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Old February 6, 2013, 10:51 AM   #1
jedi391
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How much would it cost if someone started building all new M1 Garands?

If some company were to start building M1 Garands to the same exact specs as the original, with forged receivers, no MIM, etc. and parts made and sourced in the US, what would it likely cost?
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Old February 6, 2013, 11:17 AM   #2
DMK
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Wasn't Springfield Armory making repro M1 Garands a while back for about the same price as their M1As?
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Old February 6, 2013, 11:41 AM   #3
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They would have to compete with thousands upon thousands of existing USGI rifles, and they'd cost somewhere around the $1500 of the base Springfield Armory, Inc., M1A rifles. In other words, they'd lose money hand over fist. That's my reasoning.
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Old February 6, 2013, 11:49 AM   #4
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IIRC, the Springfield Armory ones were going for a bit over $1000 a few years ago.

That's priced right in line with the CMP Special Grade rifles (which have new barrels and stocks, but other parts may be reconditioned)- they are basically new condition rifles, but without any expressed warranty.

So you'd probably be talking $1200-1500ish. Mind you, SA apparently didn't make enough on theirs to keep them in production, likely thanks to the large supply of existing USGI and reconditioned USGI rifles. But when that stock of rifles sells out (and the CMP seems to think they have another few years of supply of them) it will be a whole new ball game.

I would have thought that maybe, just maybe, fixed magazine rifles like the Garand and SKS might have a comeback if magazine bans were passed into law and approved by the courts. However, the anti gun folks seem to have decided 10 rounds is too many and seven is about right (for now), so those models by themselves aren't workable for those in states like NY if those bans stand.
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Old February 6, 2013, 12:01 PM   #5
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I believe Fulton Armory produces new M1's in addition to their M14's and last I heard they were going for around $1700.
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Old February 6, 2013, 12:47 PM   #6
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Yep, Fulton Armory makes M1s, M1 carbines, M1As, AR-10s, AR-15s and another model. Maybe 1903?

But they are ALL pretty pricey.
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Old February 6, 2013, 05:47 PM   #7
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I wouldn't be opposed to spending ~$1500 on a brand new QUALITY M1 Garand that I can shoot and modify without worrying about it's historic or collectible value, maybe even a bit more. The problem is, I don't have that kind of money and even if I did scrape it together I probably wouldn't spend it on one gun.
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Old February 6, 2013, 07:06 PM   #8
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I saw the Springfield Armory M1 Garands. My recollection was that the cast receivers were made in Austrailia. The wood was new Boyd's, all other metal parts were GI. Garand parts were cheap then, compared to now. You could get a like new bolt for $35.00.

Garands/M14's were very expensive firearms to make. They were on a par with FAL's. Adjusted for inflation, the prices for new FAL's , as found in Gun Digest of the 70's, would be about $3,000. I believe Garands/M14's would cost about the same if made of all forged parts.


I was talking with Garand availability with an active Highpower Competitor since the early 60’s. It was very hard to get a Garand. The only way to get a NM Garand was to go to Camp Perry and buy one for $160.00. That was $1,160 in 2011 money. You could buy a used one, from ads in the American Rifleman, but they were going for $86.00. Most civilian competitors shot with M1903A3’s. This gentleman was able to get “his” Garand after he bought a Devine M1a in the 70’s.
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Old February 6, 2013, 08:25 PM   #9
James K
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AFAIK, Springfield Armory Inc.'s receivers are cast so they don't fit jedi391's criteria.

Now here is the problem. Forging is fairly cheap once set up and in production. BUT, the forging equipment costs like heck and requires really heavy duty support. It also shakes the bejesus out of the building and the surrounding area. (When S&W cranked up production at the old Roosevelt Avenue plant before WWII, the forging hammers literally shook the Civil War era building to pieces.) Those are the reasons most makers choose not to use forgings.

Casting receivers can be done in a strip mall.

Then forgings require more machine work to clean up than castings. (MIM parts require the least work of all, being ready to go as they come from the mold.)

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Old February 6, 2013, 08:37 PM   #10
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I understand you want all USA parts however, if you sourced the forging work out of US and then did all machining in the US you would still qualify as a made in USA rifle.
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Old February 6, 2013, 08:46 PM   #11
James K
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You could probably have them made in Pakistan out of railroad rail, but that wasn't in the original post. Might have a problem with quantity production, though.

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Old February 6, 2013, 08:48 PM   #12
Art Eatman
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I rather doubt that the market is there for a repro Garand. Most of the sales, from what I read on firearms websites, are due to nostalgia. Nice to have a collectible which can be shot.

The M1A is popular because of the box magazine and the availability of .308 ammo, as much as anything else, seems like.
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Old February 6, 2013, 11:58 PM   #13
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+1
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Old February 7, 2013, 10:56 AM   #14
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Quote:
I wouldn't be opposed to spending ~$1500 on a brand new QUALITY M1 Garand that I can shoot and modify without worrying about it's historic or collectible value, maybe even a bit more. The problem is, I don't have that kind of money and even if I did scrape it together I probably wouldn't spend it on one gun.
Then get a CMP Garand. Maybe a Special Grade. They are, for all practical purposes, a new rifle built on a refurbished receiver. $995. The CMP doesn't have an "official" warranty, but if you have any problems, they WILL take care of you. Their CS is the best around.

Or do what I did and get a Service Grade for $625. Mine can with a 1954 rebarrel that looks like it has never been shot.

http://www.thecmp.org/Sales/m1garand.htm
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Old February 7, 2013, 12:22 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishbed77
Then get a CMP Garand. Maybe a Special Grade. They are, for all practical purposes, a new rifle built on a refurbished receiver. $995.
Fishbed speaks truth.

My Special Grade looked brand new. WWII serialed receiver with some WWII hardware, new barrel and wood, it looks GREAT. At least, it did until I dropped it and dinged the stock right as I was getting ready to oil it.

Can't give me anything nice.

25 coats of BLO and 3 light coats of wax later, it looks great. Except for the nick. Unfortunately, I've not yet had time to shoot it, but if somebody wants a good M1 Garand, the CMP Special will be a basically new rifle- maybe not the most collectible, but definitely in fantastic shape and ready for a good long lifetime of shooting.
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Old February 7, 2013, 03:03 PM   #16
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At 995 and $1150 respectively, the Special and Correct grade CMP rifles are a good deal.

I bought a Service grade and had it rebuild. It's a "like new" Garand today, but I had around $1500 into it by the time it was done.



Last edited by DMK; February 7, 2013 at 03:10 PM.
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