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Old March 2, 2013, 09:33 AM   #1
BirchOrr
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Cimarron

I was just on the Cimarron site and saw this claim: "With Cimarron's Original® finish the replica cannot be distinguished from the 150 year old original without close examination."
Does anyone have experience with this?

Birch
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Old March 2, 2013, 10:35 AM   #2
BerdanSS
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I've handled a couple of them....and I don't care for it personally, seemed kinda cheesy. I'd rather give a shiny blued one "original finish" by using it a lot.
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Old March 2, 2013, 11:38 AM   #3
Roshi
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All in your tastes

I like it but frankly you can do it yourself much less expensively.

Many folks think a new looking gun is like it was when it was used in the 1860's to 1900's but from what I've seen of guns in museums is the ones that were used were used well and the shiny new finish (fragile at the time) didn't last long.

Most people didn't have the money for more than a pistol and rifle. They were used regularly, were in the weather a lot, and weren't always cleaned immediately. In addition the oils used back then weren't the "miracle" ones we used today and didn't protect as well.

So when I use my "aged" pistols, I consider them being like the average well used pistol back in the day. Plus I don't have to worry about adding more "character marks" and the occasional rust blemish.
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Old March 2, 2013, 07:21 PM   #4
Willie Sutton
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It's a Uberti finish, Cimmaron is one of three importers of the identical product.

I have three revolvers with that finish, and I prefer it for a number of reasons. It looks great, is low maintenance, and the wear is already there so shooting them a lot does not change them a bit. You can do the same thing yourself (sort of) but they really do a very nice job on them out of the factory.


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Old March 2, 2013, 09:29 PM   #5
Jbar4Ranch
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On close examination, the "original finish" almost looks like some sort of galvanizing job, AND it costs more than the regular blue finish. Buy a blued one, wrap it in vinegar soaked paper towels for an hour or so, then touch it up here and there with Birchwood Casey Plum Brown finish. It will look a hundred years old in no time.
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Old March 2, 2013, 09:37 PM   #6
MJN77
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I don't think the "original" finish is worth the extra $$. The only reason I have one is it was the only choice I had with this type of gun at the time.

As for the finish being " low maintenance", I don't believe I've ever owned a gun with a "high maintenance" finish. To me, scratches, nicks, and dings just add character.
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Old March 3, 2013, 08:18 AM   #7
BirchOrr
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Thanks guys!

Great advice as usual!

I have a 58 Pietta I think I'll attempt this myself. I read through the Birchwood Casey instructions and it seems a bit complicated but I'm gonna go for it.

I'm sure I'll be checking in again with ya as I go along.

Birch
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Old March 3, 2013, 06:18 PM   #8
Willie Sutton
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On close examination, the "original finish" almost looks like some sort of galvanizing job


It's not, it's just a thin finish: It rusts if left with salty fingers. It's really just... "nearly bare metal". I'm not sure how they do the texture, but it looks great, in my humble opinion.

Guns that are done at home from blued ones can also look great.


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Old March 6, 2013, 11:51 AM   #9
BirchOrr
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Well I got started...

Had a used 58 and decided to go for it. Did a search on this forum on how to do it. Used the vinegar/paper towel method. Took longer than I thought! The bluing was tough! Still have some things to do. Going to patina the brass, put some plum brown on it and stain the grips.

I really like the pics you all have posted showing your pistols done this way!

I especially like the blotchy appearance the vinegar gives it.





I want to defarb it as well. Suggestions?

Many thanks gents!

Birch
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Old March 6, 2013, 12:44 PM   #10
bushmaster65
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nice!

I'm looking forward to seeing how this thing turns out. Might just unleash
the vinegar on my "ugly betty" .44 navy brasser.
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Old March 7, 2013, 09:00 AM   #11
ketland
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In the "olden days" the oils used to lubricate guns on the frontier were mostly animal fats, whale oil, tallow, lard, etc. I think today most people since we are so used to mineral oils, would be a bit put off. I have handled old rifles that spent most of their lives in the house rather than the woods, which survived the years in excellent condition, and were likely shot recreationally, and very well cleaned and taken care of. On the other hand I have seen rifles that likely spent a good deal of their lives out on the range, and show all the indications of such a life.
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