The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 29, 2013, 11:38 AM   #1
kilroy77
Junior Member
 
Join Date: January 29, 2013
Posts: 2
5.56 brass

Not to start a 223 vs 5.56 discussion but I just bought a 223 bolt rifle
And wanted to reload some rounds using 5.56 brass I know the lake city brass is thicker wall. Is it advisble to do this ? What other problem would I run in to using surpluses brass
kilroy77 is offline  
Old January 29, 2013, 11:55 AM   #2
mikikanazawa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2004
Posts: 449
Lake City brass is NOT nominally thicker than .223 brass. This is a common misconception.

However, on military ammo the primers are swaged into the pockets so you'll have to be more cautious when decapping. And the pockets will need to be reamed or re-swaged before priming again.
mikikanazawa is offline  
Old January 29, 2013, 09:16 PM   #3
kilroy77
Junior Member
 
Join Date: January 29, 2013
Posts: 2
i have swag the primer pockets out for when i reload for my ar15
but didnt know if there was any thing else that i should be aware of

thanks
kilroy77 is offline  
Old January 29, 2013, 10:16 PM   #4
Gary L. Griffiths
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 7, 2000
Location: On The Road, somewhere in the good ol' US of A.
Posts: 1,213
Other than watching the case length, you should be good to go with your 5.56mm brass. IIWY, I'd trim to minimum .223 spec.
__________________
Violence is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and valorous feeling which believes that nothing is worth violence is much worse. Those who have nothing for which they are willing to fight; nothing they care about more than their own personal safety; are miserable creatures who have no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of those better than themselves. Gary L. Griffiths, Chief Instructor, Advanced Force Tactics, Inc. (Paraphrasing John Stuart Mill)
Gary L. Griffiths is offline  
Old January 29, 2013, 10:36 PM   #5
Shane Tuttle
Staff
 
Join Date: November 28, 2005
Location: Blue Grass, IA
Posts: 8,545
Moving over to the Handloading forum...
__________________
If it were up to me, the word "got" would be deleted from the English language.

Posting and YOU: http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/posting
Shane Tuttle is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 01:47 AM   #6
medalguy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 31, 2009
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 1,017
Load data is always listed for .223. No one makes 5.56mm dies that I have ever seen. The primary differences, as you may know, are in the chamber dimensions of the different rounds, and there MAY be differing chamber pressures in some rifles due to these dimension differences.

I think you'll find, as long as you keep the loads midrange and not maximum, that you will get more reloads out of GI brass than commercial.
medalguy is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 10:30 AM   #7
Wyoredman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 1,249
To slightly hi-jack this thread, can you decap a crimped primer with a standard .223 decaping die/pin?
__________________
Go Pokes!
Go Rams!
Wyoredman is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 11:12 AM   #8
bull bob
Member
 
Join Date: October 29, 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 76
Normally, yes. I have de-capped lots of crimped primers. Getting a new one back in without reaming or swaging the primer pocket is the real pain.
bull bob is offline  
Old January 30, 2013, 12:36 PM   #9
mikikanazawa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2004
Posts: 449
Quote:
Load data is always listed for .223. No one makes 5.56mm dies that I have ever seen. The primary differences, as you may know, are in the chamber dimensions of the different rounds, and there MAY be differing chamber pressures in some rifles due to these dimension differences.
.223 Rem and 5.56x45 NATO are dimensionally identical, so common .223 loading dies can be used for either round. The difference is that the 5.56x45 NATO chamber has a longer leade.

Since the bullet has more free-travel through the leade in a 5.56x45 NATO chamber, the peak pressure is lower: the bullet already has a running start by the time it engages rifling.

In a typical .223 Rem chamber, the leade may be short enough to require excess pressure to get the bullet moving down the bore. This is a side effect of the common "match" chamber where the bullet is seated as close to the rifling as possible.

There are a few loading manuals that list both a "service rifle" .223 and 5.56x45 NATO. In these manuals the load data is identical except the powder charges are slightly higher in 5.56x45 NATO.

That's why it's safe to shoot .223 Rem in a gun chambered for 5.56x45 NATO but not vice-versa.
mikikanazawa is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.07234 seconds with 7 queries