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Old January 8, 2013, 08:55 AM   #26
eldorendo
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There is no problem with a Glock in cold weather. Lots of Alaskan cops use Glocks. I'd just take the advice already given and keep the striker channel clean and dry, using NO lube there. I'd also recommend Mobil 1 100% synthetic oil for lubing with four-five small drops at the recommended spots.

Any further concerns about using Glocks in cold weather might better be addressed by a little psychotherapy and meds for OCD!
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Old January 8, 2013, 09:02 AM   #27
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So basically what I'm getting at is a Glock (polymer) is less likely to experience condenstation issues than an all steel revolver? Or is that not true.
The Nylon frame is not going to be affected by condensation whatsoever. Nothing-nada. Stop worrying, really.

Are you actually seeing any condensation form when you bring the gun inside? Can you post a picture? I honestly think that taking your gun apart every time you go inside and blowing it with a hair dryer is going to the extreme.
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Old January 8, 2013, 11:33 AM   #28
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Thank you. See no one has told me it won't be affected by it, so I assumed it would. If most answers where straight to the point like yours I probably wouldn't be asking this. Thanks
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Old January 8, 2013, 11:38 AM   #29
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That's all I needed to know. It may be over-thinking, but when people on this forum tell me "you MUST worry about condestation IT WILL HAPPEN" and plant they idea in my head then what am I suppose to think?. If you DIDN'T KNOW the answer (as I didn't) I'm sure you would be worried to - who wants a SD pistol if it doesn't work? I guess a few responses I got are what got me thinking too hard.

See people where telling me the gun "will jam/not work"
If bring it from cold to warm due to condenstation. That got me really thinking, hence the start of this thread.

It looks like the people who TOLD ME these things are wrong and probably more OCD than me by telling me that crap and me thinking it was true and I needed a way to fix this whole
"Condenstation issue"

Last edited by Josh17; January 8, 2013 at 11:43 AM.
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Old January 8, 2013, 02:09 PM   #30
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20-30 is nothing. Worry about it when it's -30 and the oil starts to gum up and affect function. Both of those will work fine. I frequently hunt in much colder weather than 20-30, and I also hike in the winter with my 637 snubby. The other day it warmed up to 18 when I was getting back to the truck. I didn't fire more than a cylinder full, plinking, but no worries. Squeeze the trigger and it goes bang. Glocks, XDs, etc. have all gone with me on cold days. Wipe it down and get her ready for the next outing. I've never seen any of my firearms accumulate a significant amount of moisture unless it's snowing or raining on them directly. Of course, I'm in NM, so it's a tad drier out here.
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Old January 8, 2013, 04:10 PM   #31
eldorendo
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Maybe those advice-giving dolts were thinking of a Glock camera? In that case, yes, you might have a problem with condensation. However, with a Glock pistol, knife, shovel, etc., condensation is not an issue.
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Old January 8, 2013, 05:16 PM   #32
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Water's only going to condense on a gun when the metal is colder than the surrounding (wet) air. So, when they gun is warming up you might get some water. If the water stays there and the gun freezes again, you could get some ice, and ice - if it wound up in the wrong spot - could lock up either gun.
However, I've never had that happen. As has already been said, just bring your gun inside with you at night, wipe it down if it's wet, and store it somewhere dry.

The only other thing you're going to have to worry about with extreme cold is oil/lube gelling. I'd think that would be more likely to effect a revolver than a glock though as there are more moving parts to get stuck. I've really only ever heard about it happening with hunting rifles.

Personally I'd stick with the glock - as you know it works, and presumably like it - but I don't think one's going to be noticeably more reliable than the other.
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Old January 8, 2013, 05:24 PM   #33
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After about 6 shots into a 10-shot gunfight, that Glock will look a lot more reliable than that revolver!
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Old January 8, 2013, 09:13 PM   #34
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Yeah 20 degrees isn't THAT cold (but when the gun sits in 20 degrees for 4 months straight it's a little different)

But thank you for all the responses and personal advice I feel more confident in the GLOCK now.

