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Old January 7, 2013, 04:59 AM   #1
Josh17
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Glock vs RUGER LCR what is better in COLD?

Okay I was wondering what is better RELIABILITY wise in cold weather: GLOCK (Glock 26 to be exact) or a .38 special RUGER LCR? I know the Ruger isn't full metal like most revolvers and is partly polymer from what I heard.

HOW I WOULD BE USING EITHER ONE:
I would be keeping the pistol in the cold winter most of the time. Like at work I work 12 hour shifts and can't carry at work so it'd sit locked up in my car during winter. It can get as low as -10 on the worst days at as high as 40 degrees (F) on the best days. Average temp is probably 20 to 30 degrees for the next 4 months or so. So it's pretty cold. I made a thread before about keeping a Glock in cold weather. I was told the only issue would be condenstation - such as when I bring a cold got into the warm house then back out into the cold again.

I'd like advice from any of you - I currently have a Glock 26 but wasn't sure if. RUGER LCR would be better suited for how I use it. Reliability due to condestation from cold to warm and back and forth is all I am concerned about. So a Glock or RUGER LCR what is better?

I say a RUGER LCR only because I have a trade offer for my Glock 26 and the offer is a RUGER LCR. I just wonder if it'd be more or less reliable for the conditions i said.
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Old January 7, 2013, 05:34 AM   #2
AndyWest
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I eyerolled when I read the topic, thinking it was a cold barrel accuracy question, but you mean COLD cold

Really, I can't imagine condensation would matter. I'm a pistol guy but you can't beat the reliability of a revolver. But if you go that direction, how about a bigger hand cannon in 38/357 since you're not carrying? In any case, you're prepared.
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Old January 7, 2013, 07:39 AM   #3
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I know that revolvers are suppose to be the most reliable (though I've heard some say a Glock rivals or even beats the old wheelgun since the wheelgun has more moving parts and is more delicate and is like a clock everything must be perfect) but how about in cold weather conditions and possible condestation? I heard Glock is the best "cold gun" but wasn't sure if its true.

Now here's the main reliability thing I always wondered.... What is more likely to FAIL TO FIRE (not jam) but plain not shoot? Just fail to fire? Lets say pulling the trigger again on the Revolver doesn't work. Wouldn't a Glock than win in reliability?
Also I assume the only thing that would cause a flat out fail to fire on a revolver or Glock would be something like a broken firing pin, etc. Isn't a revolver more likely to have a part break than a Glock? And if that's true wouldn't a Glock be more reliable than a revolver? I don't know the answer that's why I'm asking.

Is a revolver really more likely to go "bang" every time you pull the trigger than compared to a Glock? I thought the only thing that would cause a complete
Fail to fire in a Glock would be a broken part... And I thought Glock parts are less likely to break than a revolver?

Last edited by Josh17; January 7, 2013 at 07:46 AM.
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Old January 7, 2013, 07:48 AM   #4
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I'd go with the Glock--because they have a long reputation of proven performance in ALL conditions.

In the cold, make sure that the following parts are bone dry:

Striker assembly
Striker channel
Trigger, springs and cruciform assembly

(Note: These are supposed to be dry anyway. But double check to make sure.)
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Old January 7, 2013, 07:50 AM   #5
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I don't own either of these.... but I doubt there's one bit of difference in the performance of either one in the cold... Functionality in the extreme, extreme cold seems to be a function of the lubricant you use and not actually the mechanical design of a given weapon..

The German Army on the Russian front in WWII supposedly added a small amount of Gasoline to their lubricants they used on their weapons in order to keep the operational.

For myself my experience in the military was that the warmth or coldness of my hands ways more of a determining factor weapons use than anything else.. Hands too cold have a hard time pulling the trigger..
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Old January 7, 2013, 08:00 AM   #6
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Haters aside, yes, Glocks are extremely reliable bangwise. I love mine and would trust my life to it. Revolvers are just mechanically simpler hence the reputation. Either can fail. As Powderman says, Glocks run pretty dry. Don't slop oil all over it.

