The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: General

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 11, 2013, 10:46 PM   #1
Pops1085
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 25, 2012
Posts: 217
Trigger finger placement?

Hey just got back from the range and I had a buddy telling me that I was pulling the trigger with the wrong part of my finger? I generally have a pretty choked up grip on the pistol grip and can pull it with my second pad (middle). He however, told me that you should only use the tip of your finger so that you don't pull the barrel when you shoot. Is there a proper way to do this? I guess I've never really put much thought into it.
Pops1085 is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 10:54 PM   #2
globemaster3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 28, 2006
Posts: 1,218
All of the training the USAF has given me in both M-9, M-16, and M-4, have all emphasized using the first pad on your finger for trigger pull. Going to the second pad, past the distant joint, I hear the CATM folks refer to as "booger hooking".

If you think about it, you will be the most accurate with the least amount of energy you impart to the rifle. That first pad allows a light touch. Getting into that second pad now requires more squeeze to trip the sear using more of your finger, imparting some side-side motion if you are not careful.

There are some great shooters on here, with many NRA-certified instructors floating around. I am sure you will get some more valuable information shortly.
globemaster3 is offline  
Old January 11, 2013, 11:56 PM   #3
TheDoubleDeuce
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 8, 2013
Posts: 108
Globemaster, do you mind me asking what your AFSC is?
TheDoubleDeuce is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 02:25 AM   #4
Metal god
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 10, 2012
Location: San Diego CA
Posts: 2,056
I not only use the first pad on my finger . I've been trying to find the best spot of the pad to use . I have found that the very tip does not work for me cus I will push the rifle to the left . Just left of center or just past the tip not quite to center works best . When placed there I do not push or pull the rifle to either side .
__________________
As of this date 8-18-14 at 6:42am I became a proud grandfather I guess I'm officially old

Last edited by Metal god; January 12, 2013 at 04:43 AM.
Metal god is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 02:42 AM   #5
chris in va
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2004
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 12,596
Speaking of USAF, we weren't allowed to put our M16's on full auto the one time we shot them in Basic.

One guy did and got 'washed back'.

But anyway I find using the second pad to be more natural when firing my AR. I have to consciously move my finger to the first pad.
chris in va is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 06:09 AM   #6
AndyWest
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 14, 2011
Posts: 621
I use the first pad, centered as if you were trying to leave the perfect fingerprint on the trigger. Just seems easier for me to "squeeze" smoothly.
__________________
Shoot smart. Shoot S-Mart.
AndyWest is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 06:09 AM   #7
Bart B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 15, 2009
Posts: 5,229
TRIGGER CONTROL
Chapter 3: Army Marksmanship Training Guide

Encyclopedia of Bullseye Pistol

A. GENERAL.

Correct trigger control must be employed in conjunction with all other fundamentals of shooting. The physical act of applying pressure on the trigger to deliver an accurate shot may vary from individual to individual. Proper trigger control for each individual gradually assumes uniformity when the techniques of proper application are mastered. Many shooters, for example, maintain a degree of trigger control with a relatively light grip, while another shooter may use a very tight grip. Some shooters prefer to apply consistent trigger pressure at a rapid rate, while maintaining correct sight alignment. For another shooter, a slower, deliberate application may achieve the same results. An ever increasing number of shooters use the positive approach to trigger control, that is, once it is initiated, it becomes an uninterrupted, constantly increasing pressure until the weapon fires.

Trigger control is of very great importance in producing an accurate shot. When the shooter exerts pressure on the trigger, he must do so in a manner that does not alter the sight alignment, or position of the pistol. In Figure 3-1 below, either finger position on the trigger will pull the trigger straight back and not alter sight alignment when the pistol fires. Consequently, the shooter must be able to exert smooth, even pressure to the trigger. Furthermore, the trigger must be pressed in conjunction with maximum concentration, peak visual perception of sight alignment and minimum arc of movement.

In order to produce an accurate shot, the shooter must carry out many diverse, but related, actions. Fulfilling this action is compounded by the fact that the pistol is in some degree of motion throughout the period of sighting and aiming. The movement varies according to the stability of the shooter's stance. Consequently, the sight alignment deviates from the aiming area. Often it will move through the aiming area, pausing only for a short period of time in perfect alignment with the target. It is impossible to determine when, and for how long the properly aligned sights will stay in the center of the aiming area. This difficulty is aggravated further by the fact that the shooter is trying to execute coordinated actions when reflex action seeks to contradict them. Such a situation requires the development of conditioned reflexes, and improvement of coordination.



Figure 3-1. Correct Placement of the Index Finger on the Trigger. (a) With Joint of Index Finger. (b) With First Bone Section of Index Finger.

