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Old November 28, 2012, 01:45 PM   #1
Kimio
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Recommendations for adhesive that can withstand high temps?

That can also mate steel to wood? This "glue" would be subject to heat radiating off of the barrel. Any suggestions?
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Old November 28, 2012, 02:38 PM   #2
hhunter318
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Do you want something that has any give to it? Or are you wanting something more solid with a high tensile strength?
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Old November 28, 2012, 03:09 PM   #3
Kimio
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It's for a set of handguards that I'm trying to fashion for an FN FAL

I'm essentially trying make the handguards shown on this rifle



out of some french walnut.

The problem is that the bipod cuts are impossible to cut unless you increase the thickness, which handguards such as these are already terribly thin.

So the plan was to cut these, just above the bipod "slots", duracoating the metal and then "gluing" them to the upper portions fashioned from the french walnut.

so the glue would need to be strong so that in the event that the rifle were to fall (heaven forbid) it wouldn't simply snap away from the wood.
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Old November 28, 2012, 04:10 PM   #4
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There are several epoxy resins that can take the heat of a barrel, and will bond with tons of strength while remaining somewhat resistant to solvents.

However - do you ever want to remove the wood again? a high strength epoxy will essentially be a permanent mount.
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Old November 28, 2012, 04:24 PM   #5
Kimio
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The handguards them selves are two pieces, and will not be glued to the rifle itself.

The problem I keep encountering and what many keep saying that makes this job "impossible" is that the wood is too thin and won't hold up to a beating (such as falling from a table). The bi-pod cuts creates a hole through the wood that would require shaping to fill and a hard snap of the steel bipods could instantly fracture the wood.

I want to try and find a way to do this, there has to be a way to make the wooden hand guards a viable choice. I am trying to go a different route here by modifying the lower portions of the hand guards so that they may be mated to the halves of the wooden handguards (which are removable).

To answer your question anothernewb, I want this bond to be permanent and strong. I'm trying to find something that can also be used to reinforce the wooden portions of the handguards themselves without adding too much thickness.

It's a pain in the ass and everywhere I go I seem to get naysayers sadly. Some stating that the constant heat treatment of the wood from the barrel heating up will spell the demise of the hand guards eventually.

Last edited by Kimio; November 28, 2012 at 05:47 PM.
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Old November 28, 2012, 08:34 PM   #6
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Not the wood but the glue
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Old November 28, 2012, 08:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
To answer your question anothernewb, I want this bond to be permanent and strong. I'm trying to find something that can also be used to reinforce the wooden portions of the handguards themselves without adding too much thickness.
I may be missing something here, but why not back it with a few layers of fiberglass, or even carbon fiber mat?
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Old November 29, 2012, 02:40 PM   #8
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If you want a permanent bond, then epoxy is what your'e looking for. The stuff is unbelievable - provided you prep the surfaces right. Even the cheap JB weld putty stuff is good to something like 700*F and has a tensile strength many times that of the wood. Depending on the mix, the stuff can be like putty or water to boot.

The most important thing is prep though. Gotta give the stuff something to grab. so the surface has gotta be rough, and free of oils and such. Once the epoxy has hardened, you can get stuff that's resistant to virtually anything save for foundry acid.

I can't quote a specific product by name for you, but a quick google search should help you lots.

places like McMaster Carr and Grainger carry lots of industrial epoxy adhesives.
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Old November 29, 2012, 02:50 PM   #9
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http://www.masterbond.com/tds/supreme-10ht

http://www.masterbond.com/tds/ep45ht

quick one I found that might work good
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Old November 29, 2012, 03:57 PM   #10
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I have made machining molds out of Devcon.
They even held up with several aluminum pours.
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Old November 30, 2012, 09:44 AM   #11
Rifleman1776
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I make handles for most of my tools and many firearms items. Walnut, IMHO, is a very poor choice for a job like this. My preference is Osage Orange or stabilized Maple. Both are unbelievably strong. I use epoxy to hold them on. Epoxy will tolerate the heat unless it is very high and very constant for a long time.
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Old December 1, 2012, 05:40 PM   #12
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I have used elmers white glue to repair kevlar poi wicks.....

Its wicks on chains soaked in coleman fuel/white gas and spun around as performance art.

Its weakness is water, but it holds up pretty well to being soaked in white gas and lit on fire for 5 minutes or so.

I would suggest for you to find some heat tolerant epoxy. It should be a little more durable for using it on a gun. Remember to get release agent to keep it off anything you don't want stuck together forever.
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