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Old December 2, 2012, 09:18 PM   #1
02bigdogs17
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Marlin 336 in .35 rem

I was just wanting to know what thoughts you guys have on the new Marlin lever guns since Remington took over and about the .35 rem cartridge. Is this a caliber that a 9 year old boy can handle for deer hunting? Thanks for coments.
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Old December 2, 2012, 09:56 PM   #2
PetahW
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The new Remlins are about the poorest choice a buyer today can make IMHO.

Someone wanting a Marlin 336 woud be a world better off by buying an good condition older (preferably pre-safety) model.

And, NO, the .35 Rem isn't a chambering many 9 year olds can handle, unless they happen to be 5' 10" & 175lbs.

IMO, any 9 y.o. started with one will soon quit shooting for good.

A much better choice would be a peep-sighted .357 Rem Mag levergun or perhaps something like a .250 Savage bolt or lever (a pump might be to heavy).

.
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Old December 2, 2012, 10:04 PM   #3
alex0535
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I think a 9 year old could handle it and it is known for being a good deer round. My first deer was taken with a Marlin 336 in .35 remington, my grandfather, and father have also taken deer with this rifle. Its going to be a good bit of gun for a 9 year old.

I thought the recoil was very tolerable with Remington 200 grain Cor-locked rounds. More of a shove than a kick. It didn't deafen me when I shot the deer without hearing protection.

.30-30 is another great option.

I can't speak for how smooth the actions of the newer ones are. But on our old one you really have to cycle it with a bit of enthusiasm or else it doesn't feed easily. Our newer 336 .30-30 cycles much better after having taken it completely apart, cleaned it thoroughly and polished some parts a little bit.

These guns are built to last, I would not be afraid to by a used one if the action cycles well. These guns tend to work a little better after they have had some rounds put through them.

Last edited by alex0535; December 2, 2012 at 10:10 PM.
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Old December 2, 2012, 10:19 PM   #4
02bigdogs17
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Thanks for the info. .357 mag was my first choice anyways. Just wanted to know more about the .35 rem heard a lot of people say they were very good for whitetale deer. Did not know how bad the recoil would be on this caliber.
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Old December 2, 2012, 10:23 PM   #5
jmr40
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Marlin no longer shows the 35 as an option on their website. If I wanted one I'd get it now. If they have discontinued them prices on used ones will bring a premium soon.

I've used the 35 and 30-30 a lot over the years. I cannot tell any real difference in recoil although I'm sure the 35 has slightly more, at least on paper. Cannot tell any real difference in performance either although some guys swear the 35 is a better deer killer.

Can a 9 Year old handle it, probably. But it depends a lot on the individual person. While neither 30-30 or 35 have a lot of recoil I've always felt the stock designs on the lever guns tend to make recoil feel worse than it should. I'd start a kid that young on a 243. But if a 35 is what you have and you don't want to spend money on another gun I'd give it a try.
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Old December 2, 2012, 10:54 PM   #6
02bigdogs17
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I live and hunt in Indiana. Can not use .243 here. I wish... I do not own a .35 rem just looking for a nice gun for my boy to deer hunt with. Everything I hunt with kicks to hard for him and I don't want to scare him. I am thinking of buying him a Marlin 1894 .357mag. but what I really would like to find is a Browning BL-.357mag.
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Old December 3, 2012, 06:10 AM   #7
03Shadowbob
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One of my friend's son took a deer this year with my .35Remington. He's 11 and about 145lbs. Recoil is not bad at all and the 35Remington is a very potent killer. 30-30 would also be fine I'm sure and a whole lot less expensive if you reload. Around here a box of 35R goes for close to $40.
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Old December 3, 2012, 08:00 AM   #8
Jack O'Conner
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In my opinon, the 35 is too much recoil for the boy. Try the reduced recoil ammo in 30-30 instead.

Jack

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Old December 3, 2012, 10:23 AM   #9
boattale
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Depends on the boy. My 10 year old grandson handles the recoil from his .30-06 just fine.
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Old December 3, 2012, 10:52 AM   #10
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The only way to know for sure is to have him shoot one, but I also would opt for the .30-30 in an older JM marked 336. I haven't handled any of the newer Marlins (Remington owned) but I've heard enough horror stories that I wouldn't buy one without being able to shoot it first which isn't going to happen with a new one. The older rifles look a little nicer to me anyway and you don't have to worry too much about it getting knocked around since I'm sure it'll have a couple dings in it when you get it. If you opt for the .35 Rem you'll probably want to start reloading for it so you can tone down the recoil for the boy. By the way, locally here .30-30 ammo is about $10 per box cheaper than .35 Rem ammo and is a whole lot more available too so that may be something you'll want to consider. Don't get me wrong I love the .35 Rem and think it's a great cartridge but the only way I can afford to shoot mine is to reload it

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Old December 3, 2012, 11:10 AM   #11
Water-Man
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At the age of ten I was hunting with Grandpa's Remington Model 8 .35 cal.

