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Old December 16, 2012, 05:57 PM   #1
mlcompound
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Lever action 38/357

This is probably a worn out question but I am asking anyway. I have a hankering for above said rifle (once I sell or trade my m&p9c). About how much should I expect to spend on a fairly used one? Also, I don't know much about the different ones out there, any thoughts?

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Old December 16, 2012, 06:51 PM   #2
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Was the search feature used?
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Old December 16, 2012, 06:58 PM   #3
idek
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Last year, I bought a Marlin 1894c that was made around 2000. The previous owner (who bought it new) said he'd only put about 20 rounds through it. It looked like new, and I believe his estimated round count.

I ended up paying close to $600, which is about what the new 1894c's go for, but the wood and bluing looked better on the used gun.

I can't comment on other 38/357 lever guns, but the general consensus is that older Marlins are more desirable than the new ones, so you may not find them to be very cheap.
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Old December 16, 2012, 10:55 PM   #4
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You can either go to a Gun Show or Cowboy Shoot and look over the rifles to see what's available. At a Shoot there's a real good chance you'll get to actually shoot some of the guns.
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Old December 16, 2012, 11:17 PM   #5
David R. Svatos
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38/357

If you can find one get a BL 92 Browning they are worth every penny I got a 38/357 and a 44 love 'em both JMB invented them as well as scores of others. He is the most copied firearm inventer in history why settle for a copy?

Last edited by David R. Svatos; December 16, 2012 at 11:19 PM. Reason: misspelled word
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Old December 17, 2012, 08:49 AM   #6
mlcompound
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Thanks for the info. It seems these are in high demand right now. Not many for sale. I have used the search but it just isn't much fun. I prefer a good conversation.

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Old December 17, 2012, 08:57 AM   #7
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Expect to pay North of $500 for one, TODAY (not once upon a time), if/when one can be found.



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Old December 17, 2012, 11:10 AM   #8
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I have a blued Rossi on order from Walmart. Should be in any day now.

Once it is in hand I will do a report on it.

I paid $447.00 plus tax
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Old December 17, 2012, 11:11 AM   #9
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i have a marlin 1894C and im very happy with it. If your planning to put a scope on your rifle, you should buy one that ejects on the side of the receiver and not on top (like rossis, etc).
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Old December 17, 2012, 11:14 AM   #10
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The Marlins do seem to be more desireable; expecially the Pre-Safety models.

Be Safe !!!
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Old December 17, 2012, 03:23 PM   #11
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I have been researching and it looks like the Rossi is the only one in my price range. I am aware of the issues but it seems like they can all be remedied with some elbow grease. Would it be a bad idea to start out with one?

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Old December 17, 2012, 03:55 PM   #12
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I have the Marlin 1894 in .38-.357 that I bought new in 1981. Micro-groove rifling, no cross bolt safty. As I recall I paid $140. for it. I have taken several deer with it including a nice 8 point and a big 10 point. It is still in like new condition and one of my favorate Marlins.

I know they are much more expensive now, but I have no qualms about recomending one.
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Old December 18, 2012, 08:10 PM   #13
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The Rossi is a good choice. I just got a .44 to go with the .357 I bought a few months ago. In both cases I was able to examine the gun before the purchase. They are hit and miss from what I've read. Here is a forum with a lot of good info on these rifles: http://www.rossi-rifleman.com/index....32d0c2ed142141

On neither of my guns does the wood fit to the metal as well as it could. However it's close enough and you can't tell unless you look for it. In my case I want a light and crisp trigger (2 lbs). This was easy to do with the .357. I stoned the insides and used a spring kit. Btw the spring kit from Brownell's comes with an ejector spring that will not fit. Another issue I have is that there are machine marks on the loading gate of the .357 and they are not subtle. No other issues I can think of off hand.

The action on my .357 is slick as can be. The .44 rifle action I haven't been able to get to yet but the new action is a bit rough. The trigger has a little creep but isn't bad for a stock gun. Triggers on both guns were decent out of the box.

