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Old November 17, 2014, 04:42 PM   #1
scottycoyote
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someone recommend me a hunting/long range plinking rifle?

recently ive been wanting to learn to shoot at longer ranges for the fun of it, and there are a couple of ranges and schools fairly nearby that i can participate in. I really dont have a desire for a standalone plinking setup, id want to be able to deer hunt with it as well. Caliber will be 308. I wanted some recommendations for a rifle that is sturdy and accurate enough for a day of shooting (say 100 to 200 rounds), but yet light enough it could serve as a hunter. Adjustable trigger would be nice, i dont want to get the gun and then have to spend another couple of hundred on addons (other than the scope of course but thats a different discussion). I was thinking of spending no more than $800 for the rifle.
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Old November 17, 2014, 05:33 PM   #2
AllenJ
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Depending on how you hunt take a look at the Savage Precision Carbine. It has a mid weight barrel on it and is not as heavy as other "varmint/tactical" rifles I've looked at. It would be a decent "in between" rifle IMO.
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Old November 17, 2014, 06:20 PM   #3
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I like the Ruger American and Remington 78/700
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Old November 18, 2014, 08:47 AM   #4
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I am a big fan of the Ruger American
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Old November 18, 2014, 10:58 AM   #5
scottycoyote
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i have a ruger american in 270 already, i agree its a great gun and would definitely handle the hunting part of the equation, i was just thinking about the target/plinking end i might need something a little more heavy duty
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Old November 18, 2014, 06:01 PM   #6
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How does plinking call for something more heavy duty? Maybe it's a preference thing but I prefer heavy duty in my hunting rifle, with all the hiking and whatnot
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Old November 19, 2014, 11:51 AM   #7
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"How does plinking call for something more heavy duty? Maybe it's a preference thing but I prefer heavy duty in my hunting rifle, with all the hiking and whatnot"

i just wonder if some of these rifles could stand up to shooting 200 rounds at a time. Not saying they cant, but when i think about my hunting rifles, after the initial site in some of mine only get shot a couple of times a year.
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Old November 19, 2014, 12:25 PM   #8
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Scotty, I agree, some of my hunting rifles have 5 shots getting sighted in and then I can count the skins and tell you how many shots the rifle has had in the last 5 years...

I would go with a heavy barrel 223 {for plinking and medium range hunting 223 is a great round, 308 gets expensive and has some pop to it} , If you could stretch that budget a bit, you will never go wrong with the rem 700 platform, and if possible something with the 5r rifling, and from there the sky is the limit, if you like it, a jewel trigger will get you to love it...

If I was spending $800 I would get a Remington # 85539 $680 I would drop in a Jewel 700/40x trigger $235... I know that is over $800 but it would be worth it...
Then grab a stock you like, bottom metal with detachable mag, ect ect ect ect...

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Old November 19, 2014, 03:05 PM   #9
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Since you already have a ruger american you could certainly stick with that platform so the feel stays similar. Or pick up a varmit weight Savage 11/111 or similar with synthetic stock, put on a decent to good scope suitable for whatever range/games you are going to play and happily use it. You already have a .270 for hunting so I personally would lean toward a .223, cheaper ammo lets you shoot more which is always a good thing.
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Old November 20, 2014, 11:17 AM   #10
scottycoyote
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thanks for the recommendations.

I cant go 223 because i wanted to use the gun for deer, here in va you have to get above 23 caliber to be legal. Plus for shooting at 1000 yards i think i need something more in the 30 cal class.
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Old November 20, 2014, 07:05 PM   #11
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Remington SPS Varmint or Sendero would be the lowest cost rifle I'd recommend.

The sky's the limit on cost for what you want, depending on whether you want competition quality, or just something to please you.

Custom rifles can give you the accuracy you want, but at a price of up to $4,000. Commercial rifles will be in the 1-2,000 range. Savage make some nice ones that shoot well, but I'm partial to Remingtons.

Custom rifles, mostly based on Remington actions, have been doing it right. That's a good way to go if you can spend to get the best.

Accuracy costs money. How accurate do you want to be?
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Old November 20, 2014, 07:53 PM   #12
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From what I've observed, the most accurate and reliable shoulder-fired box-magazine rifles with conventional stocks have been built around second-hand cheap Winchester 70 actions. Typically for much less than what's thought by most.

A Savage is probably the best choice for a commercial one costing right "C" notes. They have the best track record in competition these days.
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Old November 20, 2014, 08:09 PM   #13
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It also seems a bit odd to want to hunt with the same rifle as you want to go long range with.

You have a 270 for hunting.

Maximize the rifle you want for long range.

308 would be it for sure if you go the 1000 yd distance (or better yet, 338 Lapua!
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Old November 22, 2014, 03:59 PM   #14
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Quote:
From what I've observed, the most accurate and reliable shoulder-fired box-magazine rifles with conventional stocks have been built around second-hand cheap Winchester 70 actions. Typically for much less than what's thought by most.
I've never heard anyone other than you make that claim

The majority would have said "Remington", and the majority of the evidence supports that
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Old November 22, 2014, 04:01 PM   #15
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How does plinking call for something more heavy duty?
I took that phrase to simply mean the rifle wont be used for competition shooting, with the "long range" portion of the comment being the reason for a more "heavy duty" rifle

Another thing often forgotten is that, in the Southeast, there are areas with HUGE farm fields.

Many seem to have the idea anything East of the Mississippi means short range woods hunting.

Do a search on "bean field rifles" and you'll find many hunt with what could pass for benchrest guns, and kill deer at extreme long range
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Old November 22, 2014, 04:35 PM   #16
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Maybe I and some others have seen or heard of more and better evidence than those championing the Remingtons. Now you've read otherwise.