The recoil wasn't bad. The weight of that rifle was another story but I wasn't going to let Grandpa know that.

The .35 Remington is a stone-cold deer and black bear killer.

I'd stay away from the newer Marlin lever guns.
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Old December 3, 2012, 03:47 PM   #12
Salmoneye
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I have no idea about the boy in question, but I started hunting deer/bear with a 1958 336RC in .35 Rem at the age of 9 with factory loads...

Now that I am older, I now know how to load-down the .35 Rem to .357 mag velocities with .38 cal handgun bullets...

http://www.gmdr.com/lever/lowveldata.htm
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Old December 4, 2012, 11:53 AM   #13
kahrguy
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The 35 rem is 1.920 case lenght . Your limited to 1.80 ain't you. Get him a h&r or t/c in a 45lc or 44 mag or 357 mag that can be rechamber to a 357 maximum. http://www.bellmtcs.com/store/index.php?cid=121

The 44 and 45 with a hotter ruger loads in a rifle can reach close to 1900 and 1800 fps for each . That will get you out there to 150 yards atleast.
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Old December 4, 2012, 04:10 PM   #14
Jevyod
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The first gun I ever hunted with was a Marlin 336 in 35 Rem. I loved that gun! The thing i liked about that gun over say a bolt gun was the way it handled. It made a bolt gun seem cumbersome. The shortness and balance was something i grew to love! Having said that, I was 12 before I started hunting. I am not sure what i would compare the recoil to. It has slightly more than my 260 Rem but not much. Just my 2 cents!
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Old December 4, 2012, 05:37 PM   #15
02bigdogs17
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Thanks kahrguy you are right. The .35 rem in a pistol is legal here but not the rifle. Well I guess it is a good thing I did not buy one yet.
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Old December 4, 2012, 07:04 PM   #16
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Some states specify max shell case length? Learn something every day. What state is that?
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Old December 4, 2012, 09:27 PM   #17
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How about a .338 BR Rem . , its a 1.5" case derived from the .308 Win.
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Old December 4, 2012, 10:47 PM   #18
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Since Marlin stopped chambering the 336 in .35 Rem, how much will that increase the value of my Marlin chambered for it?

It was bought in early 80s and is in pristine shape.

Paid $84.50 for it at a K-Mart.

Rmocarsky
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Old December 4, 2012, 10:55 PM   #19
stu925
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Quote:
Since Marlin stopped chambering the 336 in .35 Rem, how much will that increase the value of my Marlin chambered for it?

It was bought in early 80s and is in pristine shape.

Paid $84.50 for it at a K-Mart.

Rmocarsky
Around here that's a $350-450 rifle. I think you may see them bring back the .35 once they get the bugs worked out of their production line but only time will tell.

Stu
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Old December 7, 2012, 10:04 AM   #20
bamaranger
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again

Lots of us started w/ a lever carbine, many pre-safety models to boot, but.......I am not fan of lever carbines for new shooters. The whole issue of letting the hammer down on a live round and the half-cock safety on older, pre lawyered rifles is not fully understood by some folks. Smaller, weaker, less knowing hands can lead to AD's. My early Marlin .357 was a challenge to both my boy and the wife. So much so that we used it solely as a range tool and a step up from .22, single load one and shoot it, eject ... repeat.

Today, for the same or less money, one can find prefectly suitable bolt rifle, w/ youth sizied stock, in mild calibers.

The .35 Rem launches a 200 gr SP at well over 2000 fps. From a light carbine recoil can be pretty snappy.

I've become a fan of 7.62x39mm bolt rifles for starters if ranges will be modest, and the .243 if ranges will go past 150.
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Old December 8, 2012, 03:13 PM   #21
1stmar
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I have a 336 in 35 rem, my son is 12. He has only fired it from a bench but didn't care for it. I think it depends on how much shooting he will and from what position. On the hunt, he won't feel anything when it goes off, too much adrenaline.
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