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Old January 25, 2013, 09:34 PM   #1
BigTex308
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Which Progressive Press?

Which one do you like best and why? Also which would you recommend based on what I plan to do?


A little back story.............


I reload 9 different calibers (on progressive, I load more but prefer single stage for those.) and have at least 3-4 different powder charges/types that I use for each. So around 30 different powder charges in all.

I have a Lee Loadmaster and I just bought a Dillion 550.


I'm looking for a press that I can easily adjust the powder charge and that has a decent priming system. (The priming system on the Lee sucks so I've been priming by hand which is a pain in my @$$. Can't speak for the Dillion yet because I haven't set it up yet.)

I like the Lee due to the fact that I can easily change powder charges. Just wish the quality was better and had a better priming system.


The Dillion seems like it will be a pain to adjust the powder charge easily. I could always buy different hoppers and tool heads for different calibers but then that'd be 30 and I'm not that rich. And also it's not auto indexing.


I've been looking at the Hornady Lock N Load. (Not the $1,000 one but the base model without the case and bullet feed systems.) It seems to be easy to adjust powder throw and seems like a decent press. Plus I can add on the case and bullet feed systems later.



Any advice is appreciated but please keep in mind about the powder issue. Also please let me know how the priming system holds up.



Thanks in advance.




Ike
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Old January 25, 2013, 10:50 PM   #2
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The more calibers you reload the more you will appreciate a simple press. There is no press simpler, with fewer moving parts than my RCBS Pro 2000. I load 4 pistol calibers, and 4 rifle calibers....and counting. No factory case feeder. Bullet feeders work great if you want that.

Here's the thing: Dillons are super duper for what they are made for....to make IPSC and IDPA shooters very happy.....set up the competition caliber and load like hell. But you can change calibers on a Pro 2000, including primer size, in the time it takes a Dillon 650 owner to change primer size. Changing primer size on my press takes 8 seconds without practice. I often load two calibers in one evening session, and sometimes three.

Hornady uses the same powder measure as RCBS....it does have a larger hopper...you have to pay extra for that on RCBS. Hornady licenses the Uniflow design, and they came up with a killer case-activated linkage for it, so that it could be used with the AP. RCBS licenses Hornady's linkage (since their own first one stunk) for the Uniflow used in the Pro 2000. Both have powder dies and powder through expanders available to make changing powder extremely fast. IOW's you buy extra powder dies for each caliber....instead of extra powder measures for each caliber, Dillon style.

The tool (die) heads for the pistol calibers I have set up are populated with dies, in ready-adjustment for that caliber....which includes powder dies, and bullet feeder dies. Slide on, drop in two pins, drop the powder measure on...all set to load.

If you like CCI primers, then buying preloaded APS strips of them is the fastest and safest way to prime period. Changing primers is simply grabbing a different box. (and maybe an 8 second primer rod change if needed) No tubes to load...ready to go already. No tubes to explode either. If you prefer other brands of primers, the loading primers into strips is about the same as pecking primers into tubes. This is RCBS's APS system.

Hornady's primer system is less touble free. There are plenty of threads on the three forums I see, on tuning their primer system.

Dillon's primer systems work smoother than Hornady's but all systems are capable of loading a primer in sideways and possibly kabooming up to 100 primers at once. That's why they have protective sleeves....so that you only have hearing loss and a hole in the ceiling. (and of course free parts to order from Dillon to replace the mangled ones) APS kabooms are rarer than hen's teeth, and even then, can only light ONE....primer.

If you have to have the speed of case feeders, bullet feeders, and even possibly a motorized crank, then Dillon is your machine. But don't expect to change calibers daily....that's going to get old.

If you want 3-5 separate twist-lock dies to handle every time you change calibers, rather than instant inserting of pre-populated tool heads, then maybe Hornady makes the press you want. Just be careful you don't grab a wrong die.....there's going to be a lot to choose from with all the calibers you are talking about.

