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Old March 7, 2013, 03:28 PM   #1
2ndsojourn
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Sig P250 quirk

I bought my girlfriend a Sig 250 for her birthday. (With the thinking that if she wanted to upgrade it to a 9mm when she gets more comfortable shooting she could move up easily. Plus after handling a few 380's she liked that one. Whether that line of thinking was rational is neither here nor there.)

Anyway, the rear of the notch on the slide that catches the slide release is cut at a slight angle toward the front of the slide making the release of the slide, when locked back, difficult for her skinny thumb(s). All of my semi-autos are easier, even the 1911's.

What do y'all think about filing the notch so it's closer to 'vertical' to make the slide release depress easier?
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Old March 7, 2013, 05:01 PM   #2
AK103K
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Id leave it alone. Just teach her to do it properly without using the stop.

Just curious, but when did they start making the P250 in .380?
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Old March 7, 2013, 05:39 PM   #3
carguychris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ndsojourn
What do y'all think about filing the notch so it's closer to 'vertical' to make the slide release depress easier?
I think there's a serious risk that the slide won't reliably lock back on an empty mag. Furthermore, you may file off any surface hardening treatment SIG applies to the slide stop notch area, which may cause the notch to become progressively more rounded off, steadily making the problem worse if you and her continue dropping the slide with the stop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK103K
Just teach her to do it properly without using the stop.
+1. An increasing number of experts advise against using the slide stop and favor the overhand method. I won't claim to be an expert, but I do too. This factor- plus the CCW-related desire for more snag-free pistols- probably explains why slide stops are getting progressively smaller on newer pistol designs.
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Old March 7, 2013, 05:42 PM   #4
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Last couple of years all the schooling I've been to the technique now in fashion is the sling shot. Bring the pistol back to you to reload and when you go to chamber a round on slide lock you grab the back serrations and pull as you push with the other hand. Coming over the top to rack the slide can (supposedly) block the ejection port with your hand and cause a empty round to go back into the action during a malfunction drill. Also the sling shot method is easier for weaker people. Guess what I'm suggesting is leave it alone and try this method.
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Old March 7, 2013, 05:42 PM   #5
2ndsojourn
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I'm not sure what you mean by properly. When you shoot 'till the magazine is empty, the slide locks back. Then you switch magazines and depress the slide release, which is hard because the notch is cut at an angle.

I think this modular concept is new. The gun gets easily disassembled, and the entire mechanics slips into a different polymer frame & with a different barrel you can change up to 9x19.
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Old March 7, 2013, 05:45 PM   #6
2ndsojourn
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@carguy & Noreaster, OK. I didn't know that. I always just hit the slide release.
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Old March 7, 2013, 05:57 PM   #7
2ndsojourn
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This is it here

http://www.sigsauer.com/CatalogProdu...itron-380.aspx
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Old March 7, 2013, 06:00 PM   #8
redhologram
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Being female, I would suggest the sling shot method as well. That is what I do with my slides. And if she still has trouble then, get a new gun.
I say that because there was a .380 I had before that even using the sling shot method, it was virtually impossible to rack the slide. I had some pretty colorful language for that particular weapon, especially since I could rack my DB 9mm and Glock 19 with no problems.
Needless to say, that .380 is no longer in my possession.
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Old March 7, 2013, 06:05 PM   #9
Gaerek
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People who shoot a lot of competition will use the slide stop/release because they can save precious fractions of a second.

People who shoot for SD recommend over the top or sling shot for two reasons:

1. Gross motor skill, rather than fine motor skill (hitting smallish button)
2. Any semiauto pistol can be operated by manipulating the slide, whereas every model/brand/etc has a different location for that slide stop

I personally use the slingshot method, but it's because it's easier for my big hands to not block the ejection port, and I have enough hand strength to manage it. Most people who I show the method to though, I teach the over the top method because it requires less strength, and is easier for most people.

Glock calls it a slide stop, and not a slide release for a reason.
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