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Old November 28, 2012, 10:07 AM   #26
totaldla
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Revolvers fail rather easily in the torture tests they put Glocks through. Revolvers are less reliable than semi-autos. Revolvers are fun, but not for the serious.
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Old November 28, 2012, 11:16 AM   #27
jmortimer
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"Revolvers are fun, but not for the serious"
???????????????????????????????????????????????
Wow - what can you say?
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Old November 28, 2012, 11:29 AM   #28
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Quote:
"Revolvers are fun, but not for the serious"
???????????????????????????????????????????????
Wow - what can you say?
Not with a straight face.
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Old November 28, 2012, 12:57 PM   #29
L_Killkenny
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Quote:
All those torture tests are completely meaningless unless of course you plan on doing the same with your gun.
Yep. Good show for the TV or internet but I can think of no time where any civilian would not be able to service a gun that happened to take that "1 in a million" bath in sand, mud and water before he needs it again. Pointless.

Quote:
Revolvers fail rather easily in the torture tests they put Glocks through. Revolvers are less reliable than semi-autos. Revolvers are fun, but not for the serious.
Not only pointless but ignorant as well.
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Old November 28, 2012, 02:39 PM   #30
fastbolt
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"Torture tests"? Really?

Ah, the internet ... and the ability of anyone to post video clips and their opinions, nowadays.

As a firearms instructor & armorer I've seen some of the "big name" semiauto pistols choke when used on a sand-covered range, after something as simple as having a magazine was dropped onto the sand and then used to try and continue a course-of-fire. Some pistols could be restored to normal functioning after some gymnastics & frantic manipulations of the user ... and every once in a while the pistol became non-functional, requiring bench time by an armorer or a gunsmith. Things happen in real life.

I remember several years ago when I attended an armorer class for one of the big name gun companies. (I've been to more than 20 armorer class, BTW, including first times & recerts.)

I met an armorer who had served in one of our armed forces a year over in the sandbox. While we were trading experiences about different weapons, me from LE and him from a military perspective. He told me about having had the opportunity to "practice" with some service-type pistols from 3 of the gun companies while over there. Only one of them finished the first day without repeated stoppages or malfunctions caused by the fine sand. Machines generally don't like sand.

I try not to abuse my handguns, meaning both revolvers and semiauto pistols. I don't mind seeing them used hard, meaning to the point where parts may require replacement. I do my best to prevent them being needlessly exposed to harsh/hostile environments, though, and I practice preventive maintenance and pay heed to manufacturer recommendations about routine replacement of springs, etc. If a weapon is dropped into sand, submerged in water, exposed to contaminants, etc, I inspect and clean the weapon as an armorer.

Just a few years ago I was called to inspect a metal-framed (stainless steel) .40 S&W duty pistol belonging to an agency other than my own. I was told it was exhibiting some functioning problems. Apparently, that agency didn't have someone certified as an armorer for that make/model weapon.

I was further told it had been dropped and fully submerged in salt water about a year previously. From what I was able to learn, the weapon had never been inspected or cleaned after being submerged in salt water a year ago, and apparently because the submersion incident hadn't been reported by the issued user.

As you might expect, I found some rusted & corroded parts, as well as some nasty fouling. Replacement of the affected parts & assemblies, and a thorough cleaning/lubrication, and the weapon was once again running as intended.

FWIW, as an armorer for some different makes/models of pistols, and S&W revolvers, I'd much sooner detail strip and clean ... or replace parts ... in most any pistol before doing so with a revolver. That might just be my lazy streak, though.
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Old November 28, 2012, 04:14 PM   #31
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Just let a cop carry it for 20 years.
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