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Old February 3, 2013, 11:34 PM   #1
REM1
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Wireless humidity meter for gun safe

Can anyone recommend a good Wireless Humidity Meter for monitoring from outside of a gun safe?

Thank you.
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Old February 3, 2013, 11:36 PM   #2
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I would say that any wireless unit would work..but, IDK.

Are you having problems?
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Old February 3, 2013, 11:41 PM   #3
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No. We ordered two gun safes for our company and getting ready for installation. I couldn't find IDK on the net. Could you please provide a web link?

Thank you.
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Old February 3, 2013, 11:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
I couldn't find IDK on the net.
Sorry...I don't know = IDK.

Last edited by shootniron; February 3, 2013 at 11:48 PM.
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Old February 3, 2013, 11:44 PM   #5
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Ok, Thank you for checking.
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Old February 3, 2013, 11:45 PM   #6
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In my experience, if you have central heat and air, there is not really a problem. However, you may be in an area with extremely high humidity and that could have more effect. Again...IDK.
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Old February 3, 2013, 11:50 PM   #7
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Besides being in a humid environment the rooms are kept cold for electrical equipment and we want to monitor for above reasons.
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Old February 4, 2013, 11:31 PM   #8
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You might just consider getting desiccant packs from McMaster Carr and see how those do.

Its been a while but I think they have ones that change color when saturated and you can cook out the moisture and use again.

You could buy a Hygrometer and put in the safe and check the level once in a while until you establish you are ok and then base the re-fresh on how the media is doing and trend is going. Establish a safe (pun) time period that is under the high limit you want and just change it based on that.

Your environment definitely calls for precautions.

You would have to drill a hole in the safe for the antennae though as no wireless is going to make it thorough steel.

Last edited by RC20; February 4, 2013 at 11:36 PM.
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Old February 5, 2013, 12:09 AM   #9
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If the room is kept cold all of the time it should not present a major problem as it would with changing temperatures. I have kept guns in several places with varying temps and never had a problem so you situation will not be difficult to handle.
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Old February 5, 2013, 12:43 AM   #10
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Thank you RC20 & SHOOTNIRON. The temps fluctuate. A Hydrometer with close monitoring seem very logical. I will be placing a new order for the safe tomorrow. We are also on an island. I will be ordering a Liberty Safe heating wand and one of those Remington Model 500 Wireless Mini Dehumidifiers. I will also look at the desiccant packs from McMaster Carr as well if the humidity is unmanageable. These are duty weapons so we coat them with oil and then wipe them completely dry once a week.
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Old February 5, 2013, 11:20 AM   #11
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I wonder whether a wireless remote humidity meter would send the signal through heavy safe walls.
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Old February 5, 2013, 11:49 AM   #12
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Yes I was thinking the same thing. That is why I originally posted. After the post I found some rather powerful commercial grade ones, but I don't think I want that in a home environment. I'll just leave one inside and check it now and then more often until I know what to expect. Though the wireless with an alarm would of been nice.

Thx for posting.
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Old February 5, 2013, 03:28 PM   #13
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If you have a decent digital multi meter, you can get UEI or FieldPiece attachments that will work with it to give humidity readings. I have a UEI meter that runs the Fieldpiece Humidity head for it, which was 40 bucks at my local Johnstone Supply (which are everywhere and an HVAC supply house). I did have to buy a set of new leads for my multi-meter that had removable lead tips which plug into the meter and the Humidity head. Not something that you would want to leave on in your safe, but very accurate and reasonably priced for occasional monitoring.
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Old February 5, 2013, 04:23 PM   #14
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I used to use something like this from Radio Shack for my guitars. Not the same unit I have but roughly the same price. I had a couple of the small units in the cases to watch the humidity levels in the cases when I had them stored.
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Old February 5, 2013, 04:32 PM   #15
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Forgot to mention the the Fieldpiece humidity head does also do temperature.

That unit from Radio Shack looks ok. I've bought a couple different table models before and have been asked many times to confirm customers tabletop Humidity monitors and I have found some to be right on the money and some total junk. It's kind of hit or miss there. If you have a buddy in the HVAC field ask him to confirm your tabletop model with his equipment for you. Or you could ask the heater/A/c guy to if you have one in your home for a furnace service ot A/C estimate etc.

There doesn't seem to be a correlation between price and accuracy. I have seen the 8 dollar units right on the money, and the 30 dollar ones similar to the RS model linked to, to be way off. So as I said, it's hit or miss there.
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Old February 5, 2013, 09:24 PM   #16
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Thank you Edward429451 & Bumnote. I am going to look at the radio shack unit and also research the field unit with Johnston Controls. The UEI units appear to be veruy accurate to check calibrations. Thank you again.

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Old February 6, 2013, 04:50 AM   #17
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Just one I bought off ebay. Indoor/outdoor temp and humidity. Works pretty good.

uploadfromtaptalk1360144014165.jpg

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk 2
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Old February 7, 2013, 12:21 PM   #18
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Something to keep in mind is that the electronic Hygrometers are iffy for accuracy. You can't get inexpensive electronics that are truly accurate.

The best ones are the old fashioned analog ones.

