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Old January 2, 2013, 12:29 AM   #1
FLChinook
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Are vintage Ruger 10/22's better?

Ruger has been making the great little 10/22 for many years. You can buy a SS/Synthetic at Walmart for under $250. Or you can pay more for a vintage one.

Most feel that Winchester dropped in quality after '64, although they may have come part way back. But is there a change-date like that for Ruger and the 10/22? Are the vintage Rugers better?
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Old January 2, 2013, 06:44 AM   #2
JoeDorn
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I DO NOT CLAIM TO BE AN AUTHORITY so this is definitely FWIW...

I became interested in the 10/22 after attending an Appleseed two years ago. It is the ideal gun for that training. I started looking and reading and pricing. I ended up with SS and laminated stock already tricked out and dead on accurate.

I have continued to follow 10/22's on several gun forums and I have never seen an adverse comment about old vs. new guns. There are so many options available that if there is something you don't like, just change it.

I have just recently purchased two NIB 10/22's in an AR configuration (have a hissy fit, Diane) for my grand kids to get them started in Appleseed.

Want to know more about Appleseeds go to:

http://appleseedinfo.org/

I like the 10/22's but I love my Browning BL22 (lever action, short throw), the tube feed just does not work for the configurations you have to set up for the RWVA (Appleseed sponsor) events.
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Old January 2, 2013, 07:13 AM   #3
zbird
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The only difference I know of is, the trigger housing on the older rifles use a steel trigger housing, where as the new one's are plastic.
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Old January 2, 2013, 07:58 AM   #4
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I'll put it this way. If I find an older model w/walnut stock in VG-excellent condition, I'll give as much(or a little more) for that one as I would for a new production NIB.
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Old January 2, 2013, 09:19 AM   #5
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Short answer...... Yes. Even before Ruger switched to the polymer trigger housings their fit and finish has steadily degraded over the years. They're still reliable guns and IMO accuracy hasn't suffered but I'l take 10/22's from the '70's, the '80's and then the '90's in that order before any of the current offerings. I don't see them going for more money than current models around here but IMO they are worth more money.
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Old January 2, 2013, 09:32 AM   #6
jmr40
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Quote:
The only difference I know of is, the trigger housing on the older rifles use a steel trigger housing, where as the new one's are plastic.
The older trigger housing was cast aluminum with a black painted finish that would flake off with age. The new plastic part is tougher, stronger and has no paint to flake off.

If you go back to the very early guns you will find a bit better quality of finish on both metal and wood. The newer guns are far more accurate in my experience. This change is very recent. The 2 guns I bought for my kids less than 10 years ago are not even close to the newer 10-22's I've bought and shot. Starting about the time they changed over to the plastic trigger group Ruger's started to improve their accuracy. My newest 10-22's shoot right with my CZ.
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Old January 2, 2013, 12:05 PM   #7
RickB
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Collectors have identified so many detail variations, that it's hard to know where to draw the line between one that is vintage, and one that is just old.
I got a 10/22 for Christmas, and couldn't remember which Christmas it was, so went to some collector sites, looking for serial number info.
"Early" guns had walnut stocks (really early guns had stocks made by a subcontractor, but stock production was later moved in-house), aluminum buttplates, Lyman flip sights, and other details which changed over the years.
I certainly prefer walnut to birch, and metal to plastic.
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Old January 2, 2013, 12:06 PM   #8
Dragline45
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Quote:
The older trigger housing was cast aluminum with a black painted finish that would flake off with age. The new plastic part is tougher, stronger and has no paint to flake off.
I have heard the same and actually prefer the polymer trigger housing. One thing I do not prefer is the plastic barrel band, it would constantly come loose after 100 rounds or so. I picked up a couple of the older aluminum barrel bands and stripped the paint off and gave it a brushed finish to match the barrel on my stainless 10/22.
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Old January 2, 2013, 12:29 PM   #9
FLChinook
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If you peek in my gun safe, you'll find more older guns than newer ones. I just like guns that were fitted more by hand and machined steel parts more than stamped parts.

