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Old January 18, 2013, 09:48 AM   #1
Z400ACDC
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Those SS revolvers are just sexy.

I bought a SS Ruger Service Six from my father in law that he bought new in 1978. It looks like new with less than 10 rounds through it. I have shot mostly autos and I shoot them more accurate. I want to get better with the revolver. Any advice?
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Old January 18, 2013, 09:57 AM   #2
Dan-O
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Dry fire the hell out of it.
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Old January 18, 2013, 10:57 AM   #3
CPO15
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Gun Digest Book of the Revolver by Grant Cunnigham. Lot of stuff on trigger technique, sight control, grip methods. No "war stories".
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Old January 18, 2013, 10:58 AM   #4
rclark
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Shoot it .... a lot. Best way to get better is run a lot of ammo through it .... while aiming at a target of course .
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Old January 18, 2013, 11:29 AM   #5
Z400ACDC
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I read in the manual that it was OK to dry-fire. But, how much can the firing pin take? I don't want to break it.
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Old January 18, 2013, 11:44 AM   #6
Dan-O
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It can take more than your finger can dish out.
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Old January 18, 2013, 01:56 PM   #7
Whirlwind06
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IMO spend the 10 dollars on a set of snap caps, if you plan on doing thousands of dry fire trigger pulls.

Drying firing won't hurt but I really doubt the Ruger had someone sitting in front of the TV for an hour a night in mind when they stated dry firing is okay.

Edit to add:
Oh yeah here is a pic of one of mine

Last edited by Whirlwind06; January 18, 2013 at 02:14 PM.
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Old January 18, 2013, 02:05 PM   #8
Rainbow Demon
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Be sure the gun is well lubed. I've found that revolvers that were excessively dry fired when not well lubed can accumulate wear to moving parts besides the more commonly recognized possibility of damage to firing pin or hammer nose.
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Old January 18, 2013, 02:44 PM   #9
MrBorland
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Quote:
I want to get better with the revolver. Any advice?
Cool Lessee...Here are some, in no particular order...

Dry fire

Live fire

Learn to shoot it double action

Get an action job if the action's gritty

Don't get in the bad habit of staging the trigger

Include ball & dummy drill to diagnose a flinch

Grip it high

Use an appropriate bullseye-type target (rather than a silhouette) when shooting for groups

Find a good revolver shooter in your area who's willing to spend some time with you at the range.

Start shooting matches with it
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Old January 18, 2013, 03:07 PM   #10
Dan-O
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Found this on Rugerforum.net, and if anyone knows a thing about Ruger double actions, it's Iowegan. He wrote IBOK...if anyone doesn't know what this is, just google it.

Originally Posted by Iowegan
... Now for "Snap-Caps". These have to be about the most worthless things ever made and even worse, they give the owner a false sense of security. Snap-Caps do absolutely nothing for the gun's internal parts. Yes, they do cushion the firing pin but they don't even do a good job of that. Ruger's firing pins are made of a copper and steel alloy that are nearly immune to breaking so it is very rare to see one break. Snap-Caps are worth using in the older single and double barrel shotguns where firing pins are more subject to breaking. In modern guns, they do absolutely nothing except to occupy space in the chamber instead of a live round.
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Old January 18, 2013, 03:26 PM   #11
Shotgun693
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Shooting a whole lot using poor techniques won't make you a good shot. Invest a few bucks in a shooting coach or instructor and learn the basics. THEN go shoot a lot.
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Old January 18, 2013, 04:09 PM   #12
CajunBass
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I read in the manual that it was OK to dry-fire. But, how much can the firing pin take? I don't want to break it.
If you manage to break it by dry-firing, brag about it.

You've done something not many other people have done.
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Old January 18, 2013, 05:29 PM   #13
Z400ACDC
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I will brag C-bass. I will brag if I can learn how to shoot it DA as well as my Sigs.
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Old January 18, 2013, 06:03 PM   #14
buck460XVR
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Be sure the gun is well lubed. I've found that revolvers that were excessively dry fired when not well lubed can accumulate wear to moving parts besides the more commonly recognized possibility of damage to firing pin or hammer nose.

This is why older, often shot revolvers have such smooth triggers. That "accumulated wear" as you put it, means all those parts that rub together as the trigger is pulled are polishing themselves. Years ago folks would suggest using tooth polish on those same parts while dry firing so they would smooth up quicker. Over lubing any firearm can make them attract and hold dirt and grit also, creating just as much, if not more wear, than shooting them dry. No real reason to have the firearm lubed any differently when dry firing it than when shooting it normally.
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Old January 18, 2013, 07:43 PM   #15
Japle
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No point using snap-caps. I’ve dry-fired my DA revolvers many tens of thousands of times in the last 40-odd years and not had a problem.

If you want to get really good in a practical way, do all your shooting DA.

And yes, stainless revolvers are sexy.


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Old January 18, 2013, 08:49 PM   #16
tomrkba
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The primary reason for using Snap-Caps is safety. It forces you to open the cylinder and verify there are no live cartridges in the chambers. One secondary purpose is to practice reloading the gun from speed loaders, moon clips and/or speed strips. Snap-Caps are necessary for S&W revolvers that have the frame mounted firing pin. I broke two firing pins on my N-Frames (within hundreds of pulls) before no longer believing what I was told. I never broke a firing pin after that. Rugers likely do not need it, but I use Snap-Caps for the first two purposes mentioned. Save a pair of underwear and be eco-friendly by using Snap-Caps!

In addition to Grant Cunningham's book, read:

No Second Place Winner by William Jordan
Fast and Fancy Revolver Shooting by Ed McGivern

Both books have additional tips and tricks for shooting revolvers. I find rapid fire extremely difficult with the revolver. It is a good challenge that I hope to one day master.

Last edited by tomrkba; January 18, 2013 at 09:00 PM.
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Old January 19, 2013, 08:48 AM   #17
Japle
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Quote:
Snap-Caps are necessary for S&W revolvers that have the frame mounted firing pin.
I'd be interested in knowing who told you that. S&W doesn't agree. Jerry M doesn't agree. I sure don't agree.
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Old January 19, 2013, 06:19 PM   #18
Rainbow Demon
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Quote:
This is why older, often shot revolvers have such smooth triggers.
And why some are complete wrecks with near irreplaceable parts worn past the carburized layer.
Quote:
That "accumulated wear" as you put it, means all those parts that rub together as the trigger is pulled are polishing themselves. Years ago folks would suggest using tooth polish on those same parts while dry firing so they would smooth up quicker.
I've used gunslick black grease for the purpose, but followed the instructions and cycled no more than six times before through cleaning and re lubing with regular gun grease or oil.
I would then detail strip and clean again after first trip to the range and always found some residue I'd missed.

Quote:

Over lubing any firearm can make them attract and hold dirt and grit also, creating just as much, if not more wear, than shooting them dry. No real reason to have the firearm lubed any differently when dry firing it than when shooting it normally.
True but "well lubed" does not mean sopping wet with oil, to me at least it means lubed properly and with fresh oil rather than oil thats gathered pocket lint and grit since last lubed.

There are conditions when no (oil or grease type) lube at all is best (for manually operated weapons), such as in a desert with windblown sand or high arctic where sub zero temps can congeal petroleum based oils.

In desert fighting troops sometimes covered the action of a bolt action rifle with a tube cut from a sock to keep out sand, and pistols were carried in a flap holster for good reason. Most sporting pistol holsters made for DA revolvers up through the 60's also had flaps to protect the mechanism from debris. A few service revolver holsters retained the flap as well.
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