For me, I like the simplicity of a press that is set up once, and never gets out of sync.....and no rods and things to distract the watching of what's important.....powder charge. Keep in mind that case feeders slow down caliber changes. Interesting...Hornady's bullet feeder does not. That's why I bought and use one on my RCBS Pro 2000.

One more thing....there is NO such thing as a perfect press. Just a perfect fitting press, tweaked for you.
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Old January 25, 2013, 10:56 PM   #3
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Priming

The Lee Safety Prime as used on the Lee Classic Turret and the Lee Classic Cast Single Stage and Challenger Single Stage presses is a HUGE advance over the priming system on the Pro-1000 (which I have used) and the Loadmaster (which I have not used).

The Safety prime is manually operated, but keeps the primers up and above the debris from spent primers and allows you to easily see the primer when it is dropped into the primer cup.

Sadly, this does not help you much unless you might consider the Lee Classic Turret (which is what I switched to when I decided I did not like fussing with my Pro-1000 presses). I am much happier now. But that is my loading style and quantity needs, not yours.

Good luck.

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Old January 26, 2013, 04:24 AM   #4
bubbacrabb
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So you have a 550 and you assume it could be difficult to adjust? I dont really understand. If you have one you should be able to tell. They make an easy adjust knob for the powder measure thats made by an aftermarket company. My 550 does just fine on adjustments. I have 2 powder measures. one I use exclusively for all my pistol calibers, and one that I dedicated to rifle. It makes it a lot easier having a different tool head for each caliber for sure. The priming system can be a little pain, but usually with just some small adjustments and cleaning it works flawlessly for a long while til it needs it again.
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Old January 26, 2013, 08:00 AM   #5
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I have the Hornady LNL AP and am quite happy with it.

The powder measure that comes with it is pretty easy to make adjustments to. There are 2 rotors to choose from, pistol and rifle. I am not sure what the max limit of powder the pistol rotor is capable of but I am loading 9mm, 10mm, .40, and .45 with it. The only handgun I am not able to use that rotor for is 500 Mag as I am dropping 38 grains of powder for that one. As far as adjustments go, its just loosen up the lock ring, turning the knob and dialing in your desired weight. Its been consistant and trouble free for me for me.

Some people have had trouble with the priming system, I am lucky in that respect as its been trouble free for me. I just use a flux brush with a touch of powered graphite to dust the primer shuttle and pathway that it is in, as well as the primer seater plugs. Provides them with some sort of lubrication that won't contaminate primer or powders. Changing the primer seating plugs is kind of a pain st first, once you get the hang of it it gets alot simpler. I put a very light layer of anti seize compoud on the threads on the seater plugs every now and again as it seemed to help installation and removal. One thing you will want to do is put something like a round cutout from an electrical conduit box or a dime beneath the primer seater plug. The press is aluminum, the seater plug is steel (at least the part that makes contact with the press is), you will get a divit in the press that will eventually make it impossible to seat primers correctly. The piece underneath the seating plug fixes this and should ever need to be...easily replaced. Use a small touch of plumbers putty, caulk or even toothpaste to hold this piece in place.

One thing that most likely WILL happen with the priming system is if you have a powder spill, even a few specks of powder...if it gets in the pathway will give you problems. I have seen where some people will use cans of compressed air to blow out the path. I prefer to not send powder particles everywhere...I use a little egg of silly putty to collect whatever is iin there. Its grabs loose items and doesn't leave anything behind. After that I give it a quick brushing with the graphite again.

I will tell you upfront that this machine does need some tweaking when you first get it. I would say if something on the machine isn't working right, it is probably in need of adjustment on the pawls. Once you get them adjusted you should be golden. The link I am posting is a wonderful explanation of which pawl is responsible for what.

