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Old November 16, 2012, 11:25 PM   #1
GunXpatriot
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Ammo Oxidation and how to prevent it?

So I had about 10 boxes of .30-06 ammo hanging around for whenever I felt like having fun. I havent touched any of them in, maybe 4-5 months. That was the last time I've gotten to go shooting. You're probably wondering "how does this guy survive?"

haha, but anyway, I noticed that the brass casing actually started to oxidize a little bit. It has a few slight "blotches" of dark marks. The bullets themselves seem fine. I was curious. This hasn't happened before, so I decided to look at my .22 ammo. My half-used box of Federal bulk .22 had also started to oxidize. The oxidation on the casing was negligible, but the copper jacket on the bullet had started to become dark!

Then, to my surprise, I checked some leftover Winchester 333 ammo. The bullets and casings were perfect, even though they were with the Federal and .30-06 ammo... As for the oxidation, I could imagine keeping the ammo in a humid place could expose them to excess moisture, and my old house was definitely humid. But why would the Remington .30-06 and Federal .22 ammo oxidize and the Winchester not? The winchester has been laying around for about 2 years now, much longer than the others!

Now, I've started to keep my ammo in ammo cans and I was wondering how I could prevent oxidation. I know ammo cans are pretty much immune to outside water, but what about any moisture that could be trapped inside? I'm sure if I left it for 10 years and checked it, they will have been affected? Would a couple little packets of dessicant do the trick? Thanks
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Old November 17, 2012, 03:04 AM   #2
Metal god
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some 22 ammo has a wax coating on them . That would keep them looking good longer .

I use these packets in my ammo cans to absorb mosture http://www.amazon.com/Dry-Packs-Cott...isture+packets
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Old November 17, 2012, 05:23 AM   #3
mete
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You're assuming that it's 'oxidation '. Copper and it's alloys usually form a sulfide though it can also oxidize. It can also react to ammonia compounds . Cracked case necks -is caused by stress corrosion cracking .Thunderstorms create ammonia compounds from nitrogen in the air .
It's too early to give metallurgy lessons .
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Old November 17, 2012, 07:37 AM   #4
Rifleman1776
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A squirt of WD-40. Problem solved.
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Old November 17, 2012, 03:41 PM   #5
drail
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Really great idea.
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Old November 17, 2012, 04:03 PM   #6
barnbwt
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Quote:
Copper and it's alloys usually form a sulfide though it can also oxidize
Something I realized recently (just moved into a newly constructed building) is the potential threat the dreaded "Chinese" drywall poses to us gunnies. Though wrongly attributed solely to Chinese drywall imports (lots of US stuff was bad that year, too), any recently constructed building could be "tainted" with wall board that gives off too much Hydrogen Sulfide gas. Not bad in small doses, but in these large quantities it will corrode, ruining wiring, airconditioners, and you guessed it--brass ammo/bullets. Probably not great to breathe, either

TCB
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Old November 17, 2012, 07:19 PM   #7
berettaprofessor
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Quote:
A squirt of WD-40. Problem solved.
Yeah, that'll fix a corrosion problem. But won't it also make it into duds?
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Old November 17, 2012, 07:43 PM   #8
Sparks1957
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WD-40 should be kept far away from guns and ammo, there are far more suitable products for lubrication and corrosion prevention.
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Old November 17, 2012, 08:53 PM   #9
mete
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Years back one of the gun magazines did a test to see which oil would contaminate ammo .That should be out there somewhere.
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Old November 18, 2012, 02:06 PM   #10
berettaprofessor
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Don't know about gun magazines, but I stand corrected;WD40 doesn't harm ammo, at least in the short term. A quick search turned up the link below and several others with similar conclusions:

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot39.htm
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Old November 23, 2012, 02:57 PM   #11
ShotPlacement
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WD40 and oils like CLP are penetrating and cleaning oils specially designed to flow into tiny crevices and cracks - like between the bullet and the casing - or it could dissolve the coating between the primer and the casing rendering the primer useless.

Keep your ammo dry!
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