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Old March 6, 2013, 06:08 PM   #1
Swampman1
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Transfer to son

With all the talk about registering firearms and background checks, and all the bills that are going up around the country, it's all a bit confusing. I hear that with registration, could come confiscation, that I may not be able to hand down my guns to my son if things go the wrong direction here. Now in my state, there is no manditory registration. So am I to assume that if I buy an AR now..while there is no registration necessary in my state, and not register it...that all is good? Or could they tie me in with this purchase from somewhere else? Like a background check at the time of purchase?
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Old March 6, 2013, 06:22 PM   #2
JimDandy
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If you buy an AR15 today, and there is not a registration requirement in your state, there is not one nationally. There will be a paper trail from the manufacturer, to the FFL, to You. If at some point registration does become required, you would most likely then have to register it. An exemption for previously owned firearms is possible, but doesn't seem likely to me. Of course, I'm not a lawyer, but I think it would be a bit of a stretch to apply ex post facto to a registry.
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Old March 6, 2013, 07:50 PM   #3
Spats McGee
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JimDandy may not be a lawyer, but his assessment is spot on. The only point I disagree with is whether an exemption would be made for previously-owned firearms. However, my disagreement is nothing more than hoping that my crystal ball works better than JD's.

Unless and until legislation actually becomes law, we can only speculate as to what "might" happen.
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Old March 6, 2013, 08:18 PM   #4
JimDandy
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I just need to find someone who will let me clerk for them for 7 years or something.
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Old March 6, 2013, 08:26 PM   #5
TDL
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I am not an attorney but if your jurisdiction doesn't require owner to be registrant, one low cost thing you could do is write up a one sentence dated doc with serial number deeding it to your son and have it notarized for a few bucks. On the other cost extreme is making a trust.
who knows what will happen but if the item is forbidden but grandfathered that would be a decent proof. Just keep it in your safe deposit or where ever you keep your will.
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Old March 6, 2013, 11:30 PM   #6
Aguila Blanca
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IMHO, it is unwise to try to predict the future. Your state is not disclosed, and it doesn't need to be. My only point is that none of us can really control what legislatures may do. New York, for example, just made 10-round magazines, which had previously been legal in that state, illegal. Connecticut, which already has an assault weapons ban, is talking about making it even MORE restrictive. CT already has a sort of registration in place, but one of the NINETY new bills being proposed in CT will grandfather currently-owned AR-15s but will require that they be registered -- for a fee, of course -- and that the registration be renewed every two years (for another fee, of course).

Who can predict what your state may enact?
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Old March 7, 2013, 12:29 PM   #7
saltydog452
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My Last Will and such, says that 'all property or equity, real and personal goes to...'. Nothing is up for discussion, snipe hunting, or conjecture. No serial numbers are mentioned. Some items that once burned powder don't have serial numbers.

Neither are there any detailed descriptions of family mementos. Some of those momentos like 'tin type images' and family Bibles that are 'priceless' to me but might be
worthless to a Grand-kids soon to be first ex-spouse.

Maybe, the less said (documented) is better. Dunno.

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Old March 7, 2013, 05:00 PM   #8
Swampman1
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TDL-
Quote:
I am not an attorney but if your jurisdiction doesn't require owner to be registrant, one low cost thing you could do is write up a one sentence dated doc with serial number deeding it to your son and have it notarized for a few bucks. On the other cost extreme is making a trust.
who knows what will happen but if the item is forbidden but grandfathered that would be a decent proof. Just keep it in your safe deposit or where ever you keep your will.
I kinda like that idea TDL. It would be a good idea to run it by your lawyer for sure. Again...do it BEFORE manditory registration.
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