The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 7, 2013, 07:28 PM   #1
h_townner
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 6, 2013
Location: Space city, USA
Posts: 10
Newbie here with some questions

First of all, thanks for allowing me to be part of this group. Im new to the forum and new to reloading. For at least 6 months I've been patiently saving and buying reloading equipment a little at a time and trying to learn as much as possible. I currently own a Redding T-7 and a couple set of dies for my 357 handgun and my newest aquisition an AR in 223/5.56. Also own a few other caliber guns but for now I'm going to settle for this 2 calibers. Also I own the lyman and lee manuals and a few other things like a powder scale and a few basic case prep tools.

I was lucky enough to have been saving my 357 brass and currently have about 500 to reload. In this uncertain times, it took several trips to sporting good stores to finally be able to score some gun powder, primers and bullets. And being that straight walled cases are easier to learn on, I ventured and pressed a few rounds (that I have yet to go shoot). I carefully followed the lyman manual and did the suggested starting load to kind of get a feeling of the process and to get acquainted with the equipment. I don't have a doubt that the loaded rounds are going to be ok, except I need to experiment with the load to find the sweet spot for my handgun.

During those trips to the stores, I was able to also put my hands on 200 new 223 cases (winchester) and the only gun powder available was CFE223, however I haven't find any small rifle primers nor any bullets. Also, I was extremely lucky to find some 5.56 ammo, Independence made in Israel. I have a few questions, if I may:

1.- All reloading data for 223 also applies to 5.56? In other words, after I shoot my factory ammo and save my cases, I can reload them with the 223 load data?

2.- When following the suggested loads on any manual, the specs listed are for the tested guns (clearly specified on the load data)....what can I safely expect, as far as the results IF my gun is totally different than that specified on the load data? Particularly, in the Hodgdon data for CFE223 the test gun had barrel lenght of 24 in with a 1 in 12 rate of twist...my gun has a 16in barrel and 1 in 9 rate of twist....can I safely follow the suggested load data?

Sorry for the long post, I'm sure I'm going to have a lot more questions in the future.
h_townner is offline  
Old February 7, 2013, 10:10 PM   #2
oldpapps
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 22, 2011
Location: Middle America
Posts: 428
h,

Welcome to the gab fest.

Your first question:
Functionally the brass and chambering for both the .223 Rem and the 5.56 NATO can be considered to be the same. If you look at the actual drawings, they are different, but not much. There is a difference in the throating between the two at the chamber barrel point. Much has been said about this, both good and bad, true and false. What counts is that the loader should start at a beginning load that is known to be safe and slowly increase the powder charge until the loader reaches the desired loading. Loading books/manuals/data will have a listed max load. This must be considered the hottest loading, but only after the loader slowly works up to it, if needed. That max is for your safety.
So, yes, start with the listed 'starting' load, for either the .223 or the 5.56.

Your next question:
I have found with testing that two or more weapons that are the same model, chambering and barrel length will all perform at different levels with the same ammunition loading. The 'book' loadings are to give a general reference point with changing components. Your/other weapons will have similar results but not the same.

And to your apology for a long post..... Are you trying to tell me something


Load with care and enjoy.

OSOK
oldpapps is offline  
Old February 7, 2013, 11:10 PM   #3
h_townner
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 6, 2013
Location: Space city, USA
Posts: 10
Thanks for clarifing that for me, I can then use whatever is published for 223 to load5.56. .....so based on your answer to the second question, I can pretty much disregard their recommendation as their BEST results....unless of course my gun matches the description of their test gun and ALL components are the same, correct? And if that's the case....then I need to find whatever combination works best for my gun. Hmmmmmmm. I can see a lot of trial and error on the horizon...

Not that I mind, but I just wish components were more readily accesable.

I just about gave up on loaded "cheap" ammo and so far my only luck has been some components. BTW, for now, I only intend to target shoot with my reloaded ammo as I still have a good stack of hunting ammo.

Thanks for your reply.
h_townner is offline  
Old February 8, 2013, 12:03 AM   #4
oldpapps
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 22, 2011
Location: Middle America
Posts: 428
Reloading doesn't save any money.... it only makes it cheaper to shoot a lot more.

After a while you will shoot up your factory stuff just so you can load your own 'good' stuff.

I haven't bought 'store bought' in years and years. After the current stupidity has settled down and prices go back to normal (what ever that is), stock up and load away. The search for 'that' load that wrings everything out of a weapon is the quest and is enjoyment.

I buy or trade for a weapon, build a load or loads to extract it's greatest strengths. Then sell/trade for the next. I find it both enjoyable and fulfilling. I'm broken and don't get to hunt more than small holes in paper much anymore.
Every weapon has a nitch that can be found and exploited. You are working with a .357 and soon will be with a .223/5.56. Different end of the weapons spectrum. Both are very functional with rapid follow up shots. Double and triple taps. Neither are ideal for deer hunting (assuming the local laws permit them at all). Yet both are a lot of fun and can be excellent target toys.

Enjoy your weapons to the fullest,

OSOK
oldpapps is offline  
Old February 8, 2013, 01:30 PM   #5
maillemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 30, 2010
Posts: 995
Quote:
Reloading doesn't save any money.... it only makes it cheaper to shoot a lot more.
But if you don't shoot more, then you do save money!

I shoot about the same amount as I used to. When I take my cartridge gun to the range, I put about 200 rounds through it. A box of 50 right now is about $22 from MidwayUSA for Winchester White Box. That's $88 for 4 boxes.

I can make a box of 50 for about $4. So I can shoot the same 4 boxes for $16. That's a savings of $72.

That's a big deal to me. That's the difference between getting to go shooting or not getting to go shooting. $88 is nearly my spending money for the month.

Steve
maillemaker is offline  
Old February 8, 2013, 01:50 PM   #6
gundog5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2013
Posts: 116
yes, you will save money with reloads over store bought rounds if you shoot the same amount. Oh, and don't forget to dumpster-dive while at the range. I have saved a ton on brass but only take the once fired cases that I can use and leave the rest.
gundog5 is offline  
Old February 8, 2013, 06:53 PM   #7
oldpapps
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 22, 2011
Location: Middle America
Posts: 428
"But if you don't shoot more, then you do save money!"

Well, that's no fun.
.

Got to enjoy.

OSOK
oldpapps is offline  
Old February 8, 2013, 07:42 PM   #8
h_townner
Junior Member
 
Join Date: February 6, 2013
Location: Space city, USA
Posts: 10
My whole idea to reload is to be able to shoot more......so, I know I wont be saving money but I will enjoy shooting a lot more, specially now that I introduced my daughters to the shooting sports. And boy, oh boy......sometimes I have to hide my ammo they got hooked like on the first outing.....
Even during this scarse times all I hear is when do we get to shoot the AR?
h_townner is offline  
Old February 8, 2013, 09:26 PM   #9
oldpapps
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 22, 2011
Location: Middle America
Posts: 428
h,

It only gets worse. Started my son when he was 3, Browning HiPower. And my daughter at 2, 1911. Figured she would be scared and quit bugging me. Nope, bang, "Do again daddy, do again." And she still hasn't stopped after 30 years. At least my son no longer wants to shoot my stuff, all of the time

Enjoy,

OSOK
oldpapps is offline  
Old February 11, 2013, 12:05 AM   #10
Mike1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 9, 2008
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 118
I haven't used the CFE powder yet, but as my rule of thumb, there will probably be a 30-50fps less difference for every inch in your shorter bbl. Only a chrono will tell what you get.

I would work on perfect functioning and accuracy over higher velocity.
Mike1 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08627 seconds with 7 queries