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Old January 13, 2013, 06:25 PM   #1
cdoc42
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Primer question

I'm just getting into reloading .45 ACP. All my reference books list Fed 150 as the primer, which I can't find anywhere nearby. I'm using CCI 300 without apparent problems but I wondered if there was anything special to Federal 150?
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Old January 13, 2013, 06:45 PM   #2
Snobal
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I just started reloading in the 1960's --- so I don't know much.....

But....

I really have not found much difference in any brand of primer.

However, I never load to "max," I only load for accuracy.

Having said all that (too much), I did find one lot of standard CCI small rifle primers (in the late 1970's) that produced far better results (by my chronograph) that CCI "match" small rifle primers. I went out to all the local stores and bought all of that lot I could find (primers were about $9 per 1000 at that time, IIRC).

There is nothing "special" about Federal primers that I know of --- except that are soft and work great in a gun with a light hammer spring.

CCI primers are "hard" and require a sound hit with the firing pin to work well --- which is no problem in most rifles, but may be a problem in pistols set up with light springs for target shooting.

You should have no problem using data developed for Federal primers for the same rounds using CCI primers in a low-pressure round like .45 ACP.

JMHO - YRMV
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Old January 13, 2013, 08:06 PM   #3
NWPilgrim
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I use what is readily available locally at a decent price. That usually is Winchester or CCI. Sometimes Remington. I don't like Federal only because their sleeves are so large and thick and take up more storage room.

Even using the exact same components as listed you should work up from the starting load and test in increments anyway. More so if you change bullet, primer or COL.
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Old January 13, 2013, 08:11 PM   #4
m&p45acp10+1
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For large pistol I use any that I can get. If all I can find are magnum. I will back the load off to start and work my way back up. I have inter changed with magnum before without problems. Though I would advise if doing so to work back up. I would rather use a few primers up working back up to be safe than damage my gun.
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Old January 13, 2013, 08:20 PM   #5
Sevens
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Quote:
Even using the exact same components as listed you should work up from the starting load and test in increments anyway. More so if you change bullet, primer or COL.
Terrific advice, I want to spring-board from it.

I think a lot of people see a published load and look at it like it's the building instructions to a nuclear device. "This, this and this-this-and THIS all have to be _____ to do this."

Not true.

Published load data is basically a guideline, it's a detailed, published EXPERIMENT, usually backed by a proper laboratory with terrific, expensive equipment and professionals who are skilled to operate it and present the results.

They publish the bits because the bits are RELEVANT, not because they have to be specifically repeated. Example? Ambient temperature. Elevation above sea level. Barrel length. Mny even tell you the rifle unless it was developed in some kind of machine rig. All of these are absolutely relevant to the published experiment and are parts of what made up the result.

Just like the primer!
Ask yourself if you used the same headstamp of brass they used? They almost assuredly used factory new & unfired brass also...did you? Should you?

Naaa, not necessary.
Your best bet with published load data (no, not just you, all of us! ) is to see what they did and use the main components and start below their max -- by 10% or 15%, and use the same powder and a VERY similar bullet. Oh...and make sure we are talking about the same caliber they were running, too!

When you start low in a safe territory, it doesn't matter HOW much different your items are. Different brass? Different barrel? You at death valley while they worked the load up in the Alps?! Truth: it's okay, because you are starting low, observing the results, looking for signs of pressure, looking even more critically for signs of excessive pressure, and working safely toward your goal, whatever that may be.

In some cases... you do need a primer like the one they list. Magnum primers offer two things-- they give a hotter, longer burn and they come with a thicker, stronger cup to resist pressure leakage. In these cases, you do need to heed the suggestions. As to brand? Not to worry.

As long as you follow what NWPilgrim said, which is a cardinal rule in handloading, you'll make safe and successful loads.
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Old January 13, 2013, 08:22 PM   #6
Misssissippi Dave
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I have used several different brands of primers without problems. I don't load to max levels. I would consider using magnum primers if nothing else was available. You do have to work the load up again from the minimum and never go to maximum. Most powders do not require a magnum primer. I can't think of a single powder normally used in .45 that does. If you are concerned about using a different primer for a load you have worked up. Back off a few tenths of a grain and work it up again. I prefer to use Winchester primers in most cases. I have a bunch of Tula primers that I'm starting to use. YMMV.
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Old January 14, 2013, 01:14 AM   #7
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I have taken to using Winchester primers for my pistols, because it seems that they burn hotter than CCI's. Cleaner barrel with Winchester seems to indicate better burn of the powder.

Just my $.02
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Old January 14, 2013, 10:26 AM   #8
PA-Joe
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If you are using once fired brass, be careful cause they are now making 45 ACP cases that use small pistol primers.
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Old January 14, 2013, 01:46 PM   #9
edward5759
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.45 is a low pressure round so primers will not make a big difference.

I did get a hold of some bad primers that my 45 would go click then several seconds later it went boom!

I use the primers all up on people that I was instructing, who had a flinch

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Old January 15, 2013, 08:05 AM   #10
cdoc42
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Thanks to all - the value of these forums has been demonstrated!
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Old January 15, 2013, 12:07 PM   #11
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Quote:
I have taken to using Winchester primers for my pistols, because it seems that they burn hotter than CCI
They are hotter than the standard CCI primer, but not as hot as the Magnum CCI primer.

What I did is run tests with CCI-300 and CCI-350 (and WLP) on several powders back to back to see the difference over a chronograph. That put my mind at ease on the several common powders that I use, if I have to change primers due to primer availability, As alluded to above, the powder dictates what primer (not brand) you use (mag or regular). Some powders don't really care. Others need a magnum primer, others are sensitive to the primer and cause higher pressures when used. Sometimes loads are more consistent over the chrono with Magnum primers or visa-versa. Hence the wonderful world of testing .
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Old January 15, 2013, 12:19 PM   #12
lee n. field
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Quote:
I'm just getting into reloading .45 ACP. All my reference books list Fed 150 as the primer, which I can't find anywhere nearby. I'm using CCI 300 without apparent problems but I wondered if there was anything special to Federal 150?
"Large Pistol Primer" is what you want. Except for the few that use small primers.
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