================

From the "Four Fundamentals of Marksmanship" for the M16A2

Trigger Finger. The trigger finger (index finger on the firing hand) is placed on the trigger between the first joint and the tip of the finger (not the extreme end) and adjusted depending on hand size, grip, and so on. The trigger finger must squeeze the trigger straight to the rear so the hammer falls without disturbing the lay of the rifle. When a live round is fired, it is difficult to see what effect trigger pull had on the lay of the rifle. It is important to experiment with many finger positions during dry-fire training to ensure the hammer is falling with little disturbance to the aiming process.
__________________
US Navy Distinguished Marksman Badge 153
Former US Navy & Palma Rifle Team Member
NRA High Power Master & Long Range High Master
NRA Smallbore Prone Master

Last edited by Bart B.; January 12, 2013 at 06:32 AM.
Bart B. is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 07:10 AM   #8
giaquir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2006
Location: Deerfield,New Hampshire
Posts: 450
There prolly is an optimum finger placement
on a trigger.
But the most important act is to practice,practice
pulling the trigger straight back no matter where your finger
is on the trigger. Once you got this instilled in muscle memory.
It don't matter where your finger is placed.
giaquir is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 07:35 AM   #9
Kreyzhorse
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 12, 2006
Location: NKY
Posts: 11,502
Using the second pad, at least when shooting a handgun, causes your wrist to turn inward. Try it using the index finger on your opposite hand as your "trigger" and you will notice how it your wrist wants to "break" inward.

Using just the tip of your finger helps to keep your wrist straighter in my experience. As a result, not matter what I'm shooting, I use the tip.
__________________
"He who laughs last, laughs dead." Homer Simpson
Kreyzhorse is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 09:41 AM   #10
globemaster3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 28, 2006
Posts: 1,218
PM sent with AFSC info.

Figure b in what Bart provided was what my meager words were trying to describe.
globemaster3 is offline  
Old January 12, 2013, 09:59 AM   #11
jmr40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 6,090
If using a target gun with a very light pull I usually use the 1st pad. On most hunting rifles and shotguns I use the joint between the 1st and 2nd pad. When using the joint you have bone against the trigger instead of padded flesh. This really helps with consistent pull, especially on 3+ lb triggers.
jmr40 is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 12:57 AM   #12
Pops1085
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 25, 2012
Posts: 217
So from the discriptions above it is okay for me to go back to shooting with the joint... I can hear the argument for increased trigger sensitivity with the pad but I have to pull so much less with the joint. As long as I'm not jerking hard I don't see a problem
Pops1085 is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 01:05 AM   #13
big al hunter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 12, 2011
Location: Washington state
Posts: 952
Try both ways and use which one gives the best groups on target.
__________________
You can't fix stupid....however ignorance can be cured through education!
big al hunter is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 04:39 AM   #14
giaquir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2006
Location: Deerfield,New Hampshire
Posts: 450
So from the discriptions above it is okay for me to go back to shooting with the joint... I can hear the argument for increased trigger sensitivity with the pad but I have to pull so much less with the joint. As long as I'm not jerking hard I don't see a problem

Exactly, as long as you've "trained" your finger and mind to pull
straight back each and every time (muscle memory) ,place your
finger wherever it's most comfortable on the trigger. It's just more
difficult mechanically the further you move towards the knuckle.
giaquir is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 11:06 AM   #15
spacecoast
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 14, 2009
Location: Sunshine and Keystone States
Posts: 4,152
I shoot a lot of double action revolvers... definitely the first joint for me.
spacecoast is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 11:22 AM   #16
TXAZ
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 5, 2010
Location: TEXAS!
Posts: 1,478
2 on the trigger

Maybe I'm a little different with my 2 hand grip, but it works for me. Seems most comfortable, and the groups are smaller when I have my left trigger finger on the trigger in position A (above) and my right trigger finger is on top of my left finger using position B, literally 2 fingers on the trigger. I squeeze with both. It works for me.

As giaquir said, practice, practice, practice, and I'd add use whatever works best for you.
__________________
!أنا لست إرهابي

Last edited by TXAZ; February 2, 2013 at 09:13 AM.
TXAZ is offline  
Old February 2, 2013, 08:57 AM   #17
oryx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2008
Posts: 140
Experiment and use what works best for you. The main objective is to pull the trigger rearward without moving the rifle. If you can do it by sticking your finger further past the first pad it is fine.

Shooting techniques are generally very traditional, but don't bew afraid to adapt to what works for you. I personally don't use perfect pad placement and tend to favor more toward the joint. It allows me a more natural position using the standard AR grip (which is neccessary for HP Service rifle) and gives me better leverage on the trigger. Again, the objective is to be able torelease the hammer without moving the gun.
oryx is offline  
Reply

Tags
ar-15 , shooting , tactics

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10702 seconds with 9 queries