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Old March 6, 2013, 01:04 PM   #1
603Country
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Remington Model 33 - bolt needs a good cleaning

I have a Remington Model 33 single shot 22 bolt action. It has no serial number, so I think that means it was made in the first 2 years of the 3 years of manufacture (1932 and 1933). Every now and then it'll fail to fire. Puts a dent in the primer rim, but apparently not a good enough dent. I can then fire the round in another single shot I have. From what I've read on the internet, the problem could be the firing pin spring or the firing pin itself, but might just be from the accumulated gunk in the bolt from 80 years of shooting. So I'd like to clean the bolt, which means disassembly. The disassembly isn't the part that worries me. I worry about reassembly. Anybody here ever take a Mod 33 bolt apart (and put it back together successfully) and that can give me words of encouragement?

I could take it to a gunsmith, but that'd cost more than I paid for the old rifle. And by the way, that old rifle is quite a shooter. Amazing.
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Old March 6, 2013, 03:20 PM   #2
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Quote:
I have a Remington Model 33 single shot 22 bolt action. It has no serial number, so I think that means it was made in the first 2 years of the 3 years of manufacture (1932 and 1933).
It could have been made any time during the production of the rifle (1932-1935). Serial numbers were not required, and Remington did not number many of their 22s as they were not considered "serious" guns.
Quote:
Anybody here ever take a Mod 33 bolt apart (and put it back together successfully) and that can give me words of encouragement?
I have had Model 33s apart. There is nothing difficult or tricky about them (but I say the same thing about most guns). You most likely need a new firing pin spring, or the base of the bolt handle might be worn, or the firing pin may be peened back a bit. Start with the spring first.
Quote:
I could take it to a gunsmith, but that'd cost more than I paid for the old rifle.
If you take your car to a mechanic and it costs more to repair than the car could be sold for, that says nothing about the value of the car. If you take your rifle apart and cannot put it back together or fix it properly, it is essentially worthless. The value of an item is in its utility. Things that don't work have low/no utility.
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Old March 6, 2013, 04:09 PM   #3
603Country
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The model 33, starting at a time not known to me, had serial numbers, but this one doesn't have a SN. That's why I'm assuming that this one is from the early dates of manufacture. That's not a matter of any importance, since the value of the rifle is probably still only in double figures. The old rifle only has about two things going for it. It's accurate, and I like it.

The old stock appears to be a decent grade of walnut, so I may refinish it. But it I do that, then I'll want it reblued. But on the other hand, I really don't need to do anything other than to make it shoot.

Even if I took the bolt apart, I don't have the firing pin spring or a new firing pin, so I'll probably try to find a gunsmith that's in the area. We had two, but one got too old and one got cancer and passed away.
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Old March 6, 2013, 09:08 PM   #4
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Other than a weak firing pin spring, there are a couple of other things that can cause failures to fire in an old rimfire rifle. In no particular order:

Have you checked the condition of the chamber edge where the fring pin strikes. If the gun was dry fired, there could be a dent in that area and without the rim being supported properly you will get misfires.

Also, there could be a headspace problem resulting from a worn locking surface on the bolt or the receiver.

Another possibility is that the firing pin has struck the barrel often enough that it is flattened on the end, spreading out the force of the blow.

As for dirt in the bolt, I suggest that immersing the bolt in a good solvent and really sloshing it around could be tried before taking the bolt apart.

Jim
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Old March 6, 2013, 10:22 PM   #5
RonR6
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Remington Model 33 - bolt needs a good cleaning

Your bolt might just need a cleaning, my Remington 541-s also started to misfire. The problem was the oil and crud around the firing pin just slowed its impact down a bit, but after a good cleaning it works like new now but I did have do dissemble it to clean it properly. Clean all crevices completely you can use a toothpick to get at tight areas. Make sure as in the posts above the pin, spring or barrel surface where the firing pin would strike is not damaged. Here is a link if you have to take your bolt apart to inspect/clean it.
http://www.msgunowners.com/t34296-di...-model-33-bolt
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Old March 6, 2013, 10:39 PM   #6
603Country
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James K brings up some interesting points. I'll have to check the action for problems, dents, etc. My 9 year old grandson said, when the rifle failed to fire a couple of times, "if I keep this handle down (meaning the bolt knob), it doesn't misfire too much". Maybe it's a headspace problem. The end of the firing pin looked about right in shape and form. The firing pin spring does not feel soft in any way. It takes a good effort to cock the action by pulling back on the 'whatchamacallit'. Yup, I'll bet it is a headspace problem.

I'll try swishing the bolt around in solvent. That's a good easy and cheap way to start. Then I'll see if I can shim the bolt handle to lock the action down tighter. If that works, then I'll need the gunsmith to fix the problem, since I can't figure how I could fix that issue.

Thanks for the ideas, guys.
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Old March 9, 2013, 12:40 PM   #7
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Soak the bolt in some of your mineral spirts
Firing pins and spring can be found online or at the smiths
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Old March 11, 2013, 11:54 AM   #8
Scorch
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603Country-
Examine the base of the bolt handle where it contacts the receiver. The bolt handle is the locking lug, as it wears the headspace increases. Also examine the receiver where the bolt handle contacts it. If this area is worn, you will not be able to correct the problem without replacing or building up the bolt handle.
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Old March 11, 2013, 03:54 PM   #9
603Country
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scorch, your timing is uncanny. I was just looking at the rifle, and at the exact spot you suggested. When the bolt is closed, there is some forward play if I push forward on the bolt handle. There appears to be wear on either the bolt handle or the action bearing surface, or both. Should I be able to move the bolt slightly forward when it's closed? I'm thinking that the answer is no and that I do have a headspace problem. There's room for a feeler gauge at the contact point of bolt 'shoulder' and the action, but the answer, in terms of gap, wouldn't tell me much, other than there's a gap where there shouldn't be.

Can a gunsmith build up the metal at either contact point, or is a new bolt handle the only option? Or how can it be built up successfully? I'm a woodworker and am now out of my field of expertise.

I think I'll go load a round into the action and see if there is still some forward play if I push the bolt handle forward with a round in it. That might tell me something.

I did put a round in the chamber and checked for forward play in the bolt. It will still go forward a bit if I push on the bolt, even when cocked. So...I attempted to fire the rifle with and without the bolt handle being pushed forward. Without it being pushed forward, there were several failures to fire. With me holding the bolt forward, rounds that had not fired were then fired. So...it appears to be a headspace problem caused by wear on bolt and/or the action. Whew. Now to find a gunsmith...

Last edited by 603Country; March 11, 2013 at 05:30 PM.
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Old April 7, 2013, 10:48 PM   #10
weasle94
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remington model33 Winchester model 275

looking for a bolt and some other small parts for the 33 I will buy what I need to to get the bolt (old rusty non working gun)
Need a feedramp and a rxer for the WIN 275
ANYBODY HAS ANY TO SELL ,PLEASE CONTACT ME AT AVCD69@COMCAST.NET thanks
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