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Old January 22, 2013, 05:08 PM   #1
BoogieMan
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Max cartridge length

I am trying to reload 125gr lead roundnose in 9mm using power pistol. Allient sent me charge weights but did not send me cartridge length. Where would I obtain that information? Is there any standardization to bullet profiles/lengths?
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Old January 22, 2013, 05:14 PM   #2
Magnum Wheel Man
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you should pick up a good loading manual, the COL's are normally in each bullets load data...
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Old January 22, 2013, 05:25 PM   #3
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I have the lyman 49th manual. Does not list a 125 round nose lead. I will have a lee manual also when my press finaly gets here. Right now just trying to get the info or at least find where the info can be found.
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Old January 22, 2013, 05:30 PM   #4
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No standard answer because the makers don't all use the same profile for the tip and ogive. Hornady has a shorter, more blunt shape than Speer, for example, so a Hornady RNFMJ has a recommended COL of 1.090", while the longer Speer of the same weight has a recommended COL of 1.135". A military version is often seated to 1.165" or so.

With lead its the same thing, with some being short hemispherical nose designs and some having longer elliptical profiles. Call the maker for a recommendation or post a picture and tell us how long it is. If it has a crimp groove, then the COL is determined by that. Also, the bearing surface (the cylindrical portion behind the nose that is full groove diameter) often tells you. The front edge of the bearing surface is usually sticking out about 0.020" beyond the case mouth.
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Old January 22, 2013, 06:06 PM   #5
poline
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Min OAL

(USE the following AT YOUR OWN RISK. Neither the writer, The Firing Line, nor the staff of TFL assume any liability for any damage or injury resulting from use of this information) Lee manual caution: With never exceed loads maintain MOAL or longer. It list 125 gain [Jacketed bullet] with POWER PISTOL: Minimum Over All Length as 1.150
The manual does not give a listing for POWER PISTOL with the [LEAD
ROUND NOSE!] This manual is 2007 copyright.
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Old January 22, 2013, 06:23 PM   #6
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@poline- thank you for the info. I wonder if that same info is in the Lee manual they are currently shipping with kits.

@Unclenick- I e-mailled the bullet manufacturer. Hopefully they will get back to me soon. This is the bullet im refering to http://store.midatlanticbullets.com/...e-1-1-1-5.aspx
It does have a lube groove. Do you mean that it should be seated over the lube groove even with the edge of the major OD? You also mentioned the crimp. I have read this but never noticed it on factory ammo. Auto cases head space from the front. The crimps must be very light in order to allow that.
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Old January 22, 2013, 06:56 PM   #7
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It has a lube groove, but it has no crimp groove. That would be a smaller groove with no lube in it just up near where the the step, or shoulder to the nose portion of the bullet is if it had one. That shoulder should stick forward about 0.020" in normal seating.
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Old January 22, 2013, 07:09 PM   #8
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Judging from the picture of the bullets, it's pretty clear that the bullet has to be seated with the mouth of the case somewhere between the lube groove and the shoulder of the bullet.
So, how about seating the bullet at the max distance where that occurs?
Then see if it runs in the magazine ok, and the loaded round chambers ok.
If not, shorten the loaded round a bit until it does.
As for the crimp, use the least amount that allows reliable feeding, just enough to provide some grip of the case to the bullet.
Hope this helps.
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Old January 22, 2013, 07:20 PM   #9
BoogieMan
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How critical is seating depth OAL as it pertains to cartridge presure. Is it like +-.002 or more like +-.020? I undersatnd the isue in regards to cycling just not how much effect it has on cartridge presure.
I appreciate the patience you guys have shown with my questions. You guys have been a big help.
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Old January 22, 2013, 07:30 PM   #10
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The seating depth and internal volume becomes more important the hotter the load.
Since it's hard to tell pressures, the safest approach is to load bullets long and with moderate powder amounts.
There's other causes of high pressures, too, like too much crimp and too long of bullets that are tight against the rifling without any jump from case to barrel.
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Last edited by g.willikers; January 22, 2013 at 07:37 PM.
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