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Old November 11, 2016, 09:05 PM   #1
robmkivseries70
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M1911 trigger and striker fired pistol transition

Hi All,
I am a long time 1911 shooter ca 1970 or so. Today at the range I was shooting my Ruger SR9e and didn't release the trigger enough for a reset. I know what the implications are for CCW/ self defense work, but I really like the notion of 17 rounds of 9mm or 15 rounds of .40 S&W available in the striker fired pistols. Has anyone been through this and were you able to train yourself out of the problem?
Thanks,
Rob
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Old November 11, 2016, 10:14 PM   #2
James K
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I am going to make two assumptions here. First is that there is no burr or anything else that could cause the problem, and second that you didn't work on the pistol and cause the problem yourself.

That condition can happen with any pistol, including a 1911. Assuming no other problem, the answer is training and practice.

I can't resist pointing out that once you get "grooved in" to the new pistol and decide to make it your primary defense handgun that you set the 1911 aside. Some folks claim that they can pick up any gun and somehow "instinctively" know which gun they have and how it works so they could never make a mistake even under stress; I remain a skeptic.

Jim
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Old November 11, 2016, 11:25 PM   #3
robmkivseries70
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Hi Jim,
Yep, thats pretty much spot on as they say. Had it been a 1911 I wouldn't have had a problem. It was a trigger reset issue because the reset on the 1911 is so wonderfully short. ie Human error. That kind of stoppage in a fight could have serious implications. I wanted to see if other shooters had a different solution. The line about defaulting to ones level of training is true. In this case, the range was crowded so I was stuck at the 25 yd. line. instead of a more practical distance of 7 yards or less. More practice will tell the tale, thanks for confirming my thoughts.
Best,
Rob

ETA More info.
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Old November 11, 2016, 11:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Some folks claim that they can pick up any gun and somehow "instinctively" know which gun they have and how it works so they could never make a mistake even under stress; I remain a skeptic.
I too remain a skeptic about that, especially as I have personal experience in that regard. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that I will NOT make a mistake (even under stress) with a gun that I KNOW WELL.

The trick, of course is to know well, any, and every gun that could be in your hands.

And the level of familiarity & practice THAT takes will vary with each person. IF they even achieve it...

I got a very clear personal lesson about this, fortunately one where no harm was done, many decades ago. (storytime)

A friend showed up, said he had seen a deer up the canyon. All he had with him was his Browning Sweet 16 and birdshot. Wanted to borrow a rifle. OK.

Dragged me along, toting his shotgun (was also pheasant season). No sign of the deer at all. On the way back, jumped a pheasant. I mounted the gun, punched off the safety and pulled the trigger. Nichts.
Punched off the safety and pulled the trigger again. Nada.
Punched off the safety and pulled the trigger a third time. Nothing, as the bird sailed out of sight.

My Winchester Model 12, that I had been shooting since I was 16 has the safety at the FRONT of the trigger guard.
The Browning safety is at the REAR.

Now, a flushing bird is not the stress of self defense, but it is stress/excitement, and I think the principle still holds.

IF I had been holding the gun I was used to (years of use) I would have made the shot. My actions were "on autopilot" and totally correct for my Winchester.

Totally wrong for his Browning.

I hope you see the point.
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Old November 12, 2016, 08:01 AM   #5
g.willikers
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The best way I've found for being able to switch around between different types of guns is to take them both (all) to the range every time.
Practice at least 50 rounds with each every range day, but no more than five to ten rounds at a time.
Then repeat with the next one.
Sooner or later they will all become second nature.
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