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Old November 19, 2012, 09:33 AM   #1
Stressfire
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Press storage

'Morning, All

Well, to make a long story short-ish my fiancee needs back surgery (again, sigh). The last time this happened, carrying the full load of rent/bills/expenses solo literally broke the bank as she doesn't get much paid sick leave from her job.

As such, and because our current apartment is on a second story which would make recovery difficult for her, we will be moving in with a relative for a few months.

I am able to bring my firearms with me, provided that they stay locked up when not headed to the range, which is fine. It has been requested that I do not load while there, however.

I'm planning on loading up enough rounds to see me through the winter and will likely use up all powder and prrimers, however, I'm not sure as to the proper storage of the presses for the few months that they will be out of commission.

Sorry about the novel, but finally to the question: How do I store the presses? I have a Dillion 450 and a Lyman Spar-T.
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Old November 19, 2012, 09:50 AM   #2
thump_rrr
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Use Boeshield T-9 Coat all unpainted metal liberally with it.
it leaves a nice coating which will prevent rust.
You can also use it on dies etc.
It can be found in the tool section at Sears.
People use it to protect table saws etc.
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Old November 19, 2012, 10:24 AM   #3
JimDandy
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A Dri-Z-air or other silica moisture absorber in the storage closet/room/etc probably wouldn't hurt, though the help would be somewhat debatable depenign on environment and storage area size as well. I'd try and do as close to the same as you'd do with a tool or firearm as possible.
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Old November 19, 2012, 11:10 AM   #4
Kevin Rohrer
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Lube the bare metal parts and store in a dry place with low humidity.
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Old November 19, 2012, 11:23 AM   #5
praetorian97
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Over lube. You can always clean off excess later. Also Saran Wrap will help too.

Then Id put a cover over that. As long as you lube a lot you will not have to worry about the Wrap trapping moisture.
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Old November 19, 2012, 02:05 PM   #6
Stressfire
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OK, so a good amount of some type of oil on bare metal parts, wrapped in a moisture-proof barrier layer. Gotcha.

Will only be a few months I think, but better safe than rusty.

How about storage/shock-protective media? Cardboard box? Rubbermaid tote? Packing peanuts? Old newspaper?
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Old November 20, 2012, 04:26 PM   #7
BigJimP
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humidity is your enemy --- although in the late Fall and winter its less of an issue......but don't put things like newspaper next to the press ....it traps and holds moisture out of the air.

I wouldn't wrap anything in saran wrap either....air with moisture in it will go thur the wrap ....and then when it cools, you'll get moisture trapped on the inside of the stretch wrap.

Air circulation is good....

BoeShield is a really good product - or even a light oil is good...(like Rig #2 or even something as light as Rem Oil ). I buy BoeShield at my local woodworking store ( use it to protect my cast iron tool table tops ).

Light oil ....an old garage sale pillow case over it ...( cotton pillow case ) that breathes is good..../ if pillow cases aren't big enough ...go to a fabric store....look for relatively thin cotton fabric ( something ugly will be on sale )....and tell someone in there who knows how fabric is measured ( widths are different for some reason on some stuff )....but just tell them you need something cheap and 24" X 48" or whatever you need...

I asked my wife to make me a cotton cover....that covers both of my presses on the bench.....she sewed it up in about 20 min for me...

Check it in storage once every other week or so ...and check for moisture or any issues.
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Old November 21, 2012, 12:04 AM   #8
praetorian97
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We got orders to England and stored our firearms in that manner. 3 1/2 years later the firearms were immaculate.
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Old November 21, 2012, 12:58 AM   #9
dacaur
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I wouldn't use any kind of liquid oil, as it will run off (its liquid.....) depending on where its stored that might not be a problem, someplace with hvac I wouldn't worry, but in an unheated/cooled area, I would use some kind of light grease or similar, basicaly something with some consistancy, not a liquid. I have some lanolin based lube I use on my dies and press and tools in my basement (lano-lube) its nice because it doesnt attract dirt or get nasty like grease. you can easily rub it off, but enough always stays behind to protect. I apply it to my tools once a year....
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Old November 21, 2012, 11:38 PM   #10
RC20
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Quote:
I wouldn't wrap anything in saran wrap either....air with moisture in it will go thur the wrap ....and then when it cools, you'll get moisture trapped on the inside of the stretch wrap.
Roger on that. WD40 would be good as well.

If you keep in a closed environment like a gun safe, then the desiccant silcon dryer would be very important.

That said, I have done nothing for my presses forever and they came out of 15 yeas of storage just fine. Helps its Alaska with low humidity but we get wet summers.

Gun oil would be fine as well. A film will stick.
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Old November 21, 2012, 11:55 PM   #11
jackpine
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lube and then bag it to keep most of the dust off. If theres rust in a few months it should come off with a little steel wool.
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Old November 22, 2012, 12:19 PM   #12
RC20
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My brother kept his in a crawl space. Two floods in the area as I recall (some reload stuff has water marks the primers.

Press was above that. He gave it to me, just fine stored in the original box.

I would not bag anything.

Light oil, the spray on stuff (CRP) or WD40 and in a cardboard box to keep dust off and as dry as you can get it.

Don't put in contact with concrete, if you have to wood blocks under.

Don't have to be elaborate
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Old November 22, 2012, 02:26 PM   #13
wncchester
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WD-40 is a lousy rust preventative for anything longer than a few weeks of storage, it dries and leaves a brownish varnish that isn't a good vapor barrier. Automotive Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) is a light oil that is very slow to evaporate and leaves no residue, gives good film strenth for excellant rust protection and is quite inexpensive by the quart at Walmart.

I'd oil it down with ATF and store each press in a proper size cardboard box. All a plastic wrap will do is trap atmospheric humidity in place.

And I suppose I'd try to find a woman who can provide for me better. ??
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