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=368171
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Old January 26, 2013, 09:57 AM   #6
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on the LnL if you keep the priming system clean it is fantastic, but a few grains of powder in the wrong place it is a nightmare. This whole thing has been beat to death on a half a dozen threads recently, I suggest doing a search and reading a few of them

as far as a progressive unless you need 200 + rounds per hour capability just get a Lee classic turret. If you load as many calibers as you say I doubt you will ever sit down a load 1000 of a caliber in one sitting anyway which is the only real reason to buy any progressive
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Old January 26, 2013, 10:25 AM   #7
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Ike,

As Bubbacrabb said, there's a micrometer adjuster available for the Dillon measure, so you can just dial in your load setting. Not inexpensive, so if you have machine tool skills, you might want to try making your own. The aftermarket one is here.


GWS,

Thanks for an excellent rundown of pro's and cons in operating the presses.
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Old January 26, 2013, 11:08 AM   #8
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I have my Dillon XL650 for my heavy work such as .45, .223, .308, and 30-06. I have a single stage for the light work such 45-70, .44 Mag, .303, 7.65 mm, etc. I am very happy with the Dillon, even though it had some minor growing pains.
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Old January 26, 2013, 11:08 AM   #9
BigTex308
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Thanks for all the replies.




Quote:
"Here's the thing: Dillons are super duper for what they are made for....to make IPSC and IDPA shooters very happy.....set up the competition caliber and load like hell. But you can change calibers on a Pro 2000, including primer size, in the time it takes a Dillon 650 owner to change primer size. Changing primer size on my press takes 8 seconds without practice. I often load two calibers in one evening session, and sometimes three.
That's kind of what I'm seeing from looking at my 550. I Haven't mounted it yet but it looks like that's what it's geared for.



Quote:
If you like CCI primers, then buying preloaded APS strips of them is the fastest and safest way to prime period. Changing primers is simply grabbing a different box. (and maybe an 8 second primer rod change if needed) No tubes to load...ready to go already. No tubes to explode either. If you prefer other brands of primers, the loading primers into strips is about the same as pecking primers into tubes. This is RCBS's APS system."

I do use CCI primers so that is a plus.



Quote:
"The tool (die) heads for the pistol calibers I have set up are populated with dies, in ready-adjustment for that caliber....which includes powder dies, and bullet feeder dies."

That's the setup I have for my Lee right now. I have several sitting off press, so when I'm ready to change calibers I just take the tool head out, put the other in and change the powder disk. Takes no more than 5 mins, and that's running a few test rounds to make sure adjustments are still correct.





Quote:
"So you have a 550 and you assume it could be difficult to adjust? I dont really understand. If you have one you should be able to tell. They make an easy adjust knob for the powder measure thats made by an aftermarket company. My 550 does just fine on adjustments. I have 2 powder measures. one I use exclusively for all my pistol calibers, and one that I dedicated to rifle. It makes it a lot easier having a different tool head for each caliber for sure. The priming system can be a little pain, but usually with just some small adjustments and cleaning it works flawlessly for a long while til it needs it again."
I picked up my 550 2 hours before I started this thread. After my first inspection of it, it appears that it would be difficult to change loads. I may have to consider that adjustment tool. That would make it a lot easier to dial in a charge.



Quote:
"Sadly, this does not help you much unless you might consider the Lee Classic Turret (which is what I switched to when I decided I did not like fussing with my Pro-1000 presses). I am much happier now. But that is my loading style and quantity needs, not yours."

I actually switched from the classic turret to the Loadmaster. It's a good machine for what it is, just didn't suit my needs. Thanks for the reply.