The fact that Winnie's are near 3 times stiffer and resist torquing better than the Remmies helps. Few people realize these advantages. The more recoil they have, the more these advantages help. It was pip-squeak tiny cartridges that made cheap, flimsy, lightweight round receivers they were made for popular with accuracy buffs.
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Old November 22, 2014, 04:43 PM   #17
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i just wonder if some of these rifles could stand up to shooting 200 rounds at a time. Not saying they cant, but when i think about my hunting rifles, after the initial site in some of mine only get shot a couple of times a year.
November 18, 2014 07:01 PM
The hunting rifle in a caliber like 270 will certainly shoot 200 rounds of full house loads- (don't shoot it so fast the barrel burns you) .....but the shooter would be a bit worse for wear after that .....


I used to shoot 100+ rounds a day at prairie dogs with my 270WIN ..... 90 to 110 grain bullets handloaded to about 3000 f/sec ...... great practice for hunting- if you learn to hit grassrats from field positions, the Bambi's boiler room is a piece of cake ....

Only shooting your hunting riflea few times a year is handicapping yourself...... you should be as familiar with your hunting rifle as possible, able to aquire a target and work the gun without thinking about it .....
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Old November 22, 2014, 04:43 PM   #18
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At first glance I'm thinking you need two rifles or at least a swap barrel rifle (Savage). One heavy barrel for long range and a sportier barrel for hunting, or be prepared to lug around a very, very heavy rifle while hunting.
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Old November 22, 2014, 04:45 PM   #19
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....


This fascination with light weight rifles ...... how about you handle a a heavy rifle enough that is does not feel "heavy"?
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Old November 22, 2014, 04:56 PM   #20
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Works for me, assuming your young and/or healthy enough to accomplish that feat. Me, I'm too old to for all that.
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Old November 22, 2014, 05:28 PM   #21
Bart B.
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Regarding rifles standing up to hundreds....

Winchester and Remington based rifles have been shot over 350 times a day in competition with four people shooting 88 rounds each. Each person shot 44 rounds about one minute apart in two 22-shot strings and four 10-shot strings of rapid fire in 60 seconds each after 4 sighters. The rifle lost about 10% of its barrel life but no other issues.
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Old November 22, 2014, 07:20 PM   #22
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308 is fine, if that's a final decision on the OP's part, but let me suggest 260 or 6.5 Creedmore. The recoil is minimal and accuracy (with the right rifle) is excellent. Bullet BC is high on the 6.5 cal long range bullets. Probably best for those calibers though, if the OP is a reloader.

I bought a Tikka and had a #4 contour barrel in 260 put on it and I am very pleased. I hunt with it, plink with it, and punch paper with it. Admittedly, I'm not into long distance shooting, but did tap a hog at 500 a while back.

I keep telling myself that I should grab the 270 for deer, or the 220 for coyotes, or the 223 for coyotes, but that 260 (stainless T3 Lite) just keeps sticking to my hand.
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Old November 22, 2014, 10:30 PM   #23
edward hogan
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Do you handload? One rifle, three purposes really calls for it; outright beckons...

Why .308? Bore or .308win ctg?


For plinking, shooting "distance", and even hunting with handloads on game up to white tail deer; might consider the Tikka T3 in .223rem with the 1:8 twist barrel.

Not a likely choice if your gonna hunt dense woods or heavy animals, but with Premium bullets like Nosler partition in 60gr or others up to 70gr you can take game animals; IF legal to hunt with a centerfire .22 in your state or hunt zone.

Want real long-distance accuracy? Go with a Tikka varmint again with the 1:8 twist barrel. Very fine weapon for hunter or shooter who can place their shots, and won't force a shot they don't have in a woodsy setting.


Really, if you handload you can make almost any cartridge work for you in the arenas you identified. .308win is a great one. The .260rem has greater distance potential and a bit less recoil, while the .223rem will really perform with right barrel twist and heavier bullets out to 500/700yds for targets. The .308 is reliable out to maybe 800yds, and the .260rem will surpass that.

Not really gonna see the greatest results from a hunting barreled gun unless you get lucky. The T-3 is a great value for its performance.

If you can use the .223 in the field, worth looking into...
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Old November 23, 2014, 08:32 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edward hogan
might consider the Tikka T3 in .223rem with the 1:8 twist barrel.
The OP indicated .223 is out because it's not legal for deer in their state.

I do agree about Tikka T3s, though. Though I'd recommend any of the T3s, I recently bought a Tikka T3 CTR, and I'm very impressed with it. Dead nuts accurate right out of the box, good trigger, a bolt that's slicker'n snot, a 10-round detachable mag, and a muzzle that's threaded for a suppressor. I bought it for mid-range tactical precision matches, but it'd be a great hunting rifle as well.

This particular model (the CTR) is available in .308 and .260. I bought the .260, and think I'd still choose that chambering over .308 for when I stretch my legs to 1000 yards. Its a dandy deer cartridge to boot.
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Old November 23, 2014, 09:02 AM   #25
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Beware of this ffl gun dealer

Beware of this guy. His name is Adam C McLaughlin and he use to operate a business out of his home called Wise Wildlife Solutions. He is known for taking deposits on guns to be ordered and then not delivery. He is screening his calls with voicemail. He lives in the highland village, tx area. If you have been ripped off by this guy please contact me via CL email. We are getting ready to notify BATF, state and local law authorities. Don't ususally rat people out but what do you do when someone takes your money and then thinks they have the right to screw you on the deal. This is nothing less than fraud and since he has a FFL we are hoping the penalty will be severe enough to keep this sort of fraud from becoming a regular way of doing business. The amount of money he has taken from one individual is $600+.
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