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Old February 9, 2013, 10:17 PM   #1
mlk3454
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Brass life for 10mm - any brand

I have decided to add the 10mm to the 9mm and .40 that I reload to bring the per box price down to a more acceptable range. I have saved brass from Underwood and other "store" bought boxes but am curious as to how many loads roughly are people getting out of their brass before discarding it? I dont load max but do get close. I shoot out of both the stock Gen 3 barrel and a Storm Lake 6"
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Old February 10, 2013, 06:41 AM   #2
cryogenic419
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A big part in that is how hot are you loading these. Next would be what brand of brass. Then it would come down to barrels. I know the older Glock barrels did not have the supported chamber, but it seems the newer ones do have it so I am sure that plays a factor in brass life too.

I have some Starlines that have made it through at least 6 moderately hot loadings. Various other ones Remington/UMC, Winchester, Hornady, and Doubletap that some have held up as long, other have had split case mouths.
I cannot remember what brand (I keep leaning toward Winchester) it was that was nickel plated but those seemed to last the least amount of time.

FWIW
The Starline brass seems to be holding up the best as I have yet to trash any of them. The Hornady and Doubletap brass are right behind it.
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Old February 10, 2013, 07:48 AM   #3
mlk3454
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Thanks for the info. Since I have never picked up any 10mm brass at the range that wasn't mine I may have to purchase some. I am just spoiled with a lifetime supply of 9mm and 40 brass that people leave behind.
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Old February 10, 2013, 08:20 AM   #4
cryogenic419
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Its rare to find anybody leaving 10mm behind...that brass is rare. A pretty large LGS I frequent that also has a busy firing range has fired brass for sale. I've talked to them numerous times, they never have 10mm. Sadly the only option most 10mm owners have is to buy new brass instead of once fired.
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Old February 10, 2013, 04:03 PM   #5
m&p45acp10+1
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The nickled cases will tend to split way before the brass ones do. They sould give you quite a few reloads. Cause of splitting tends to be from flaring them, then ironing that back out. AKA work hardening. As all metals brass will fatigue, and crack at a point. Like bending a coat hanger back and forth repeatedly.
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Old February 10, 2013, 04:51 PM   #6
mlk3454
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Thanks for the good info guys.

On a side note does anyone do any special case prep before reloading? I don't clean/tumble or clean the inside of the case or primer pockets for the 9 or 40. I am guessing the 10mm would be as simple to deal with.
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Old February 10, 2013, 04:55 PM   #7
BigJimP
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lean 10mm the same way you do any handgun cases..../ I tumble mine in crushed walnut shell media in a vibrating tumbler....( I don't resize and deprime before I tumble them - but some guys do )...but I don't think its necessary.

But with a high pressure case like a 10mm ( and even a .40 S&W ) its pretty important to clean them - then inspect them - prior to reloading.
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Old February 10, 2013, 05:33 PM   #8
Mike / Tx
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I load a pretty stout load of AA-9 under the 180gr Gold Dot. To be honest I loose more cases than I have split or become useless in some other way.

Mine don't throw them into a nice neat pile like my ACP does, it chunks them out there in a pattern like a shotgun would.

That said I use Stareline brass almost exclusively in all of my handguns, and have found it is about as good as it gets for durability.
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Old February 10, 2013, 06:58 PM   #9
Brian Pfleuger
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You'll be hard pressed to keep finding 10mm (or any other semiauto) brass until it fails. You might get some split necks, especially in nickel plated for some reason, but most of it will be lost before it fails.
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Old February 10, 2013, 07:48 PM   #10
cryogenic419
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I think the nickel plated ones split earlier because you have a softer pliable metal with layer on top which is a harder metal. The brass expands quite easy but the nickel wants to stay the same size.
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