Quote:
"Some people have had trouble with the priming system, I am lucky in that respect as its been trouble free for me. I just use a flux brush with a touch of powered graphite to dust the primer shuttle and pathway that it is in, as well as the primer seater plugs. Provides them with some sort of lubrication that won't contaminate primer or powders. Changing the primer seating plugs is kind of a pain st first, once you get the hang of it it gets alot simpler. I put a very light layer of anti seize compoud on the threads on the seater plugs every now and again as it seemed to help installation and removal. One thing you will want to do is put something like a round cutout from an electrical conduit box or a dime beneath the primer seater plug. The press is aluminum, the seater plug is steel (at least the part that makes contact with the press is), you will get a divit in the press that will eventually make it impossible to seat primers correctly. The piece underneath the seating plug fixes this and should ever need to be...easily replaced. Use a small touch of plumbers putty, caulk or even toothpaste to hold this piece in place.

One thing that most likely WILL happen with the priming system is if you have a powder spill, even a few specks of powder...if it gets in the pathway will give you problems. I have seen where some people will use cans of compressed air to blow out the path. I prefer to not send powder particles everywhere...I use a little egg of silly putty to collect whatever is iin there. Its grabs loose items and doesn't leave anything behind. After that I give it a quick brushing with the graphite again."
Thanks for the input!




Quote:
on the LnL if you keep the priming system clean it is fantastic, but a few grains of powder in the wrong place it is a nightmare. This whole thing has been beat to death on a half a dozen threads recently, I suggest doing a search and reading a few of them

as far as a progressive unless you need 200 + rounds per hour capability just get a Lee classic turret. If you load as many calibers as you say I doubt you will ever sit down a load 1000 of a caliber in one sitting anyway which is the only real reason to buy any progressive"

Thanks for the input! I'll have to do a search and read some past threads.

I load: .380acp, 9mm, .38/.357, .40S&W, .41mag, .44mag, .45acp, .45colt and .223

on my progressive right now. I load a bunch of rifle calibers as well but I use my rock chucker for those because I make precision loads and like to keep it simple.


I shoot IDPA so sometimes I need quite a bit in a short amount of time. I also load for a few friends that shoot with me as well and they like different loads so I have several high volume needs with different charges and calibers. I also load for a few friends that just like to go target shooting/ plinking and they all like different loads out of their guns so I have several combos per caliber.


I actually sold my classic turret to get the Loadmaster. Good little press, I just needed more volume.





Quote:
"Ike,

As Bubbacrabb said, there's a micrometer adjuster available for the Dillon measure, so you can just dial in your load setting. Not inexpensive, so if you have machine tool skills, you might want to try making your own. The aftermarket one is here.


GWS,

Thanks for an excellent rundown of pro's and cons in operating the presses."

Thanks for the link!


And X2 on that GWS!





Thanks again for all the input guys!



Ike

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Old January 26, 2013, 12:49 PM   #10
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UncleNick, Ike, you're welcome, thanks for the compliment.....if you ever get the urge to try a Pro 2000, you're always welcome to P.M. or email me to pick what brain I have left on the subject.

Quote:
The tool (die) heads for the pistol calibers I have set up are populated with dies, in ready-adjustment for that caliber....which includes powder dies, and bullet feeder dies. Slide on, drop in two pins, drop the powder measure on...all set to load.
Quote above is from my first post. I feel like that statement needs expanded, since you plan to load rifle as well. The Pro 2000 tool head is different than the Dillon versions because station 3 is on the press not on the tool head. Some wrongly consider that a disadvantage, thinking that you have to mount the Uniflow there.........you don't.....but if want to for rifle there is an advantage not available to Dillon users.

With the Uniflow mounted stationary, off the tool head, you don't have to buy separate powder dies or powder measures for rifle bottleneck cartridges. Just leave the powder die there, or if you prefer, while loading pistol, remove it and replace it with a lock-out die. It'd really be cool if the hole was the bigger size and a LnL bushing could be used...but no room for that. Minor thing though. Screwing to a lock nut is simple enough.

