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Old March 15, 2013, 08:02 AM   #1
CurbKid
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Mauser 98K Sniper rifle

According to Wikipedia there are approximately 132,000 sniper versions of the 98k. Does anyone know how to identify the sniper version from the regular version? There has to be some type of marking or serial number to identify the sniper version.
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Old March 15, 2013, 12:37 PM   #2
tahunua001
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side mount scope rail... that's about the only way I know of telling... if it has a weaver 2 piece or leupold 1 piece rail then it is a fake...
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Old March 15, 2013, 01:41 PM   #3
emcon5
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The first rule of buying a K98 sniper is that it is the most faked collectable rifle there is. If it is for sale, assume it is fake, unless there is really compelling evidence otherwise.

I was trying to sort out the different variations of K98 snipers, and came up empty, so I bought Law's Backbone of the Wehrmacht, Vol. II: Sniper Variations of the German K98k Rifle. Good book, with a staggering volume of detail.

Here is a general overview from the book:

Short side rail 1937 Some SS used snipers were conversions of G98s, later made by Berlin-L├╝becker Maschinenfabrik, Mauser Oberndorf and JP Sauer & Sohn

Low & High turret 1939, High vs low was evidently determined by the availability and variation of commercial optics. Some scopes needed to sit higher to clear the bolt handle. Early examples made by Army Ordinance offices, later produced Mauser Oberndorf and JP Sauer & Sohn

Long side rail 1943, developed by JP Sauer & Sohn with thicker receiver wall, produced primarily by Gustloff-Werke

Single & Double claw Both introduced in 1943, primarily used by Waffen SS, who made their own sniper rifles.

Swept back/ZF4 1945, attempt to standardize on the Zf4 scope originally designed for G43. They didn't get far before the war ended.

ZF41 Not intended as a sniper rifle, more of a designated marksman's rifle, with a low powered, long eye relief scope mounted above the rear sight with a side rail. They ended up serving as sniper rifles in some cases by necessity, due to a shortage of proper sniper rifles and scopes.

To further confuse things, there are several variations of each along the way.
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Old March 15, 2013, 03:20 PM   #4
bksfirearmsllc
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I have heard that the germans also used a 98 version in 22 cal. ? is this true or just a made up story? anyone have info on these if they existed?
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Old March 15, 2013, 05:38 PM   #5
tahunua001
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somehow it seems as if the 1903A4 is the most faked sniper of the period...
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Old March 15, 2013, 09:35 PM   #6
James K
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The Germans used several bolt action .22 rifles made up to resemble the K.98k military rifle. They were used by the Hitler Youth and other party organizations as trainers. They are desireable collector items as well as quite practical .22 rifles.

There were also sub-caliber adapters for the standard rifle; these were probably used for indoor rifle practice in inclement weather. They are quite rare and valuable.

Jim
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