntlets.
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Old April 6, 2013, 06:08 PM   #4
rep1954
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Many years ago I purchased one of the 1858 Remington Carbines and took it to the range for it's first time. I got it all loaded and went to shoot it. I cocked it and then fired it and then I couldn't hear anymore. In the excitement I forgot to put on my head gear. For 3 days I couldn't forget what happened. You don't want your ears that close to a cylinder being fired without protected ears.
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Old April 6, 2013, 06:30 PM   #5
DaleA
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Hmmm...since it's a concern I think I might head over to the thrift store and see if I could get anything cheap, long sleeved and leather.

After one shooting session I'd check the sleeve and then go from there.
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Old April 6, 2013, 07:13 PM   #6
burrhead
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You'll want a welding jacket.
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Old April 6, 2013, 08:15 PM   #7
CommissarHark
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@ everyone who said anything about lighting my arms on fire or burning myself : Well I've got welding gloves that I can use to test, and maybe my barn jacket would be enough to cover the arms just in case. I'll have to give it a go and see.

@IDAHOMIKE: I'm using smokeless loads. I'll post some pictures once I get it all finished up. I'm waiting on a few more rail sections, and I need to get my hands on some tapping bits, and my uncles drill press. I want to do that fix where you use a set screw to hold the cylinder pin in place so you don't need the loading lever.

@rep1954: Don't worry I'd never shoot without covered ears.
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Old April 6, 2013, 08:43 PM   #8
DPris
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I've worked with a cartridge version.
Keep your hands behind the B/C gap.
If you're trying to be "tactical" it's a bad idea.
If you're just playing, see Line 2.
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Old April 7, 2013, 08:33 AM   #9
DWFan
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These carbines don't have a forehand for a reason. Either train to use them one-handed, as they were meant, or wrap both hands around the grip.
The Rossi Circuit Judge revolver carbines have a blast shield at the end of the cylinder.
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Old April 7, 2013, 04:32 PM   #10
bedbugbilly
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I don't know if I'm fully understanding what the OP is trying to do - but these were designed (if I am remembering correctly - or at least ones made years ago) with a spur on the trigger guard to use you other hand to support the carbine when firing. It isn't so much the side flash of the individual charge going off - if you are firing it with the standard method of loading it (i.e. like a cap and ball pistol - not a cartridge conversion) you run the risk as with any C & B revolver of a "chain fire". If you have a hand in front of that cylinder and it chain fires, you probably are going to suffer some substantial damage to your hand - not to mention the possible loss of fingers. Keep your hands where they belong - behind the cylinder. The loading lever is not intended to be used as a "forearm".
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Old April 7, 2013, 05:19 PM   #11
SIGSHR
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I have fired a Colt 1861 Army with a shoulder stock, the support hand goes BEHIND the B/C gap. Most comfortable position for me is on top of the shooting hand.
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Old April 7, 2013, 06:31 PM   #12
Aguila Blanca
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Another comment from the Department of Redundancy Department: Don't try to use a foregrip or anything else that puts your hand or arm in line with or ahead of the barrel-cylinder gap.
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