Besides grabbing another tool head, and changing primer rod size if needed, dropping the right drop tube for your caliber in the stationary powder die, dropping the measure on, and a quick readjustment of the mic, is all you have to do to change from one rifle caliber to another.
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Old January 26, 2013, 12:57 PM   #11
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If you like the Lee powder measure then install it on the 550 with the Lee powder/expander die. Lots of people use the Lee pro auto disk on Dillon presses. I run a Lee classic turret and Dillon 550. I don't think the Dillon measure is that hard to adjust or that hard to change calibers on.
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Old January 26, 2013, 12:58 PM   #12
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Hello all, I've got to chime in here.

I gotta say the dillon 550 with NO case feeder once properly set up is IMO the best running press out there! And super fast on caliber changes even with changing primer size. However, I will say with the case feeder it's a pain in the ass. If you don't have to change the shell plate it's easy like going from 9 to 40 just swap the tool head and the adapter on the feeder tube. Literally a 2 min change. Now I've used both hornady and the rcbs and the reason I stay with dillon is because of there priming and powder drop systems. If you would blow a primer when seating it WILL NOT affect the other primers in the tube. The biggest thing is how accurate and consistent the powder drop is. It is very easy to adjust the powder charge even without the add-ons. Don't get me wrong hornady and rcbs make great presses but for me the dillon just works out better. I am a big competitive shooter as well as an instructor and ill load a few thousands rounds on one caliber until I change. The dillon is a tad touchy setting it up but once it's dialed in man it's wonderful! Just keep it clean and lubed. The only other thing I had issues with was when I first got my dillon I was using rcbs and lee dies. The flare on the bottom of the die wasn't big enough and sometimes I had to guide the case into the die. I've now switched to hornady new dimension and dillon dies and problem solved. I also gotta say those hornady dies are amazing and cheaper than dillons too.
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Old January 26, 2013, 03:10 PM   #13
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Quote:
UncleNick, Ike, you're welcome, thanks for the compliment.....if you ever get the urge to try a Pro 2000, you're always welcome to P.M. or email me to pick what brain I have left on the subject.

Quote:
The tool (die) heads for the pistol calibers I have set up are populated with dies, in ready-adjustment for that caliber....which includes powder dies, and bullet feeder dies. Slide on, drop in two pins, drop the powder measure on...all set to load.
Quote above is from my first post. I feel like that statement needs expanded, since you plan to load rifle as well. The Pro 2000 tool head is different than the Dillon versions because station 3 is on the press not on the tool head. Some wrongly consider that a disadvantage, thinking that you have to mount the Uniflow there.........you don't.....but if want to for rifle there is an advantage not available to Dillon users.

With the Uniflow mounted stationary, off the tool head, you don't have to buy separate powder dies or powder measures for rifle bottleneck cartridges. Just leave the powder die there, or if you prefer, while loading pistol, remove it and replace it with a lock-out die. It'd really be cool if the hole was the bigger size and a LnL bushing could be used...but no room for that. Minor thing though. Screwing to a lock nut is simple enough.

Besides grabbing another tool head, and changing primer rod size if needed, dropping the right drop tube for your caliber in the stationary powder die, dropping the measure on, and a quick readjustment of the mic, is all you have to do to change from one rifle caliber to another.


That is interesting. I may just have to look into that. I have a rockchucker and partner and a ton of RCBS dies. I'm a big fan of RCBS. I hadn't really taken that clos of a look at the pro 2000. Thanks again for the input.




Ike
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Old January 26, 2013, 03:49 PM   #14
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wasn't sure if I could find this but luckily it cam up on first search


a good review of Hornady vs Dillon by someone who owns both

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=478475

I have gotten into the habit now of running stuff in batches even on the progressive. I will pre clean 1000 or so cases, the 223's I will lube and full lenth size then re clean and prime. I will just put on some music and load up some tubes and use the LnL to size flare and prime pistol cases in one step them store them doing the powder and bullets later. When I need ammo I will use the LnL to do the powder, seat the bullet and crimp. Sometimes I just decap and size then prime using a hand primer while watching TV in the house.