I suppose if I were you I'd stay with your Glock. Costs you nothing, no risk, etc. You can rest assured it'll go bang.
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Old January 7, 2013, 08:21 AM   #7
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get a makarov. They were made in russia i think they can handle your needs.
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Old January 7, 2013, 08:50 AM   #8
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I think you're being overly concerned about something you have been advised about already.

IF you are getting condensation and don't deal with it, only then will it become a reliability issue if you let it go long enough.

Get the LCR if you are going to be that worried about it- easier to just open and inspect, and wipe down/lube without taking it apart all the time.
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Old January 7, 2013, 09:33 AM   #9
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Keep a large freezer bag in the car and place the gun in the bag every time you take it into a warm building and let it reach room temp before you open the bag. No condensation on the gun. Of course this means the gun will not be immediately available. If there is ANY moisture in the gun it will freeze up solid. Try to come up with some way to NOT leave the gun in the car (not for freezing prevention), for theft prevention. I have had too many cars broken into by idiots just because they believed they "might" find something valuable. It's a very serious risk. And some lubes will turn into glue when the temp drops enough. Either gun will be the same as far as freezing, design does not matter.
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Old January 7, 2013, 01:11 PM   #10
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That's not cold.

I have kept guns locked in the lock box of my work truck for weeks without a problem in North Dakota. Temperature fluctuations of from -40 (for weeks) to 70 or so just from the heating and cooling. It is more of an issue with your ammo, just shoot the ammo up at the end of the season and keep your gun clean and lightly oiled. I prefer Mobil 1 as it flows well at any temp I have seen.
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Old January 7, 2013, 01:28 PM   #11
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You will fail before any of the pistols will.
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Old January 7, 2013, 01:52 PM   #12
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Most LEO in Alaska carry Glocks. None carry the Ruger.
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Old January 7, 2013, 02:00 PM   #13
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To really answer this question, you would have to do a scientific experiment in which the temperature was the only variable. Lower the temperature but keep all other conditions the same, until one of the guns starts to consistently fail.

I can almost guarantee you, in order for the above experiment to produce credible results, the temperature would have to be lowered past any naturally occurring condition on Earth. I believe both guns would continue to function well below -50 F. I could be wrong, but that is my guess.

So, if my theory is correct, it doesn't matter unless you are taking the gun to Neptune. And if you are, I'd upgrade to something with a little more power, like a phaser from the armory of the starship you will be on.

Call me a caliber snob, but it is well known that someone shot with a phaser will fly 20 feet backwards and die instantly.
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Old January 7, 2013, 02:03 PM   #14
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No issues with cold. Older firearms that used grease would/could have issues with it becoming too thick to cycle.
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Old January 7, 2013, 03:07 PM   #15
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Polymers tend to get brittle in very cold temperatures. I don't know about the particular type of Nylon used in Glocks. That would be my biggest concern.
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Old January 7, 2013, 07:32 PM   #16
Josh17
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Thanks. Sounds like the Glock is better suited. I don't know how to stop the condestation thing besides just once I bring it inside wipe it down dry and then even use the hair dryer on it. That is that I do when it's cold outside (last night probably around 5 degrees outside bringing into into warm house).

So basically what I'm getting at is a Glock (polymer) is less likely to experience condenstation issues than an all steel revolver? Or is that not true.
I'm trying the ziplock bag thing also. Drail - about how long should I leave the Glock in the ziplock bag before it reaches room temp?

Colorado is cold. Whoever said it wasnt cold is wrong. Places like Gunnison, Colorado is the #1 coldest city in ALL the lower states. In fact colorado holds the #1 and #3 spot for most snowfall in history, beating Alaska. So yes, it's darn cold out here. I am from South dakota. There was more crazy weather out there, but in the rural parts of Colorado it's more cold temp wise on AVERAGE. But I don't wanna argue about coldest state - but colorado is DAMN cold!!

Edit- I just read your post over again, NANUK. I see your point. Thanks for the advice I will be sure to change carry ammo more often now.

