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Old January 29, 2013, 08:54 PM   #1
CTS
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Opinions on a Ruger Mk 1 Target Model

I purchased this gun today and was doing a little research on it. By the serial number it is a 1969 model Mk 1 target model with bull barrel and target sights. I see in other threads where people quite often recommend the MkII and MkIII but don't see much about the MK1. Just curious as to why that is and if you think I got a decent deal at $250?
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Old January 29, 2013, 09:00 PM   #2
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IMO, $250 is a very good deal for a MkI, especially if it's clean and low mileage. Looks like a sweet shooter. Congrats.
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Old January 29, 2013, 09:23 PM   #3
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I prefer the MK1's, in fact I have 4 MK1/Standards. They all shoot great, I replaced the extractors as preventative maintenance and it was simple. I replaced the barrel with tactical solutions threaded barrels so I can use suppressors, plus the tactical solutions barrels are very lightweight and accurate. The stock Ruger barrels are accurate, but not lightweight. The trigger on the MK1's is said to be a bit better than the newer models. Now all you need to do is get out and shoot your Ruger Mark 1 and have fun!
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Old January 29, 2013, 09:46 PM   #4
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I shot it a little this afternoon. I tossed and empty milk jug out in the yard and shot a mag full at it and put all nine in about a 3 inch area offhand. I love the way these things shoot. The trigger has a little creep but it breaks at what feels to me to be about 2 maybe 2 1/2 lbs. I don't know if creep is the right word, take up maybe, almost like a two stage trigger.

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Old January 29, 2013, 10:45 PM   #5
lee n. field
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I see in other threads where people quite often recommend the MkII and MkIII but don't see much about the MK1
The differences from Mk 1 to Mk2 make the Mk2 more attractive to me. Last shot bolt hold open, 10 rd magazine (vs. 9, not such a bit deal), and it's explicitly OK to dry fire.

Not that I'd refuse a good eal on a Mark I. No, not at all.
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Old January 29, 2013, 11:39 PM   #6
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I don't know what the difference is as far as dry firing but I know it takes about 5 minutes to convert the 9 shot mag to 10 shot and I don't really care so much about bolt locking open on an empty mag unless it is a self defense weapon. For target shooting and small game hunting it really isn't important to me. Not that big a rush to reload.
I measured the trigger pull and it breaks right at 3lbs.
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Old January 30, 2013, 12:55 AM   #7
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I don't know what the difference is as far as dry firing
The MkIII (I assume the MkII as well) has a pin that limits the firing pin travel so it can't go forward enough to hit the rim of the chamber.
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Old January 30, 2013, 04:44 AM   #8
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I prefer the MK II over the other version as it holds ten rounds, has the firing pin stop, and easier access to the bolt ears through a tapered rear receiver. To me the MK II is the best version of the Ruger .22. That being said there is nothing wrong with a MK I. The MK III has some "features" that have made some problematic like the loaded chamber indicator and magazine disconnect, but these can be overcome with some modifications.
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Old January 30, 2013, 10:49 AM   #9
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Ok now I am confused. When reading the instructions for take down and reassembly they specifically mention making sure that the firing pin stop pin is in place or the firing pin when dry fired will move too far forward and damage the chamber. It sounds like the same thing you guys are talking about. Am I wrong? I don't know if it matters but this is the older A54 frame with the mag button on the right.
Also, for anyone interested, Numrich has the walnut grip panels for the A54 frame with the Ruger logo for $22.95 each. I thought I would never find grips for it and then decided to look there. Still being skeptical I called to make sure and they are in stock.
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Old January 30, 2013, 11:30 AM   #10
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If I'm not mistaken, the "firing pin stop" has been a part of the Ruger .22 auto since the days when they were being produced in a small shed. It was a part of Bill's original design, as far as I know.
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Old January 30, 2013, 01:21 PM   #11
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If I'm not mistaken, the "firing pin stop" has been a part of the Ruger .22 auto since the days when they were being produced in a small shed. It was a part of Bill's original design, as far as I know.
That was my thinking as well. I know that on the Mark 1s at least they can fall out easily and could get missed and the bolt reinstalled which would cause a problem but I never heard of one that was built without it. Of course I am no expert either.
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Old January 30, 2013, 07:46 PM   #12
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The Mark I is safe to dry fire same as the MK II or III. The firing pin stop has been part of the design since day one. According to Rugers FAQ's, all Ruger rimfires are safe to dry fire.