Right now I have enough cleaned and primed cases to last me several months, I cleaned the last of my dirty cases yesterday. I keep about 500 or so of most calibers loaded and when I shoot some I just wash and prep the cases for my next loading session. Without counting I bet I have closer to 2 K of 9mm range ready simply because that is what I shoot the most of


This method might not be for everyone and some may say why even bother having a progressive but it sure fits me to a T. I like it because I never feel hurried, have to worry about a partially deprimed case causing a double charge, or spilled powder gumming up the priming station.
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Old January 26, 2013, 04:16 PM   #15
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GWS

Thank you for the run down on the two presses. I use Dillon and worked for them in years past but would like to keep and use your evaluation if I may?
I get asked about presses quite often and you made some good points for the Hornaday that I did not know, never using one I would just say I did not have any experience with it. But with your permission, all I need to do is give them a print out of your message.


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Old January 26, 2013, 04:36 PM   #16
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Hounddawg, there you go! It fits you to a "T." That's the goal. The closer a person looks at how each press works, you'll find advantages that may even appear to be disadvantages to someone else. You load in large batches. I don't tend to do that....but I can if I need to.

More typical for me is a call from one of my Grand sons on late Thursday, who wants to know if I'd take him shooting on Saturday, and I'm fresh out of what he's wanting to shoot. So Friday after work I need to load up a quick 100 each of .223, .45ACP, and .40S&W (plinking rounds with cheap bullets) For that, I have just the right equipment to do it stress free, and still watch a late movie on my big screen. I'm happy, my grandsons are happy, and most importantly my wife is happy.

I'd surely be just as happy with 3 Dillons set up....except that's more expensive, takes up more room, and doesn't have APS.

So a guy ought to do his own homework, and find the best fit for himself and his lifestyle. Then there will be no regrets.

edward5759, be my guest....but I'd print the whole thread. Others have some great comments. Far as I know what's posted here is not copyrighted by posters......maybe by Firing Line Forums....
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Old January 26, 2013, 04:47 PM   #17
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I use these from home depot.
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Old January 26, 2013, 04:49 PM   #18
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Once you set your Dillon up, you'll forget you had a dilemma!
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Old January 26, 2013, 07:32 PM   #19
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Well GWS I think I would have been just as happy with a Pro 2000, the APS really had me leaning toward it instead of the Hornady for awhile, cost of the Hornady won me over in the end though. For that matter though I think if I had it to do over I would have just bought a CH4D for my precision rifle stuff and kept running my pistol and .223 off the Lee Classic Turret
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Old January 27, 2013, 04:45 AM   #20
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BIGTEX, sorry bud, didnt know you only had it for a few hours. Its not bad. I'd start fiddling with if I was you. the only way to learn is jump in the water and sink or swim bud. Its pretty simple though. What I do, and I'm just an average guy is I throw in the powder, run the powder measure about 10 times just dumping the powder back in the hopper, then shoot for my powder weight. Once I get it I check it 5 times or so, then run 100 loads or so and do a quick check again, do 100 more etc. I've never had mine go out of adjustment, but just check to sleep better at night.
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Old January 27, 2013, 11:06 PM   #21
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my first progressive was lee pro 1000 and for the price and going slow it was ok but the priming system sucked. but i now have rcbs pro 2000 and it's sure one nice machine. priming strips work well you can change calibers pretty quick . all you have to do is remove the die head and change shell plate. it's not dificult i love my 2000 .
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Old January 27, 2013, 11:12 PM   #22
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adjusting the powder on the pro 2000 is simple and dosen't take a lot of time just turn a nob to adjust
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Old January 28, 2013, 07:50 AM   #23
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It’s not my intention to get into a green vs red, vs blue debate. I’m just offering my personal experiences.

I’ve had a Dillon SDB for more than 20 years. Yes it has its limits, but I really like the machine. It has never given me any problems. It runs like a fine tuned Swiss watch.

