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Old March 21, 2013, 11:42 AM   #1
Dennis6474
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Would you reload these

I picked up some .243 brass at the flea market that was pretty tarnished but was supposed to be sized and primed. Some primers were Federal some CCI. The problem is that some of the brass are indented between the shoulder and the neck. Some of the dents are pretty deep. The dents do not stop the brass from going into the chamber.

My question is - would you reload them and count on fire-forming to fix the case dent or throw them away? Brass is hard to find and I need all I can get, however, I don't want any problems and I suppose I should just toss them.
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Old March 21, 2013, 11:52 AM   #2
dahermit
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In most instances of dents, they are of no concern...pictures would have helped.
Lube dents in strait-walled rifle cases (45-70, 444 Marlin, etc.), are common and somewhat difficult to avoid with oil (wet), lubes. Over application of lube on bottle-neck cases are possible via over-lubing them also. In that situation they are harmless and disappear on firing.
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Old March 21, 2013, 12:50 PM   #3
schmellba99
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Unless it is some kind of monster dent, no issue for me. I sized a bunch of brass once and somehow managed to get a grain of walnut tumbling media in my sizing die (obviously from one of the cases). It left a very noticeable dent on the shoulder of the brass. All brass fired without a hiccup, and I couldn't tell you which brass it was anymore.

Brass does not have to be perfect to function perfectly.
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Old March 21, 2013, 01:40 PM   #4
g.willikers
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Probably the worst that would happen is a loss of accuracy due to the irregular case shape in the chamber.
And self correcting when fired.
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Old March 21, 2013, 02:32 PM   #5
Dennis6474
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Thanks everybody. As hard as brass is to find now days I hated to throw it away.
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