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Old February 22, 2013, 11:00 AM   #1
ibmsteach
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Smith & Wesson 38 S&W Special CTG "V"

I need some info on this gun, as well as some suggested value:
Smith & Wesson 38 S&W Special CTG
Smith & Wesson Springfield, Mass. U.S.A.
Patented Feb 8 06 Sept 14 09 Dec 29 14 on top of barrel
Serial No. on bottom of butt: V115xxx
Trade Mark symbol worn on side

(The handles are a brownish orange; one side has rhinestones)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg montez gun serial.jpg (161.5 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg montez gun.jpg (244.8 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg montez gun side2.jpg (232.7 KB, 37 views)
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Old February 22, 2013, 11:14 AM   #2
Microgunner
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It's a WW2 "Victory" lend lease revolver sent to the Allies in Europe.

The hole in the butt is where the lanyard loop used to be.

Many have been repatriated.

Any collector's value yours may have had has been destroyed by chrome plating, obviously the grips and finish aren't original to the revolver.

They're still great shooters.
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Last edited by Microgunner; February 22, 2013 at 11:23 AM.
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Old February 22, 2013, 11:34 AM   #3
ibmsteach
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S&W Special CTG "V"

Thank you. Were any made with handles made like this particular one? Any clue as to its value?
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Old February 22, 2013, 11:51 AM   #4
Slamfire
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Your pistol is the reason all original WW2 Victory pistols have increased in value. They were ugly and rough looking and owners paid to have them reblued or nickled.

As a refinished victory revolver, aftermarket grips, your pistol has zero value to a collector. It has value as a shooter, but I am not going to estimate because prices are hard to predict.

I will say, if you carry the thing, load five and leave an empty under the chamber. These older S&W’s have an unreliable hammer block mechanism. The last picture shows the mechanism. It is a spring that can break or get gummed up moving out of position. If that spring is out of position and you drop the revolver on its hammer, that hammer can move forward and hit the primer causing a negligent discharge.
S&W changed the hammer block mechanism just for that reason.










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Old February 22, 2013, 11:58 AM   #5
carguychris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Microgunner
It's a WW2 "Victory" lend lease revolver sent to the Allies in Europe.
Not exactly. Those were chambered in .38 S&W. This one appears to be originally .38 Special, indicating that it was used by American forces.

The American ones are worth more to collectors in original condition, but the refinish on this one has (literally) wiped out any collector value.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibmsteach
Were any made with handles made like this particular one?
No, those appear to be cheap plastic vintage aftermarket. The original stocks were smooth non-checkered walnut, and were quite ugly, so they were frequently ditched by past owners. [EDIT] Sevens beat me to it with the pictures; they show what the original stocks looked like.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibmsteach
Any clue as to its value?
Somewhere in the $75-$175 range. It has no collectible value due to the modifications, which are immediately obvious to any seasoned S&W enthusiast, so its value is solely as a shooter. However, recent collector demand for all vintage S&Ws seems to have driven up the value of even the bottom-level "shooter-grade" guns in some areas, but this is highly dependent on the local market; this is the reason for the large value range.
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Old February 22, 2013, 12:54 PM   #6
5thShock
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From the looks of that thing it could have a story to tell that's far more interesting than long, sleepy hours of nightwatch at a defense plant. I hear guitars and brass, is that tequila?
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Old February 22, 2013, 04:49 PM   #7
RJay
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Nothing personal, but those have got to be some of the ugliest grips I have ever seen.
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Old February 22, 2013, 04:59 PM   #8
Sevens
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Quote:
[EDIT] Sevens beat me to it with the pictures; they show what the original stocks looked like.
Double-EDIT: Sevens just now arrived at this thread and Slamfire deserves the credit for that terrific post and great pictures!

But hey, I love a shout-out!
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Old February 22, 2013, 05:11 PM   #9
spanishjames
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If the gun functions properly, and the bore is in good shape, my guess is you could sell that gun for $300.00. As others have said, to a collector (which I am not) it's not worth much, but to someone who wants a shiny shooter, it could sell for more. Maybe Montez was a general in the army, and the gun has a story to tell.
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Old February 22, 2013, 05:31 PM   #10
carguychris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevens
Double-EDIT: Sevens just now arrived at this thread and Slamfire deserves the credit for that terrific post and great pictures!
AAARGH!! That's the second time I've done that in the last 2 weeks or so!
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevens
But hey, I love a shout-out!
Glad you appreciate it though.
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Old February 22, 2013, 05:46 PM   #11
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FYI- The vast majority of Victory Models are in two varieties: a 4" version in 38 Special used in the US and a 5" version in 38 S&W (not Special) used by Great Britain.
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Old February 22, 2013, 06:52 PM   #12
ibmsteach
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S&W Special CTG "V" Comments

Thanks for all the comments...I'm not a gun collector, just someone trying to help the owner find some "true" information. I do appreciate all the responses, and I enjoyed reading them! Just so you all know:
The gun is NOT ugly.
Montez is an 80+ young lady.
The gun probably did enjoy some "night life" and some "bar time"......I'm sure it did have an interesting life.

Thanks again!!
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