In December of last year I decided that I wanted to begin progressive reloading for 223 and 308. Previously I had been single stage loading for those. Time to upgrade. I knew the quality of the Dillon, but was curious if RCBS, Lyman, or Hornady had a progressive press that would be less expensive than a Dillon, and at the same time perform as well as a Dillon. I kept coming back to the Hornady Lock-N-Load AP. Reviews as usual were mixed, but I decided to try one, (without the case feeder) and maybe save a few $$$ in the meantime. Unfortunately, it didn’t workout that way. At least not for me.

I made my purchase with the understanding that I could return the press within a week or so, if it did not meet my expectations. It did not. With the help of another forum user, I made many mods and adjustments to the L-N-L, but it just never did perform like I had expected. I was having the primer feeding issue that many have had, as well as a shell plate timing issue. No amount of fine tune adjusting solved the problem. And believe me, I tried. For a week I tried. I also had a problem with the Lock-N-Load bushings not staying locked. Especially at the powder dump station. The shell spring retention is a good idea, but just isn’t up to snuff IMO. There is a reason they sell the replacement springs in packs of 3. The 2 things I did like about the L-N-L were the powder measure, and the ergonomics of the machine. The Dillon XL 650 would be a nightmare without the motorized Case Feeder IMO.

I replaced the L-N-L with a Dillon XL 650, with Motorized Case Feeder, and I couldn’t be happier. It just works, and in the end, it’s really not that much more expensive than the L-N-L, if you plan on adding the case feeder. I have run thousands of 223 and 308’s thru the machine with no primer feeding issues, no case feeding issues, no ejection issues. It runs as smooth as my SDB. Caliber change over is a little more time consuming, and more expensive than that of the L-N-L. But in the end, my production rate was much higher with the XL 650 over the L-N-L.

I’ve used Lee, Lyman, RCBS (still have a RCBS Jr), Hornady, and Dillon. In my opinion the Dillon machines are a step, or two, above the rest. Like I said in previous posts, some folks have had great success with the L-N-L, unfortunately I did not. Are the Dillon machines perfect? Of course not. But from my research, the Dillon machines seem to have way less issues than the others. My advice is for you too purchase the machine of your choice, with the understanding that you can return it, if it doesn’t work as you expected. I hope this helps.


Take care, and be safe.
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Old January 29, 2013, 01:55 AM   #24
BigTex308
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Join Date: October 26, 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 259
Thanks for all the input so far. It is GREATLY appreciated

I went to my reloading supply shop today and got a hands on look at the Lock N Load AP and Pro 2000.


I'm kinda leaning towards the 2000 at the moment.


I like the fact that on the powder throw it has adjustments marks on it, rather than just a screw to turn. I thought the Hornady had this too, but actually it's just a screw. It'll make it easier to "dial in" on my powder charge. If course I'll still run a few cases through to verify like I always do but it will definatley help.


It looks like they make a auto-indexing version of the Pro 2000 which is a high priority feature for me.

I like RCBS I have several of their single stage presses and have been very satisfied with them so far. especially their warranty.

If I do go with the Pro 2000 a larger hopper will be in the future. Also I noticed their tool heads are a bit pricey. I can live with that though.


It's close between the AP and Pro 2000 but I'm leaning towards the pro 2000.



I'll still be doing more research and considering.


I'll probably have to delay the purchase for a little while cause I have a honeymoon to pay for in a few months. Not to mention the 4 AR builds I need to complete.


So many projects ad not enough cash to go around




Ike
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Old January 30, 2013, 12:11 AM   #25
GWS
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Join Date: September 8, 2010
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 467
Good luck with your press search.....and the AR builds. Must be nice. I may have waited too long to get a .223 version of the AR. I only have an AR10 clone, and a gorgeous stainless on wood, Mini 14....one of the originals. I won't be selling this one.



So's we don't sidetrack your thread, how about a p.m. sometime, on how you go about building an AR from scratch. Congratulations on the coming "Getting Hitched" party!!!
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