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Old December 20, 2012, 09:13 PM   #1
Chowder
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AR Buffer.

I am putting together my first AR-15 and was going to order a buffer and spring tonight. I found this buffer for $11 dollars.

http://www.bravocompanyusa.com/Carbi...%20carbine.htm

And these other buffers of different weight for $37

http://www.bravocompanyusa.com/H3-Ca...rbine%20h3.htm

Does anyone know what the differences the weight would make? and is it worth the extra money? I don't really have a set budget for this build but don't want to get more expensive parts for no reason. Thanks for your help.
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Old December 20, 2012, 09:46 PM   #2
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Heavier buffers slow down cycling. The general wisdom is to run the heaviest buffer that will let the gun reliably cycle, but then again, few people have several and swap them out to see how it runs.

You can start with the cheap one, and if it seems like the thing is running rough (things bouncing off the back of the buffer tube, etc.), then go heavier.
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Old December 20, 2012, 09:47 PM   #3
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There are 3 weights in the buffer. In the standard carbine buffer all three are steel. H has one tungsten weight, H2 has two, and H3 has all three tungsten weights. A heavier buffer will delay extraction and reduce load on all the parts, too heavy and it may not strip the next round from the mag.

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Old December 20, 2012, 10:08 PM   #4
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I use a Spike's ST-T2, and have been happy with it.
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Old December 21, 2012, 12:54 AM   #5
Chowder
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Thank you for the reply and chart, I suppose I will go with the cheap one unless it is not running correctly.
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Old December 22, 2012, 10:29 AM   #6
Marquezj16
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All my AR15s have the standard buffer. If there are no problems when you shoot it, no need to go looking for one.
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Old December 22, 2012, 01:06 PM   #7
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Spikes ST-T2
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Old December 22, 2012, 01:46 PM   #8
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The only ARs that generally need heavier buffers are SBRs and 16'' carbine length rifles (most run fine though).
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Old December 22, 2012, 03:37 PM   #9
oldsoonershooter
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short vs long

I was converting a conventional Colt stock AR to a collapsable six position magpul and noticed that the buffer in my Colt was much longer than the ones I have seen pictured. Is that because the original stock had more room for the spring and buffer to collapse? Do they even use the older longer buffers any more?
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Old December 22, 2012, 04:13 PM   #10
RT
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If you are building a 16 inch AR with a carbine gas length, then you can probably use H or H2 buffers. Carbine buffer will be fine too, though.
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Old December 22, 2012, 04:59 PM   #11
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Quote:
I was converting a conventional Colt stock AR to a collapsable six position magpul and noticed that the buffer in my Colt was much longer than the ones I have seen pictured. Is that because the original stock had more room for the spring and buffer to collapse? Do they even use the older longer buffers any more?
The buffers and springs are different between the rifle (fixed) and carbine (collapsible) stocks. If you're switching between a regular fixed stock and a collapsible, you need to swap not just the stock and buffer tube, but also the spring and buffer.
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Old December 22, 2012, 06:01 PM   #12
Chowder
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Thanks for all the replies everyone I just ordered the cheap one and will see how that runs.
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