The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 22, 2013, 09:36 PM   #1
ChasingWhitetail91
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 10, 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 336
painting an aluminum reciever?

I have an older Sears and Roebuck pump 12 ga. which has a very rough looking aluminum reciever. Wondering if anyone has ever re-finished one, and if I could get away with using an etching primer and some hi-temp stove or engine paint?
__________________
Abraham Lincoln made all men free, Samuel Colt made them equal.
ChasingWhitetail91 is offline  
Old March 22, 2013, 10:09 PM   #2
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 16,837
Get some spray & bake paint from Brownell's.
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is offline  
Old March 22, 2013, 10:32 PM   #3
Clark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 4, 1999
Location: WA, the ever blue state
Posts: 2,954
I have some Alumna hide II paint from Brownells that says it has to be at least 65 degrees.

The wife will not let me paint MY stuff in the house.

I have been waiting 6 months for it to warm up enough.

Don't paint over nite sites.... like me
__________________
The word 'forum" does not mean "not criticizing books."
"Ad hominem fallacy" is not the same as point by point criticism of books. If you bought the book, and believe it all, it may FEEL like an ad hominem attack, but you might strive to accept other points of view may exist.
Are we a nation of competing ideas, or a nation of forced conformity of thought?
Clark is offline  
Old March 23, 2013, 10:52 AM   #4
Mac's!
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 15, 2001
Posts: 129
The best way to prep it, is to etch the surface by abrasive blasting. Use a lower air pressure, keep the nozzle about 6 inches away from the surface and keep the nozzle moving. If it's to close and not moving around, it can "eat" a scallop in the surface. After it's done, give it a few minutes soak in Alodine. Then wash it with soapy water. A hair dryer will work for drying it and it's ready for painting.

The Alodine will give it a nasty yellow look but it's a good prep on Aluminum for under paint. Depending on who you talk to: It's almost as hard as regular Anodizing, it's just as hard or it's a little bit harder. Keep yer powder dry, Mac.
Tuff-Gun Finishes. The Name Says It All.
Mac's Shootin' Irons
http://www.shootiniron.com
Mac's! is offline  
Old March 23, 2013, 03:32 PM   #5
ChasingWhitetail91
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 10, 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 336
Would I still need to use an etching primer or a spray blaster if I went with a Brownells product?
__________________
Abraham Lincoln made all men free, Samuel Colt made them equal.
ChasingWhitetail91 is offline  
Old March 23, 2013, 06:18 PM   #6
Dfariswheel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2001
Posts: 6,824
Not necessarily, but you get a better bond if you bead blast first. This gives the metal a "tooth" for the coating to bond to and increases durability.

However, you can get an excellent job as long as you get the metal totally clean.
Brownell's sell Aluma-Hyde II which requires no baking and air cures to a durable finish.
When cleaning, be wary of using any of the super strong liquid cleaners like Simply Green or Greased Lightning. These will attack aluminum and can do serious damage rather quickly.

If you consider bead blasting, be very careful about the blaster setup. If it's been used to blast carbon steel, like car parts, the pressure will embed tiny particles of steel into the aluminum and the carbon steel can rust later, ruining the surface.
I once had a custom who bead blasted an aluminum pistol frame in a garage blaster and was astounded when his aluminum gun started rusting.

So, if you do a good prep and clean job, the Brownell's aluminum finish will do a very nice job as long as you do yours.
Dfariswheel is offline  
Old March 24, 2013, 06:01 PM   #7
mshpx645
Member
 
Join Date: December 27, 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 19
I've done a mini 14, mini 30, and a SKS with Brownells Alumi-hyde and all 3 turned out great. Did them 5-6 years ago and still wearing really good. I did touch up the bolts on them as it was coming off there this past summer. Just clean real good, I used 90% rubbing alcohol. Really is simple to do. If you get it, get the extra plastic nozzles also, they plug up quickly.
mshpx645 is offline  
Old March 27, 2013, 11:36 AM   #8
ChasingWhitetail91
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 10, 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 336
I have a friend who offered to sand blast the reciever for me, but I cannot find the reason if any why you would want to bead blast it instead of sand blast it. I'm assuming its the chance that you could gouge or punch through the aluminum, but my friend has been using it alot lately and assures me he has worked on much thinner aluminum without any issues. Anyone ever try a sand blaster, and if not why?
__________________
Abraham Lincoln made all men free, Samuel Colt made them equal.
ChasingWhitetail91 is offline  
Old March 27, 2013, 02:03 PM   #9
Dfariswheel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2001
Posts: 6,824
A real sand blaster that uses sand is too rough and too aggressive.
Most gun blasters use glass beads or other abrasive media that can be selected for the metal and the type finish desired.

In addition, bead blasting is more controllable.
You could probably use a sand blaster, but be very careful and test it on a small area.
Dfariswheel is offline  
Old March 28, 2013, 02:11 PM   #10
guncrank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 15, 2006
Location: Fern Creek ,KY and Metro Louisville at large
Posts: 318
I use 100 grit aluminum oxide and about 40/60 psi to blast receivers /parts and hold the gun back and do not blast in one area to long.

Clean base metal is required for the paint to stick more than the tooth of the blast.
__________________
CW Shooters Supply Inc
1-866-217-5990
Machine Shop and Finishing Services to the trade and public
guncrank is offline  
Old March 28, 2013, 04:13 PM   #11
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 11,445
Blasting may pit the metal. My advice is to get a sheet of 100 grit wet-dry silicon carbide paper and attach it to a flat surface, then grain the side of the receiver from front to back in a straight line. When you have removed any pits or scratches, move to 150 grit and repeat. Wipe the part with mineral spirits or denatured alcohol (not rubbing alcohol) and apply the finish. Alumahyde works well, as does the Brownells' bake-on lacquer finish, or get a can of Brownells' Gun-Kote in the color of your choice.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old March 28, 2013, 04:15 PM   #12
ChasingWhitetail91
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 10, 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 336
Thanks for the advice, I think i'm going to try the paper first just to be on the safe side.
__________________
Abraham Lincoln made all men free, Samuel Colt made them equal.
ChasingWhitetail91 is offline  
Old March 28, 2013, 08:44 PM   #13
guncrank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 15, 2006
Location: Fern Creek ,KY and Metro Louisville at large
Posts: 318
Gunkote
Cerrokote
Durakote
All recommend abrasive blasting for maximum adhesion.
That includes alunimum.

You don't blast long and use less psi.
__________________
CW Shooters Supply Inc
1-866-217-5990
Machine Shop and Finishing Services to the trade and public
guncrank is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09060 seconds with 9 queries