Don't get me wrong, we use the electronic ones, but I use the analog hygrometer to confirm the true humidity and in my system I can put in an offset value into the electronic unit that gets them correct (plus or minis and often 5% or more) (my humidity units in the computer room while stand alone not only allow you to, but insist you use a analog or sling hygrometer to confirm humidity and then put in the right offset).

http://www.lufftusa.com/tools/catego....cfm?catid=518

I think they were $150 or so.
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Old February 7, 2013, 08:49 PM   #19
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Quote:
The best ones are the old fashioned analog ones.
I have found this to be true. The analog ones are almost always very close.
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Old February 7, 2013, 09:00 PM   #20
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So what's a good humidity range to aim for when storing firearms?
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Old February 7, 2013, 09:28 PM   #21
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Museums say 25% to 65%. link (http://www.collectioncare.org/cci/ccier.html)
There is no single relative humidity range that is ideal for all museum objects. Recent work by the Rochester Institute of Technology's Image Permanence Institute shows that lowering the relative humidity (RH) and temperature (T) will greatly increase the life of plastics and other organic materials. Relative humidity (RH) should not fluctuate rapidly. For mixed collections, a non-fluctuating relative humidity above 25% and below 65% is recommended. Many museums have set their relative humidity at 45% and gallery temperatures between 65 and 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Lowering the temperature greatly increases the longevity of collections. However, lower temperatures are hard on visitors to the museum.

Relative Humidity
Fluctuating relative humidity (RH) causes stress on materials. Rapid humidity fluctuation damages a wider range of museum objects than does temperature change. A change in RH causes dimensional alteration in hygroscopic materials (for example, wood, ivory, skin, and other organic materials), resulting in warping, splitting, and delamination of sensitive materials. Seasonal slow drifts are less harmful to structures and objects than abrupt changes. High RH (above 65%) can cause mold growth and metal corrosion. Low RH (below 25%) can cause embrittlement of hygroscopic materials such as leather and paper.

However, if you are in a wet or dry climate, it may not be possible to maintain the ideal RH level. Try to set your relative humidity level so that it is stable somewhere between 25% and 65%. Above 65% mold will grow, more rapidly as the RH rises. Below 25%, the materials may lose structurally important water. If you cannot achieve even these levels, achieve a reasonable level that does not fluctuate. If this level is above 65%, make sure you have good air circulation and regular inspections for mold growth.

All metal except gold is susceptible to oxidation or corrosion. Prevention of corrosion or oxidation is the primary goal in caring for metal artifacts. Most corrosion is caused by moisture although certain chemicals can also play a role. The oils and acids that occur naturally on skin can be very damaging to metal artifacts. One of the simplest ways to help preserve your artifacts is to store them in a relatively dry environment. Typically metal artifacts should be stored in living areas which are much dryer then sheds garages or basements. Attics are generally too hot for most artifacts.

General rules:

* If you are unsure what to do seek professional guidance
* Do not attempt to clean or polish metal artifacts with out seeking professional advice
* Do not handle metal artifacts with bare hands, gloves should be used
* Generally speaking commercially available dip type tarnish removers should be avoided
* The use of spray-on lacquer or similar type coatings is seldom advisable
* Although some oxidation or corrosion may be damaging to an artifact, they may also add to the value. Restoring an artifact to its original condition is not always the prudent course of action.

Iron and Steel

This is one of the most common metals and is commonly found in firearms, bayonets and swords. Steel and iron, especially those having a bright polish, are very susceptible to rust. The fine polish of a sword blade can easily be permanently marred by touching the blade with bare hands. Always handle metal artifacts with clean cotton gloves. Steel artifacts may be preserved by keeping them oiled with light oil like 3 in 1 or the metal parts may be protected with a coating of wax, such as Johnson’s paste wax. Care should be taken to coat all areas; you may wish to consult a gun smith to help with disassembly of weapons.

Basic Preservation of Wood Artifacts

Wood is a relatively stable material to preserve. Wooden artifact can be maintained for years provided that some basic care and attention is given to their preservation.

* Store wooden items in your home where they are protected from extremes of temperature and humidity.
* Avoid direct sunlight or bright light which will fade finishes.
* Avoid all temptations to over clean or refinish wood items.
* The use of linseed oil or other oil based products on wood items is not required or recommended.
* If wood items are handled a protective coating of wax like Johnson’s paste wax may be applied.
* When oiling firearms take care not to get oil on the grips or stock.
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Old February 7, 2013, 09:35 PM   #22
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Thanks!
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Old February 8, 2013, 12:26 AM   #23
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Thank you everyone. I truly appreciate all the feed back. This is going to save me a lot of trial and errors?

REM1
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Old February 8, 2013, 03:01 PM   #24
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I think as long as its below 65% you are ok.

Keep in mind a sudden temp change can cause condensation, so its really keeping safely back from a condensing stage.

55% should be doable in a close cabinet (safe) with a desiccant pack.

It will take some time to get down after closure but an analog will also be slow to react so if you open it up to check, you will see what its been staying and it will not jump to what the room humidity is.
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Old February 8, 2013, 03:07 PM   #25
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Not for the interal cabinet humidity, however for your external environment that you breath I read it is unhealthy to have a humidity under 35%. That 35% to 50% is ideal for health reasons. However I think for inside of the storage cabinet/safe even a lower humidity is best.
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