The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: Bolt, Lever, and Pump Action

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 28, 2013, 11:31 AM   #1
SC4006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 27, 2012
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 327
How precise are the Mosin Nagant's elevation adjustments?

I know that every mosin is just a little different, but generally speaking how accurate are the elevation adjustments on the rear sight of the 91/30 specifically? So I.e. if you set them to 1000m and you were somehow able to see your target without a scope, would the bullet impact anywhere near where you were aiming? I don't even really get why the russians made it adjustable to out past say 600 meters, never mind 2000, did they really expect soldiers to be using iron sights out to 2000m?
__________________
Army National Guard Infantry Nov. 2013 - Pesent

They say 5 out of 4 people are bad at math, but what do I know?
SC4006 is offline  
Old January 28, 2013, 11:38 AM   #2
kraigwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 9,440
I've only shot mine to 400 yards (longest my personal range goes).

Once I got the sight adjusted where it hits at 100 yards when it's set on the 100 mark, its on at 200, 300 and 400.

Maybe this spring I'll take it out and see how it works at farther distances.
__________________
Kraig Stuart
CPT USAR Ret
USAMU Sniper School Oct '78
Distinguished Rifle Badge 1071
kraigwy is offline  
Old January 28, 2013, 11:58 AM   #3
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 11,448
Quote:
I don't even really get why the russians made it adjustable to out past say 600 meters, never mind 2000, did they really expect soldiers to be using iron sights out to 2000m?
It was not for precision aimed fire. Like many rifles of the late 1800s, the Mosin Nagant rifle was designed to be used to stop enemy troop advancements. As such, it was supposed to be used for "volley fire", to fire on enemy troop formations from as far as you could see them, often a mile or more away, taking out as many as you could to reduce the number of troops charging your position. A good idea at the time, sort of. Watching your comrades falling as you advance towards the enemy has a demoralizing effect, and it reduces the number of troops that will need to be repelled with bayonets. Since the early 1900s, this role is filled by machine guns, mortars, and light artillery.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old January 28, 2013, 12:36 PM   #4
SC4006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 27, 2012
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 327
Quote:
As such, it was supposed to be used for "volley fire"
oooh I didn't even think of that, makes sense.
__________________
Army National Guard Infantry Nov. 2013 - Pesent

They say 5 out of 4 people are bad at math, but what do I know?
SC4006 is offline  
Old January 29, 2013, 04:44 PM   #5
Erno86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 22, 2012
Location: Marriottsville, Maryland
Posts: 530
I believe the M91-30's iron sight P.O.I. were made to have with the bayonet attached; though I've never shot mine with the bayonet spike attached. You can add a piece of shrink tubing on the front sight post to make it shoot lower.
Erno86 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06685 seconds with 7 queries