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Old November 27, 2012, 11:35 PM   #1
Prof Young
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swaged plated bullets in 45 colt?????

Loaders:
So, I've made the new bee mistake of buying swaged plated bullets in 45 cal wanting to load them for my 45 colt. Well, there is no formula for plated bullets that go with 45 colt. I'm guessing these bullets are intended for 45 ACP. Or are they just better bullets that one would waste by shooting out of 45 colt?

Dare I load them with the formula for the same weight jacketed or XTP bullets in 45 colt? Or should I try to sell them to someone else and learn from the mistake?

Live well, be safe.
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Old November 28, 2012, 02:00 AM   #2
Lost Sheep
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Thanks for asking our advice.

Short answers:

Load plated bullets with Lead bullet data.

They are not THAT much better than cast lead bullets and I doubt you spent a lot more than you would have for lead did you? I would shoot them. You should be able to trade them off if you decide to but don't take a beating on any trade you may make.

I have not heard of swaged plated bullets, but assuming neither of us misunderstand, I will go with your bullets as I understand your description.

Plated bullets have plating that is much thinner than jackets. They are generally loaded to specifications for lead bullets. Maybe a little hotter.

NEVER roll a crimp into the sides of a plated bullet. If you cut through the plating (I am told) you can wind up with parts of the plating being left in the barrel. Barrel obstructions are bad for your health and for the health of your gun.

If the bullets fit your chamber throats and barrel bore, your bullets are fine to shoot out of your 45 Colt. Do you have a caliper or micrometer? You may want to slug your bore and throats.

In the meantime, take the cylinder out of your gun and see if the bullets will drop through the chamber throats. If it drops straight through without touching, your bullets may be (MIGHT BE) undersized for your gun. Many older and replica 45s are set up for .454" diameter slugs. Most 45 ACP and modern 45 caliber slugs intended for 45 ACP are .451" in diameter.

For more expert advice, do a search on phrases like "Chamber Throat", "Bore Slugging", "45 ACP in 45 Colt" and the like. Whatever may apply to your gun and slugs.

Good luck

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Old November 28, 2012, 07:00 PM   #3
Hammerhead
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I load plated bullets to jacketed data in the .45 Colt and other handgun calibers. Stay 10% below max.
The danger with lead data is that recommended start loads could lead to a bullet stuck in the bore. It happened to me with a plated wadcutter in a .357.
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Old November 29, 2012, 10:06 PM   #4
Prof Young
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Thanks

Hammerhead and Lost Sheep:
Thanks. That helps a lot. There bullets are manufactured by Berrys (http://www.berrysmfg.com) and the box says "Swaged Plated" Truth is I don't know shat "swaged" means. Both the 230 grain round nose and the 200 grain hollow points are .452 in diameter.

I shooting these out of my Henry Golden Big Boy 45 Colt lever action rifle.

Any further advice would be appreciated.

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Old November 30, 2012, 10:18 AM   #5
Hammerhead
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Swaged bullets are formed in a die under high pressure that forces the cold lead to flow into the shape of a bullet.

I've had good luck with 200 grain plated SWC's in my single shot .45 Colt carbine. Very accurate.

Sticking a bullet in the bore is a very real danger with plated bullets in a carbine. Starting lead data might be too low to get them out of the barrel.

With plated bullets I like to look at both lead data and jacketed data and use charges that are listed in both sets of data. Usually that means going with the starting load listed for jacketed bullets and working up but going no higher than the top lead load.

Or just go with Trail Boss. 6.5 grains of Trail Boss is my go to load for any 200 to 230 grain, lead or plated bullet. It fills the case well improving safety and accuracy.

Don't over flare your cases. Flare just enough to get the bullets started. You need good bullet tension to keep the bullets from moving under recoil.
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Old November 30, 2012, 05:25 PM   #6
Prof Young
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Thanks.

Hammerhead:
Thanks. I think I will go ahead and load these, paying attention to your advice.
Live Well, Be safe
Prof Young
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Old December 2, 2012, 01:00 PM   #7
02bigdogs17
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If you are shooting these out of a rifle deffinetly do not use bottom charge for lead. I would start with bottom range for jacketed. Plated bullets are good for about 1200fps.
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Old December 3, 2012, 05:46 PM   #8
mmb713
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I've loaded plated bullets in 45 Colt, 45 Auto, 357 Mag and 9mm for years, mostly Xtremes since back when they were called West Coast bullets. They advertise their bullets as having thicker plating than other's and they are double struck to assure quality and consistency. I can't say for sure if their claims are true but I have gotten excellent results with them. Your .452" bullets are for 45 Auto but they can be made to work in 45 Colt cases. I would taper crimp them with a 45 Auto die. In 45 Colt I've always used Xtreme's 255gr flat point which is made for 45 Colt. Out of my Blackhawk if they are pushed too hard accuracy goes to hell but if I keep them below 1000fps they are one of the most accurate bullets I've shot in any cartridge. My pet load right now consists of a heavy charge of Universal, about half a grain over what Hodgdon calls for with the 250gr XTP in an SAA. Brian Pierce in a recent article in Handloader said this much Universal behind the same weight lead bullets is perfectly fine for a Blackhawk or 45 Colt rifle, and that's where my SDs came down and the accuracy is outstanding. A little stout maybe for an SAA but still under 1000fps from my 5.5" Blackhawk. I use a Lee FCD to put a light roll crimp on them, 1/2 a turn only, and it works great and doesn't bother the plating a bit. If I were you I'd load up and shoot the bullets you've got and then switch to a heavier bullet intended for 45 Colt. Or shoot them in a 45 Auto if you've got one and start over with 45 Colt bullets.
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Old December 3, 2012, 05:52 PM   #9
schmellba99
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What most everybody here said - with a carbine, use jacketed recipes and stay around 10% under max jacketed loads.

With pistols, I've never had any issues loading to lead specs. Berry's used to be my favorite "cheap" projectile, but the last few times I priced them they were suddenly not nearly as cheap.
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