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Old December 28, 2012, 01:27 PM   #1
XParaman
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Pre 64 Winchester model 70

I recently picked up a new 1949 Winchester model 70 270. Its unfired and a beauty. I have never seen a stock like this one on a Pre 64. I got it from a friend who got it from the original owner. It was a Presentation gun he got at GM. It has a couple of really minor flaws but like new.
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Old December 28, 2012, 02:32 PM   #2
math teacher
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Beautiful! If it is truly all original and unfired, except for factory proofing, then you might want to keep it that way. It should have a lot of collector value.
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Old December 28, 2012, 08:14 PM   #3
30-30remchester
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I have collected and studied this model for 45 years and have never seen such a stock either. Could you please post some more photos?
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Old December 28, 2012, 08:19 PM   #4
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Ditto. I'd like better pictures too. Doesn't look like a factory stock.
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Old December 28, 2012, 08:23 PM   #5
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Congrats, anything Winchester pre 64 is something to be treasured
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Old December 28, 2012, 09:32 PM   #6
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From what little I see, which is like looking at a nickle from 10,000 feet, the wood could be fiddle back maple.

I am unaware of any factory fiddle back maple stocks on M70's.

But there were aftermarket:







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Old December 29, 2012, 06:03 AM   #7
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My gandfather owned a pre 64 model 70 winchester in .30-06, he bought it brand new from the hardware store in the little town I grew up in (not sure what year he bought it) that was one of, if not the best shooting rifle I've ever seen in my life and I've owned a bunch of good ones including custom built rifles, that old model 70 shot any weight of bullet you put through it with incredible accuracy! I shot a 1 ragged hole 5 shot group at 100 yards with the old rifle the last time I shot it. It was grandfathered to me but I let my uncle keep the rifle knowing it would never ever leave the family. I swear I can spot a pre 64 model 70 winchester a mile away! . I had a chance to own a brand new pre 64 win mod 70 in .264 win mag many years ago when I was 16 or 17 and let it get away, (stupid kid I was!) That old gun had the 2 original old yellow boxes of winchester super X ammo with it that was bought with the rifle new, I guess it wasn't brand new there were 2 fired cases in one of the boxes, the story was the guy that bought it wanted to try deer hunting but after firing the gun twice it kicked harder than he could stand so he put it away for all those years and basicly forgot about it, when he passed away his family sold it to a friend of mine for 100.00 dollars, It was offered to me for 250.00 and I let it get away. That one stil haunts me!
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Old December 29, 2012, 08:15 AM   #8
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I have a pre-'64 Model 70 in 300 H&H Magnum with a Weaver Alaskan scope that my dad's best friend, our family doctor bought in about 1951 for a hunting trip to the Yukon. He returned with a moose, an elk, a caribou and a Dall ram on their way from a taxidermist in Dawson. The gun went into his gun rack never to be used again- the only hunting he ever did after that trip was for white tail in the Adirondacks with a Model 94 he bought at the same time, the Model 70 was too much gun for that and besides, it kicked him too hard. When the trophies got delivered, he discovered that all but the sheep were too big to fit in his house, so they got hung in the garage. The sheep dominated the living room until his wife retired it to the garage with its partners. The rifle remained unfired for about 40 years until the doctor gave me his small collection because his new wife (the original had died) didn't like guns. It had been well kept (I had oiled it periodically, along with the others that I cleaned and maintained for him over the years) and it now sits in my rack, along with the original box of ammunition that came back from the Yukon. I've shot it with new factory ammunition and have reloaded the new cases, working up a load that's pretty accurate. I've thought of a new more modern scope, but it seemed best to leave it in the configuration it has always been in, in memory of the man and his friendship of 80 years with my father.
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Old December 29, 2012, 09:18 AM   #9
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That's a neat story uncle billy, I would leave the old weaver on it if it was me. I've been there done that with my grandfathers old 06, it had a weaver fixed 4 power scope on it along with weaver base and rings (think that was pretty much the norm for them old guns) I ended up putting a leupold 3x9 and leupold base and rings on the old rifle, this is when I shot the 5 shot one ragged hole group, when I let my uncle have the rifle I put the weaver stuff back on it, I shouldn't have messed with it in the first place, I'm one of those guys that have to tinker and better is always something I search for, I didn't hurt anything by switching scopes, rings, and bases back n forth but i would leave it alone if I had it to do over again
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Old December 29, 2012, 11:00 AM   #10
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The "fiddleback" feature can show up in almost any hardwood including walnut and even birch. I used to have a Ruger 10-22 with the cheap birch stock that looked almost just like.

It is hard to say from the small photo, but this could just be a piece of factory walnut that has some areas of fiddleback in it. Or, it could be a custom stock. Hard to say.
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Old December 29, 2012, 12:08 PM   #11
XParaman
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Not a restock

The stock on the gun is original, its not a replacement. The only thing I can tell you is its walnut, and it came with the gun. I assume it came from the custom shop, but since no factory information is avialable its impossible to verify. But I took it apart and it has all the markings and such, and the stock is old not something new or replaced. Its a truly amazing looking gun, and I plan on keeping it unfired, I only wish I had the box and paper work. The old guy tossed them when he got the gun, put it in a case and that is where it stayed.
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Old December 29, 2012, 10:32 PM   #12
JT-AR-MG42
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Looking forward to some more - and hopefully larger - photos XParaman.

The straight comb is certainly in keeping with a 1949.

While it's a pretty small photo, that looks like a 22G rear sight in the barrel lug? And do I discern the hole in the stock for-end for the barrel screw?
Both would be expected on a 1949 factory rifle. Their presence re-enforces your claim.

Most custom stock makers did away with that screw and the resultant hole in the wood for it.

I guess any doubts some of us might have stem from the fact that the rifle is not a Super Grade. Also possibly the lack of the signature reddish stock finish Winchester used.

Myself, I've only seen one with lumber that approached yours. It was a 1957 S.G. featherweight .243.

Fine looking rifle that many of us would enjoy seeing again, JT

Last edited by JT-AR-MG42; December 30, 2012 at 09:23 AM.
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Old December 30, 2012, 01:02 PM   #13
XParaman
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Pictures

I will work on getting some pictures that I can post, but with restrictions on the size of the pics its hard, being an old guy and not as familar with all the new tech. I downloaded a program and hope I can get some decent pics posted
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Old December 30, 2012, 01:28 PM   #14
XParaman
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Pics

hope these load
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Old December 30, 2012, 09:40 PM   #15
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It looks a little like iron wood, but not exactly. I use it for knife making, but at the price it commands in small pieces, that stock would be worth a fortune.
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