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Old January 22, 2013, 06:56 PM   #1
4 Paws
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Colt Revolver Question

Came across a Colt revolver today at my local shop, and I didn't even know there was such a beast out there. It is a double action revolver, 4in barrel, chambered in 357, with the name Peacekeeper. The gun does not have the typical Colt royal blue finish, but rather a matte black almost powdercoat like finish. In speaking with a friend, it appears Colt may have put these out during a year or two in the mid 80's. The trigger pull is nothing like a Python or some of the other Colt revolvers I've handled. If anyone has some insight on this gun I would appreciate it.
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Old January 22, 2013, 08:45 PM   #2
DPris
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It was a strike gun, built for two years when most of Colt's master polishers were on strike.
Basically a lesser-finished version of Colt's last DA revolver line.
Denis

Edited To Add:
A strike-expedient version only, as soon as the strike was over the model was dropped.
Colt wanted to continue to offer a DA revolver during that strike, but didn't have enough polishers to keep on with previous "polished" versions.

Last edited by DPris; January 22, 2013 at 09:02 PM.
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Old January 22, 2013, 08:56 PM   #3
James K
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The Peacekeeper is not on the same action as the Python, it is on the new Mk III/V action, the same as the Trooper, but is, as you say, a plain matte finish version without any extra internal work. It was intended to compete with the S&W Model 28 (Highway Patrolman) which was S&W's low cost version of its N frame .357 Magnum.

The idea behind both guns was to provide a low cost revolver in .357 Magnum, without the costly internal work and high polish of the more expensive guns. (Those of us here might appreciate the quality of a Python compared with a Trooper or a Peacekeeper, but try explaining to a cash-strapped city council why your department needs to spend a couple of hundred dollars more per gun for a shiny finish!)

No, it is not a Python, but it is a solid, accurate and reliable .357 Magnum revolver.

Jim
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Old January 22, 2013, 09:40 PM   #4
Winchester_73
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If anyone has some insight on this gun I would appreciate it.
Well, few were made and I don't see these very often. I got the name confused with the "border patrol" model which was apparently a 38 special version of the MKIII trooper. The peacekeeper was a lesser finished version of a MKV trooper. IIRC it was Colt's employees who did finishing on the guns who went on strike, resulting in some lesser finished guns, such as this model. Many 1980s colt revolvers are valuable and sought after today compared to say 1970s examples for these reasons. All of the 80s Colt issues resulted in fewer revolvers made, which in turn results in higher values for many of them. An interesting piece and history, IMO.
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Old January 22, 2013, 09:48 PM   #5
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Thanks for the replies, the info is appreciated. I know prices can vary depending on location, but if this piece can be had for $500 or less would that seem reasonable? If it was anything other than a colt I probably wouldn't consider it. But as we know, these guns simply aren't being produced any longer.
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Old January 23, 2013, 11:39 AM   #6
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If......

it has the box and associated papers, buy it.

As Winchester 73 said, they only made these for two years. They are representative of a piece of Colts history. They may not be that superb finish that most Colts are known for, but they were small in production numbers.

Buy it and put it away. You will not regret it down the road.
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Old January 23, 2013, 01:07 PM   #7
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Sounds like a good knock around gun, well suited to outdoor use with less than scrupulous cleaning and oiling in the field. A sort of modernized version of the Colt Commando .38 of WW2.

I've seen photos of Green Berets and SOG carrying the Colt Python in the field, and a friend who was a medic in Nam carried a Colt .38 his dad sent to him.
While not a gun guy my friend also carried a Webley .380 when he returned stateside and worked at an emergency room in a bad neighborhood.

If the matt finish bothered the owner they could apply baking laquer finish.
I would first find out if the laquer could be removed at a later date without damage to the original matt finish.
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Old January 23, 2013, 01:47 PM   #8
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I would first find out if the laquer could be removed at a later date without damage to the original matt finish.
If the value of a Colt revolver that was made for only a couple of years is to be preserved, applying any kind of "after-market" coating would not only detract from its worth but, imo, would be virtually impossible to restore to its original matte finish. If the original matte finish "bothered the owner" enough so that he might consider having the finish changed, my advice to him would be to sell/trade it for something more to his liking-and let an appreciative Colt aficionado enjoy the revolver for what it is and for what it was intended to be.
Of course, if he owns it, he can do what he darn well pleases with it.
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Old January 25, 2013, 10:41 PM   #9
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The Peacekeeper did not have less polish and a dull look because of disgruntled Colt employees - it was intended to be that way for reasons I mentioned. Polishing costs money and when a factory puts out a highly polished gun the customer pays for it. So if a factory can gain sales for a homely gun, they will make a homely gun. My Model 28 is just as smooth and shoots as well as my "high priced spread" Model 27, but cost (IIRC) about 1/3 less. To a police department, that is a big difference. (And to a police officer, a nice shiny gun might not be such a good idea, anyhow.)

Jim
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Old January 26, 2013, 09:34 AM   #10
Mike Irwin
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Actually, $500 for a good condition Peacekeeper, especially in today's climate, is not all that bad a price.
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