The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Semi-automatic Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 29, 2012, 02:25 PM   #1
Kanos
Junior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Operation of CZ 75 Compact Clone (Canik c-100)

Hello All,

I have recently acquired my first handgun, a Canik55 C-100 pistol. Love the way it feels and the fit and finish is great, everything I hoped it would be.

But, I have a few questions about the guns operation:

1. When unloaded, is there anyway to release the slide without using the Slide release? I picked this weapon up at my local FFL dealer and I swear he showed me a way of pulling the slide further back and it releasing, but I have been unable to replicate this and the operators manual is not clear.

2. With a blow-back style pistol, is it hard on the gun to use the slide release to release the slide when the chamber is empty? If so, would I be better off pressing the slide release, but then riding the slide back into its locked position?

Thanks for the help,

Kanos
Kanos is offline  
Old December 29, 2012, 05:26 PM   #2
tekarra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 26, 2007
Posts: 1,106
Kanos,

With a round in the magazine you can release the slide by depressing the slide stop or by grasping the slide and pulling it back. This is called slingshoting. With an empty magazine, you must retract the slide slightly and then depress the slide stop.

I think the C100 is a great pistol as well.
tekarra is offline  
Old December 29, 2012, 05:59 PM   #3
Ralph Allen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 21, 2007
Posts: 385
Answer to question 1; magazine must be removed to release slide by pulling back and letting go. With the empty magazine in the pistol the last round hold open feature keeps this from happening.
Ralph
Ralph Allen is offline  
Old December 29, 2012, 06:54 PM   #4
Kanos
Junior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Thanks for the info.

Any additional advice in terms of releasing the slide and letting it slam forward instead of guiding it with your hand?

I've heard (through a quick Google search) that this may be hard on an empty pistol.

Cant wait to shoot this thing! Excite for my first pistol (not first gun), and I have the Davidson's lifetime guarantee as insurance.

Where is a good place for budget ammo? I would like to sling some poor quality round through her and see if I can make her FTF/FTE.

Thanks,
Kanos
Kanos is offline  
Old December 29, 2012, 07:06 PM   #5
FALPhil
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 10, 2007
Location: Racoon City
Posts: 933
Quote:
2. With a blow-back style pistol, is it hard on the gun to use the slide release to release the slide when the chamber is empty? If so, would I be better off pressing the slide release, but then riding the slide back into its locked position?
Do you own a blow-back pistol? The Canik is a locked breech pistol on a modified Browning design.

It won't hurt your pistol to release the slide under recoil spring power. I wouldn't do it a hundred times a day for a year, but every now and then will be OK.
FALPhil is offline  
Old December 29, 2012, 07:12 PM   #6
Kanos
Junior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Thanks for the info.

Do you have a source to learn about different types of pistols? I would like to learn more.

Thanks for all the help.
Kanos is offline  
Old December 29, 2012, 10:23 PM   #7
dyl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 31, 2009
Location: Virginia
Posts: 509
Congrats on your gun.

You'll hear lots of opinions on questions about: is it safe to dry fire, is it safe to release the slide without a round in the magazine?

Releasing the slide without chambering a round in the process: proponents say this is just about what happens with every shot fired during normal operation. The slide slams shut and it doesn't matter if you use the lever or slingshot. Proponents suggest that you default to your habits in a panic/emergency so you therefore would not want to get used to riding the slide back gently to chamber a round.

Against: some say that in normal use a round is stripped off the magazine and chambered with every shot as the slide closes and this slows the slide. So they do not like to let the slide slam shut.

Personally I am for slamming shut in principle, on the range, and when I introduce others to shooting. It's logical to me. Yet I baby one of my sentimental pistols and ease that one shut if it's empty. If you hold a loaded magazine in your hand and push one round out so it falls onto the table, was that enough friction to slow the slide down? Maybe, maybe not. Some of these gun-handling controversies have to do with specific models, soft steel, or concerns about safety more so than damage to the gun.

Etiquette: with similar issues, people like it if you take the gentler looking approach when handling other people's guns or at a store or gun show. Ease the slide shut and do not dry fire unless you have permission.

Slide lock on empty: here's why the slide locks open for all handguns that do this: look at the magazine. The plastic follower which is underneath all the rounds when loaded has a flat ledge built into it. Most mags even have a cutout in the metal lips of the magazine so this plastic ledge can be prominent when all rounds are expended. When there are no more rounds in the mag this ledge comes to the surface and pushes against the slide stop lever which holds the slide back when you're empty. Like stopping a door from opening by putting your shoe down in it's way. The only way to let the slide close again is by lowering the magazine follower - either pressing the slide release (pushes on the plastic follower) or putting a mag with rounds in (follower is not at the top) or by lowering the whole magazine bodily and then trying the above.

That lever is commonly built into the takedown pin if yours has one.

Great website written by a forum mod/trainer: cornered cat .com
dyl is offline  
Old December 30, 2012, 02:41 AM   #8
Kanos
Junior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Thanks for the info. Very easy to understand. I was surprised at how little my Canik manual said about the pistols operation, but I suppose they believe it to be common knowledge.

CANT WAIT to fire this weapon. I got some snap caps and have been dry firing it single and double action to smooth the trigger out and learn proper trigger control.

Something I just noticed is a tiny piece of finish missing right by the ejector port of the weapon. No moving part could touch it, so it must have been my own doing. Oh well, it's my first pistol and I'm building character.

Do you believe I should strip the weapon and clean out all the excess oil it was shipped in? I've heard either way, and I'm hesitant to do being inexperienced. I would want to improperly oil/assemble my weapon and have it malfunction on the range.

Thanks,
Kanos
Kanos is offline  
Old December 30, 2012, 04:19 PM   #9
tekarra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 26, 2007
Posts: 1,106
The oil on your new pistol is a preservative for shipping and storage and not a lubricant. All you need to do is field strip the pistol, remove the grips and clean it with solvent. I swish mine around in a pan of solvent, then wipe it and let it sit to dry. After cleaning, lube it according to the manual and you are good to go. Follow the directions for field stripping in the manual. it is easy and you need to learn so you can keep it clean and operating.
tekarra is offline  
Old January 8, 2013, 06:56 PM   #10
dyl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 31, 2009
Location: Virginia
Posts: 509
eventually need to field strip

It's been a week or so but I thought you should know you will eventually need to field strip your pistol for cleaning. It probably doesn't need to be cleaned every range trip unless you're shooting a LOT at a time. I clean mine every time more for enjoyment.

Some basics about gun handling during dis-assembly :
if the parts do not want to go back together relatively easily, do not force them. Instead try wiggling at different angles (especially removing/re-inserting barrel into slide) to see if you find the right angle.

Be careful about what solvent you use, some plastics/rubber don't like solvents. I can usually do all my cleaning with just oil, an old toothbrush, a bore brush/bore snake, and paper towels. Less is typically better (no hard scrubbing on polished exterior surfaces if possible, i had a little rock embedded in a brass brush that was supposed to be softer than steel)

If you have a bore brush/cleaning rod, it helps to push all the way through before reversing directions. Try as much as possible to clean from the breech end (not the tip/muzzle of the barrel) as damaging the crown of barrel can affect accuracy.

Cleaning/field stripping build familiarity with your gun and you'll be able to notice what parts are wearing / settling in / if anything ever breaks.
dyl is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08520 seconds with 7 queries