I take pleasure in the feel of my Winchester 63 but I don't often take it out for general plinking. Hence, the interest in the 10/22. It looks like the changes in the 10/22 may not be as significant as in other guns.

I think I'll go for a take-down model and the option for an older gun won't be a factor...
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Old January 2, 2013, 04:41 PM   #10
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They sure are but still that good !!

Quote:
Are vintage Ruger 10/22's better?
I have followed this little guys for many years and that would be another big Yes, for me. The only ones that catch my eye, are the older ones. I could go through a list of things but will let others do that. ...

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Last edited by Pahoo; January 2, 2013 at 07:24 PM.
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Old January 2, 2013, 04:48 PM   #11
Slamfire
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I liked the walnut that came on early Ruger 10/22's but that is about it.

The 10/22 is not a precision made rifle, it was made to be cheap. The barrels were cheap, the receivers were cheap, and the trigger housings were cheap, but the things went bang.

Their later target models have excellent barrels.
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Old January 2, 2013, 07:27 PM   #12
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If you don't mind spray painted finishes and plastic parts the newer ones will do.....
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Old January 2, 2013, 07:29 PM   #13
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The model I got was a 1967. It had a very nice stock, but that was taken off in favor of a bullpup. No idea if it is any better than a new one, it's just one I had.

The stocks were better is all I know for sure.
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Old January 2, 2013, 07:50 PM   #14
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I have two older guns with the metal trigger guards and a newer SS/synthetic with a plastic trigger housing and they all seem to work just fine. My new Gun has an extraction problem and would not throw out the empty case. I bought a new extractor from Midway for about $10 and that solved the problem. I think the stronger spring was the real secret to fixing the problem.

I have read the metal triggers were not as precise and the people who assembled them had boxes of parts to try till they got it working correctly. The new plastic guards work without sorting through a selection of parts. Plus they are supposed to be more damage resistant.

Of my three the stainless is my favorite. I wish it would occur to ruger to make the buttplate removable so you could store survival supplies. I have been looking at the new take down model and think they missed a real chance for making a near perfect survival rifle.
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Old January 2, 2013, 09:54 PM   #15
Mike38
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I own two Ruger 10/22 carbines. One is around 17 years old, the other 2 years old. Both stainless, and both with the Volquartzen trigger kits. The older one has a nice polished finish. The newer one looks like it was bead blasted then painted grey. Painted receiver too. The older one has a nice smooth feel when you open the bolt, and it‘s been that way since day one. The newer one feels like it has sand in the receiver, and isn‘t getting better with use. But, both shoot great at about 3 MOA, and feed and eject flawlessly when using quality ammo.
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Old January 3, 2013, 11:05 AM   #16
Pahoo
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Your "Measure"

In my previous reply, I said that "they" are still that good and then that not as good as the older ones and I still feel that way. ..

I would add that there are contract shops that will perform trigger upgrades or modifications. Some of these shops will not perform this service, on the newer 10/22's. Can't say why or where they make this cut. ....

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Old January 3, 2013, 11:56 AM   #17
FLChinook
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Quote:
I would add that there are contract shops that will perform trigger upgrades or modifications. Some of these shops will not perform this service, on the newer 10/22's.
Can you refer me to one or two of these shops? I'll contact them and try to flesh this out...
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Old January 3, 2013, 12:06 PM   #18
Pahoo
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Delete, dupicate

Delete, dupicate
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Old January 3, 2013, 12:08 PM   #19
Pahoo
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Time to Flesh !!!

Quote:
Can you refer me to one or two of these shops? I'll contact them and try to flesh this out...
It's been about five years since I went in, specifically looking for this service and on their WebPage, they listed that they would not do the trigger on the new plastic trigger housings as they could not guaratee the work. At that time, I was looking for this work and found this surprizing. Prompted me to learn how to do them mysellf....

Be Safe !!!
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Old January 3, 2013, 12:17 PM   #20
FLChinook
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When did 10/22 plastic trigger guards start?

Does anyone know what year Ruger started using plastic trigger guards?
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