Though in the winter I don't put any kind of lube on the Glock. I leave it dry. Just during winter, though.

Last edited by Josh17; January 7, 2013 at 07:50 PM.
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Old January 7, 2013, 07:57 PM   #17
Josh17
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Thanks for all the responses. I'm not asking though if the Glock will be good in just plain COLD weather - I'm pretty sure it will.

My question had to due with condestation from going from cold to warm and back and forth - I was wondering if the Glock is affected easily by that. Not cold, but the condestation part that comes with living in the cold.
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Old January 7, 2013, 08:27 PM   #18
Carne Frio
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There are two methods that I use to bring a cold
gun into a warm environment. If the gun is in a
case that is also cold, I bring it into my unheated
and enclosed porch. It is usually just above
freezing there. After it's been the a half day or
so, I bring it into the house and don't remove it
from the case for a few hours more.

The other method, is to bring it inside and get it
next to a heater, hot enough so that the moisture
evaporates. The the gun gets a good wipe down
with gun oil or CLP.
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Old January 7, 2013, 09:28 PM   #19
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Glocks really aren't affected by much... bombs perhaps?

I'd be the first to admit that and I don't even like them much.


just bring your gun inside and leave it by a heating vent. Dry is dry. Warm air blowing on it will cure any condensation issues.

Seriously. I feel your over thinking the whole cold thing. Don't worry so much. Guns are far from delicate and glocks are notorious for being durable and reliable.
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Old January 7, 2013, 10:17 PM   #20
Josh17
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I normally field strip it and use a hair dryer to dry off the frame, slide, barrel, recoil spring, everything. I use the hair dryer for about 60 seconds on each of the parts I mentioned. That way works just as good I'm assuming? It just sucks having to field strip it and blow dry it every time I take it inside.

If condestation has already built up on the gun from say another time I brought it inside, will blow drying it remove all condenstation then even from previous times I brought it inside? If that's the case i won't worry much and just dry it off every few days.

Last edited by Josh17; January 7, 2013 at 10:26 PM.
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Old January 7, 2013, 10:23 PM   #21
Josh17
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That's the thing - I do heat it up every time I bring it inside with a hair dryer. But do I have to do this EVERY time I bring it in from cold to warm?

Main question:
If condestation has already built up on the gun from say another time I brought it inside, will blow drying it remove all condenstation then even from previous times I brought it inside? If that's the case i won't worry much and just dry it off every few days.
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Old January 7, 2013, 11:49 PM   #22
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car storage

how about something like this silicone impregnated handgun sack:



http://www.cabelas.com/product/Bore-...ase/706663.uts
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Old January 8, 2013, 12:29 AM   #23
Josh17
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Will that prevent/stop condenstation from forming?
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Old January 8, 2013, 12:45 AM   #24
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Josh 17,

Correct me if I'm wrong, but you created a previous posts recently in regards to concerns with storing a pistol in cold weather?

I assumed some light was shed on the subject, but appears you are still concerned. As stated before, a Glock will do well being stored in the cold. I understand your continuing concern with condensation build-up with fluctuating temperatures, but it seems you are going to actually try it out before you can gain any confidence. Yes condensation can build up over time, but Glocks are notorious for being rugged and numerous (and slightly ridiculous) tests have been conducted proving Glock's durability. I would go for it as you are just going to get the same answers you have already received. As for the Ruger, I am sure it will do just fine in the cold as well.
Again, you are going to have to try something out and see how it works out for you.
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Old January 8, 2013, 01:03 AM   #25
Josh17
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I did. But I guess some people telling me condenstation will occur 100% chance made me kinda worry.

But majority of people are saying it won't be an issue so I am going to trust that. I wish there was a place I could legally shot around here... But everywhere is closed down! I have to drive up dangerous snowy mountain cliffs that takes a couple hours of driving to simply test fire it... It sucks!

They closed down all the shooting ranges around here. All this anti-gun stuff is getting out of control! And Colorado is suppose to be one of the most gun friendly states in the country (better than Texas) but even we are seeing the 2nd amendment being taken away.
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