BTW I use ZERO lube/oil in winter. I wipe it down to remove any oil and blow dry it to remove lube since the lube I currently have isn't "winter friendly"

Last edited by Josh17; January 8, 2013 at 09:25 PM.
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Old January 9, 2013, 09:53 AM   #35
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Quote:
BTW I use ZERO lube/oil in winter. I wipe it down to remove any oil and blow dry it to remove lube since the lube I currently have isn't "winter friendly"
This is not wise either.

Get some winter friendly lube then- you've made a significant purchase, now take care of it properly. At the very least, get some CLP and wipe the metal parts with a light application. Even though it may seem very dry out, you should still protect against corrosion.
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Old January 9, 2013, 12:37 PM   #36
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Zero lube is always a bad idea... Increased friction may impair the proper function of the gun and even of if it doesn't you are greatly increasing the wear...
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Old January 9, 2013, 05:38 PM   #37
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I think you are worrying too much. Once the gun warms up to room temperature the condensation will evaporate. I would clean and lube the gun weekly and cycle the ammo seasonally.

The only gun I have ever seen with a cold weather problem was my M-16 in the Army, in Germany, in the snow and cold 30 years ago. It was a one time occurrence that the bolt stuck back the first time I fired it, a smacked the stock and all was good.
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Old January 9, 2013, 09:13 PM   #38
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A semi has far fewer moving parts and most of them are protected inside the gun. Especially with striker fired guns. Revolvers have far more moving parts, many of which are exposed to the elements where ice, mud and debris can more easily mess thing up.

100 years of military field testing has clearly shown semi-auto pistols hold up to harsh conditions and abuse far better than revolvers. Kept clean and used in normal conditions a revolver will be slightly more reliable.
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Old January 10, 2013, 02:44 AM   #39
Josh17
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Why is no lube on a GLOCK bad? I've Seen the torture tested buried for 2 years 500 rounds fired, etc.

But that's beside the point. This is how I use it. Tell me if this is wrong or right:
Tell me if I'm wrong. WHEN I go shooting, I will lube it lightly. When I'm done I'll clean it ( if necessary such as I shot it a lot).

NOW when it's sitting in my car, in the cold, or when carrying it, I DO NOT use lube. How can no lube hurt a gun that is just sitting there or being carried? If I had to use it in SD, all there is is ten rounds. I doubt 10 rounds fired with no lubr would hurt it. Even if it did, in a SD life or death situation I don't think that kinda thing matters.

So if I plan on brining it to the range I LIGHTLY lube it. When carrying/sitting in my cold car for long periods i de-lube it and run it dry. Doesn't that make the most sense? Lube it if I PLAN on going to the range, but when it's just going to be sitting around for weeks/months in the cold to remove the lube and leave it dry? Since its just sitting there i don't possible understand how it could
Be hurt without lube from carrying it/having it sit there. IMO it's better to run it dry in the winter just in case the lube applied acts up from the cold .
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Old January 10, 2013, 08:31 AM   #40
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A light coating of CLP is going to protect against corrosion. It will not congeal or cause any binding problems- it will only be a positive.

You do not want dry, unprotected metal to be exposed to the elements for long periods (even just the air) if you can avoid it. Using your car every day will also cause changes in temperature. Since you easily can avoid it and use corrosion protection, why not just do it?
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Old January 11, 2013, 07:51 AM   #41
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I do have some of that "break free CLP" I didn't known it was winter "friendly". I assume it is then?
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Old January 11, 2013, 08:50 AM   #42
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Yes- it is good stuff. A light application should be fine and will be much better than nothing.
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Old January 12, 2013, 12:30 AM   #43
Josh17
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Thanks never knew the break free CLP was winter friendly. Will have to apply some that's the only lube I have at the moment. After owning a Glock cleaning and lubing has gotten me a little on the lazier side. Good to know though, thanks!
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Old January 12, 2013, 02:52 AM   #44
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Quote:
BTW I use ZERO lube/oil in winter.
I've seen one Glock pistol that was rendered temporarily non-functional because it had been thoroughly cleaned and had not been properly re-lubricated. It was missing lubrication in a critical area (slide cam where the connector "ear" rides on it).

I've also encountered a Ruger P95 that started malfunctioning almost every other shot after being fired without sufficient lubricant.

