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Old March 17, 2013, 10:53 PM   #1
starbuck125
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conversion on a 1851 brasser

Ok, me an the wife was gun shopping for her last friday at a local gunshop(), while we was there i noticed this 1851, with a conversion cylinder added to it. Now im by far i don't have that much knowledge of BP, but im learning a lil at a time. This leads me up to my maybe simple question(s), but i gotta know. This brass 51 navy colt , pittia, it being brass, could the brass take even low loads? i didn't ask the caliber of it, the price of it $399.00 scared me some. I know that with brass , you gotta keep your bp powder loads down, or you take the chance of the brass streching, etc.
Im not interested in but it, but was just wondering... Im asking cause i don't know how well the brasser would hold up to the stress.

Sorry for the spellin ya'll,..an thks,
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Old March 18, 2013, 04:38 AM   #2
Hawg
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Don't even think about it.
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Old March 18, 2013, 05:38 AM   #3
MJN77
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I have seen converted brass revolvers. Mostly remington copies. The conversion cylinder manufacturers highly suggest NOT putting them in brass guns.
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Old March 18, 2013, 09:00 AM   #4
Newton24b
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its called WADCUTTERS


thats basically what youd want to shoot based on frame strength. however you realize that the cylinder probably fits into other 1851s by the same company?
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Old March 18, 2013, 02:11 PM   #5
Rigmarol
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When I did my conversions the manufacturer (Kirst in my case) did not recommend installing their conversion (in my case .45colt) into a brass framed gun.

My opinion is, that is too much to pay for a brass frame Italian revolver. But, I'm picky that way.
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Old March 26, 2013, 12:35 AM   #6
TemboTusk
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.
I converted a 44 brass 1851 sheriff model with a Kirst Konvertor. I believe I shot almost a 800 Winchester Cowboy loads through it and a couple hundred BP loaded cases. Held up great... until the cylinder pin showed signs of crushing through the loading port area. The pin became loose in the direction of the loading port.

This pistol was my first conversion and I cut the loading port too deep and the stress of firing eventually pushed the cylinder pin through the overly thin loading port metal. I believe, the brass if cut properly, should hold up fine. It should no signs of stretching. Granted, a brass pistol will never be as strong as a steel frame pistol. I will leave a lot more meat on my next brass conversion.
.
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Old March 26, 2013, 08:09 AM   #7
Newton24b
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to tst the frame strength best, dont cut a loading port. youd be surprised. although i wish they were made with gun metal instead.
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Old March 26, 2013, 10:45 AM   #8
TemboTusk
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I know the brass 1851 in 44 is not historically accurate; however, they are such a beauty to look at. It is my favorite pistol and converting it allows me to shoot it more.
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Old March 26, 2013, 11:37 AM   #9
noelf2
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Quote:
I will leave a lot more meat on my next brass conversion.
So you did it once and after about 1k rounds the arbor (cylinder pin?) started coming off, and you plan to do it again? I would venture to say that the damage started after the first round you shot, and got worse and worse until the danger became obvious. It didn't just hold up great until round 1k. I think I would just have to suffer with looking at a steel frame for the Kurst Konverter on a second try.

I put an R&D cylinder in my New Model Army Buffalo (buntline) for a minute and was tempted, but gave in to the logic in manufacturer warnings and put it back in the steel one.
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Old March 26, 2013, 12:23 PM   #10
TemboTusk
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You are right, I think the damage was progressive and only became worse. After close inspection, I did cut the channel too deep and removed much of the strength in the direction of the channel. I have converted a steel 1851 and left much more metal and I would be very careful about the amount of metal removed from the next brass model.

I understand the manufacture's stand. A steel pistol would not have suffered the same consequences under the same conditions. At the price of the pistol, I think is worth trying again at least one more time.

Taking a file or Dremel to your pistol is not for the faint of heart and should not be undertaken lightly. Sometimes a few mistakes need to be made and holding that beautiful converted brass frame 1851 Navy Sheriff is worth trying again for me.
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