With a little work the trigger can be nearly perfect on these guns. With my older eyes I can get consistent 1.25" groups at 50 yards with the .357 and there's no doubt in my mind the gun is capable of 1" or less at that range. The bluing on both guns is as good as the bluing on a Ruger.

Overall you get a pretty decent gun for 450 bucks or so. If you do the action job and refinish the stocks it can be very nice to shoot and to look at.
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Old December 18, 2012, 09:04 PM   #14
4V50 Gary
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I like the Browning 92, but good luck in finding one.

I settled for a Marlin 94 and managed to get a pre-safety model.
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Old December 18, 2012, 09:31 PM   #15
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The Brazilian 1892 reproductions are the most economical. The '92 action is strong and compact (thank you JM Browning). Expect it to be stiff and rough out of the box. Some of them are very ammo sensitive especially if you shoot the shorter .38 Special rounds. If it won't feed try different bullet shapes and cartridges with a longer overall length.

Here is the guy to know on improving the '92: http://stevesgunz.com/ He sells a DVD if you want to slick it up yourself and he also does action work on these rifles. If I was in the market for a '92 I would probably just buy it from Steve Young with the action work done.

For many years the Marlin was an excellent choice. A little more expensive than the '92 but they can be slicked up quite nicely. Then Remington bought the company and moved the lever action production line. Many complaints about poor quality control. Remington suspended production of the 1894 rifles for a while. Hopefully they will get better but in the meanwhile the market price of a good used Marlin has gone way up. A friend of mine paid $800 recently for a like-new Marlin and was lucky to find it.

The top rifle in cowboy action is a Uberti reproduction 1873 or 1866 Winchester. They are expensive and that's before you spend more money on them to slick them up to realize their potential. I really like my '73 but if you are not shooting cowboy action and trying to get to the point where you can shoot 10 rounds out of the rifle, 10 from the revolvers and load and fire four shotgun shells in less than, oh, 17 seconds or so, you might not want to put that much money into a lever rifle.

In case you were curious, though, here is one example of a gunsmith selling "competition ready" 1873: http://www.codyscowboyshop.com/#pricing
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Old December 18, 2012, 10:48 PM   #16
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Nice reviews. I will have to be in the Rossi camp due to my budget. Cowboy action sounds like a lot of fun.

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Old December 19, 2012, 12:52 AM   #17
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You will not be disappointed in a .357 lever. A set of aperature or tang sights will make it a tad more shootable if you can still do irons. The Marlins are easily scoped.

Factory ammo available in a wide range of applications, from .38 WC to .357 180 gr hunting ammo.
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Old December 19, 2012, 12:55 AM   #18
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But I just haven't figured out what I would do with one.
I am out of CAS and I have a powerful .30-30 to hunt with and an economical .22 to plink with.
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Old December 19, 2012, 07:52 AM   #19
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Is there any issues reloading for the rifle? I currently cast and load for 38 special handguns.

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Old December 19, 2012, 12:02 PM   #20
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Yes, there may be issues, with ANY .38/.357 levergun - especially with handloaded sharp-shouldered Keith-style boolits and/or wadcutters, and particularly in .38 Special.

RN boolits and JSP/JHP will generally feed OK, provided the loaded OAL is correct for the particular rifle.


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Old December 19, 2012, 12:35 PM   #21
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Most of your reloading for targets, hunting SD or whatever can be handled by using a R(ound)N(ose)F(lat)P(oint) lead bullet. I prefer the158 gr.
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Old December 19, 2012, 06:02 PM   #22
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I have a 358 125g rnfp already but I can always get a new mold.

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Old December 19, 2012, 09:21 PM   #23
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I shoot 158 gr. .38's in mine, haven't yet had a feeding issue. So, it is possible! The only cycling issue I've had is that sometime ejection of spent .38's is a little weak.
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Old December 20, 2012, 10:47 PM   #24
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I have seen some JM stamped marlins go for north of $900.00

They are great little guns though. I would Avoid the Rossi and the new Remington marlins but the others should be fine.
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