I've got two Mk I's, and a Mk II now. I've owned a couple of Mk III's. I can't really tell that one is better than the other. The II's have a couple of features that I like, but they're not that big a deal. The III's have a few features that I don't care about, but they're not deal breakers either. I just look for the best price.

I believe only the target sighted models are properly called "Mk I"'s. The fixed sight tapered barrel guns were simply called "Standard Automatic". Since there hadn't been any changes planned in the beginning, there was no need for a "Mark" number. The adjustable sights were the first change. Most people however refer to anything pre Mark II as a Mark I.
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Old January 30, 2013, 08:04 PM   #13
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My Dad shot a Mark I for years in NRA smallbore pistol matches. It was the first gun I ever shot. Has an old Bushnell Phantom 1.5x scope on it. I've killed quite a few squirrels with it too! Great guns!


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Old January 30, 2013, 08:32 PM   #14
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I believe only the target sighted models are properly called "Mk I"'s. The fixed sight tapered barrel guns were simply called "Standard Automatic". Since there hadn't been any changes planned in the beginning, there was no need for a "Mark" number. The adjustable sights were the first change. Most people however refer to anything pre Mark II as a Mark I.
That would appear to be correct according to Fjestad's Blue book. They list First the Red Eagle Standard and Target Model. Then the Black Eagle Standard Model, then Black or Silver Eagle Mark I target, Mark II Standard, Mark II Aniversary, Mark II Target etc.
It says that the original Red Eagle was changed to a Black Eagle in 1952, in memory of the death of Alexander Sturm who died in Nov 1951.
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Old January 30, 2013, 08:41 PM   #15
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I have the exact same pistol. Well, I don't. My father in law gave one to my 5 year old son. Very accurate. My mag is hard to remove and hard to load. Is yours?
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Old January 30, 2013, 10:44 PM   #16
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I thought it was hard to load , at least repeatedly. Then I got that little red rubber loader and an extra clip. I now find it quite managable. You gotta get that little loader. It takes all the pain out of it.
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Old January 30, 2013, 10:51 PM   #17
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I've had a Mk I for 35 years. It's still capable of better accuracy than I am. I used to frequent an indoor range where I'd dump a 50 round box of ammo out on the table, clip the flap of the empty cardboard box to the target carrier, run it out to 25 yards and proceed to put 80% of the rounds through the box using a two hand hold and producing a flip every time I hit it. Wasn't unusual to look up from concentrating on the task at hand to see shooters on either side gawking at the riddled box when I ran it back.

The Mk I just made it look easy.
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Old January 30, 2013, 10:53 PM   #18
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I have one that is hard to remove and one that is not. The one I have a problem with is an aftermarket mag. It has a black plastic floor plate that say's Eaton. It is apparently a Mark II mag since it holds 10 rounds. If your mag is catching after it comes about 1/2" out, look for a sharp edge on the mag release. This tends to hang in the magazine where it transitions from floor plate to sheet metal. I took a file to my magazine release and filed the sharp edge off and no longer have a problem.
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Old January 31, 2013, 09:00 AM   #19
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I shot competitively for many years with a Ruger Standard. Am still kicking myself for selling it.
Only caveat is, on some, the magazines are not interchangable with later models. Do watch that.
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Old January 31, 2013, 10:11 AM   #20
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They are actually more interchangeable than may realize. With a few little tricks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKMA5qFDcS0
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Old February 1, 2013, 05:44 AM   #21
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They are actually more interchangeable than may realize. With a few little tricks.
I discovered the other night that not all "Mark I's" use the same magazine. Apparently at some point they switched the button from right to left. I've got one from 1960 with the button on the right, and one from 1974 with it on the left. If you look at the grip screws, and the bottom screw on the right grip is lower than on the left, you have an "A100" frame, and the magazine button should go on the left.

If the bottom screw on the right is higher than the one on the left, you have an "A54" frame and the botton should go on the right.

In theory, you can simply swap the button and use either magazine in either gun, but I have seen magazines that simply will not work in one gun, but will work fine in another.

The more I fool with these Standard Auto's the more they interest me, and they're inexpensive enough to not break the bank.

From 1960.



From 1974



You can see the difference in the location of the grip screws in the pictures.
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Old February 1, 2013, 09:10 AM   #22
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I have also found a source for different grips for both. On ebay there is a seller named "gun garage" who has Pachmayer grips for the A100 frame (around $26) and Numlrich Gun parts has Checkered Walnut grips with the original Ruger logo for the A54 frame for $22 and change.
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