In both cases, lubing the guns properly got them up and running.

Too much lubricant is a problem. Too little is at least as bad.
Quote:
Thanks never knew the break free CLP was winter friendly.
It should be good down to around -60 or -65F.
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Old January 12, 2013, 06:46 AM   #45
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I have fired my Glock 26 at temps of around 15 degrees F. It shot fine, I will not comment on how accurate it was. I was shivering badly. I do not do cold well after having hypothermia twice the cold is not the same anymore.

If properly maintained either will work in cold or hot weather. Pick the one you shoot the best, or like to carry the most. Chances are it will be on your person more.
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Old January 12, 2013, 10:11 AM   #46
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GLOCK 26 all the way. Reason? I find the Glocks can be fired with gloved hands more readily than a revolver. Some gloves can get bound up in the trigger of a DA revolver and prevent it from reseting.

When I'm hitting the range on single-digit temperature days, it's the Glocks and a bunch of preloaded magazines because I know it's not going to give me any trouble.
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Old January 12, 2013, 10:33 AM   #47
bigkrackers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carne Frio View Post
Most LEO in Alaska carry Glocks. None carry the Ruger.
This probably has more to do with budget than quality. Not saying A Glock isn't reliable, just saying Glock gives their guns away to LE.

I would not concern myself with either malfunctioning because of the cold. I would be more concerned if I can get a gloved finger in the trigger guard or the operation of a safety with a gloved finger or numb digits.

As far as condensation goes, why would a Glock or Ruger be any different from a XD, Sig or HK? You still have to take care of the gun. They all have metal in them.

In short, you will probably be the cause of any issues with reliability due to the extreme cold and not the gun.
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Old January 13, 2013, 01:12 AM   #48
Josh17
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I somehow doubt I will "cause" the gun to become unreliable. I am obviously trying to find the best way to make it reliable, to research and hear what pepple have to say. Unless you meant "the Glock will be fine it wont have any problems unless you mess with it then that I can understand". The glock from what I gather is ultra reliable, some same the best semi auto when it comes to relability .I hear people saying put a small amount of lube or else it will jam and then I hear others say keep it bone dry. Two totally opposites. Can't say for certain who is right but I will try to find the middle-ground.

Last edited by Josh17; January 13, 2013 at 04:47 AM.
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Old January 13, 2013, 06:51 AM   #49
JohnKSa
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I somehow doubt I will "cause" the gun to become unreliable.
What he's saying is that it's more likely that the shooter will, due to grip issues or other problems caused by the extreme cold, be the cause of malfunctions than it is that the cold will affect the gun itself.
Quote:
...keep it bone dry.
I can tell you from experience that a Glock without any lubricant at all will not function properly. The slide cam/connector interface will tie up the gun if it is not lubricated. In addition, wear will become an issue without proper lubrication.
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Old January 14, 2013, 01:17 PM   #50
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Yes, I said you will probably be the cause of any issues with reliability...not the gun. In extreme cold you will loose dexterity in your fingers quickly, could be as fast as the walk from the front door of where you work out to the parking lot where your car is, if not wearing gloves. Your eyes might start to water if it's windy and if you wear contacts they can temporarily freeze (had this happen to me). If you're wearing gloves can you get to the trigger? Can you reload with gloves on?

In any case, if there is prolonged exposure to subzero temperatures funny things can happen to any of the materials that make up the modern day poly semi-auto or even something as classic as a 1911. Guns are designed to withstand extreme pressures and heat, not necessarily the cold. Plastics and metal can become more brittle. Lubricant can freeze and become almost like a glue or epoxy. If you take the gun inside from the cold you will have to deal with condensation (wipe the gun down and make sure it is dry before going back outside).

At any rate, for poly guns, the Glock is a great gun for cold weather; large trigger guard, no levers or safety that need to be engaged and there is documented history of Glocks being successfully used by LEO in cold weather.

As far a lubrication, try finding some dry film lubricants like sentry solutions. Slip2000, which is what I have used, is also rated for extreme cold. I also use Frog lube which makers say is rated to -40F. There are good products out there that will work so there is no need to run it dry like some have said, however, less is better in the cold.
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