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Old November 4, 2012, 08:53 PM   #1
Smit
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Stippling Question

I recently saw a post where people were sharing photos of their stippling jobs. I have recently acquired a Glock 20 which I am considering.
How do you stipple?

I heard you take a dremmel to it, but I am sure there is more to it than that. Thanks,
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Old November 4, 2012, 08:58 PM   #2
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Haven't tried it yet personally, but I believe the most common tool for stippling polymer is a electric soldering iron. Get it up to temp and press it firmly into the polymer in a semi-irregular pattern, then lightly sand down the stippled area for comfort.
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Old November 4, 2012, 10:11 PM   #3
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Just keep in mind that if you stipple a Glock, even a bit, you've voided the warranty. Glock may still back the pistol for some things, but that will be entirely at their discretion and you'll have zero recourse.

That's not me telling you not to do it, I'm just passing along the warning. I only own one Glock and it's my EDC and I had my buddy take a Dremel to it after it's FIRST range trip. We did not stipple it, I still haven't found any need to do that, but we did some selective carving with the Dremel and I'm as happy with the results now, four-plus years after the grinding took place as I was then.

If I somehow ended up with another G29 and had to keep it--I'd grind the same places.
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Old November 4, 2012, 11:27 PM   #4
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You're not going to hurt the value of a Glock (or any other polymer pistol that I can think of) appreciably by stippling, so do what you want. But I'd try grip or skateboard tape first. If nothing else you can better determine the areas you need it before making permanent modifications.
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Old November 5, 2012, 09:24 AM   #5
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One of the "pen" type soldering guns is normally whats used. How you do it depends on what type of end result you want, and what tip you use. If you search "Glock stippling" in Google under "images", youll get a number of different examples.

Before I started on my first gun, I did a bunch of practice runs on some old plastic grips I had around. Its good practice, lets you experiment with different things, and gives you an idea as to what to expect and how you might want to proceed. Different plastics do react differently too, so keep that in mind. A Glock knife gives a pretty good idea as to what expect with a Glock. The knife also benefits greatly form having it done.

I prefer to use a finely pointed tip when I do it. I usually file the sharpest tip to a sharper point with a fine file. You dont have to put much weight behind it, or push to hard, lighter is better until you get the hang of it.

With the Glocks (and other things), I melt down the molded in checkering/raised bumps/edges first, so they are closer to even with the rest of the grip, then I decide on the limits of the outline, and usually follow the natural lines on the gun when I do it. Then I go around the outline, and work from the outline in. The outline, and what close to it are the most tedious part. This is where you really need to go slow and take your time. Once you get in away from the outlines, you can relax go at a faster pace. Its still kind of slow and tedious, and usually takes me about 3-4 hours to do the whole grip. Depending on how you do it, it may go quicker or longer.

I prefer a fine, sandpaper/cat tongue type texture. I leave it as it ends up, and dont use sandpaper on it (even then, if I wanted it finer, Id still use the iron, but just go lighter, making the finish finer, no sandpaper). I like it a little more on the aggressive side. You may want to consider not doing the under side of the "beavertail" area of the grip at first, at least until you see how you like it. I found I like it better when its done. What you will quickly find is, this type finish will quickly "exfoliate" your hand where it contacts the grip. I work with my hands, and they are pretty rough, if your hands arent as rough, you may want to go easier on the texture. One thing nice about doing this, (other than the outlines) its pretty hard to screw it up, and you can go back and "adjust" things, make them finer/coarser, expand the coverage, etc. if you feel the need. Its better to do less initially, and expand later. Once you do it, its not going back to what it was if you find you didnt want to go that far.
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Old November 5, 2012, 10:02 AM   #6
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I think stippling a Glock does hurt its resale value. Lots of people do this in their garages, and I would have no idea what exactly had been done to the frame. I simply wouldn't buy one that has been stippled. Whether true or not, I have a perception that it weakens the frame, or can cause it to deteriorate faster. When you do this, you are applying enough heat to alter the frame structure, hundreds of times.

I have an older 2-pin Glock 17. While I am not all that accurate with it, I've never felt that the grip is "slippery". But, I suppose if I was going to turn it into a competition gun and fire 50,000+ rounds out of it, I wouldn't worry too much about stippling, as it would be a well worn gun once I'm done with it, and I would have gotten my $500 worth out of it 5 times over. Anything I get for it after that would just be gravy.
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Old November 5, 2012, 10:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
I think stippling a Glock does hurt its resale value.
Yeah, but reducing the value by a half is only two or three three tanks of gas....

It's not like tig welding rails on a mint WWII 1911.
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Old November 5, 2012, 10:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
I think stippling a Glock does hurt its resale value.
This is a definite "maybe".

I think it would depend on a number of factors. Here, Ive seen a couple of Glocks now that were stippled in a local shop, and they didnt sit on the shelves long, and they were not at a "reduced" price. Some people know the benefits and are willing to go with it. If you dont like it, thats fine too, no one is making you go that route.

So far, anyone who has held and/or shot my Glocks that were stippled, liked the feel and handling of them. I have yet to have a complaint, and most who have Glocks themselves and have shot mine, have asked where to get it done, or if Id do theirs.

Quote:
When you do this, you are applying enough heat to alter the frame structure, hundreds of times.
I suppose if you were bearing down and really going deep into the frame, you might. Mine are simply a surface thing, and barely go beneath the surface. All Im doing is changing the texture.

Quote:
I've never felt that the grip is "slippery".
You must not shoot it much with wet or sweaty hands. The difference in grip and handling between the one that is and one that isnt, is instantly noticeable, wet or dry.

The only Glocks I havent felt the need to stipple, are the RTF2 guns I have, as I feel they are the "perfect" Glock grip, and not in need of any improvement. For some reason, many seem to feel they are to aggressive. I dont. To bad Glock stopped making them.

As far as durability, I have a 17 that is going to surpass 50000 rounds this year, and a 26 that will pass 20000 rounds, and both have been stippled from basically the first rounds through them. They show very little signs of wear, with the frame or any other part of the gun for that matter. Only the barrel, front sight, and slide stop show any finish wear. Ive actually touched up the stippling a couple of times too, as over time and hard use, it tends to lose a little of its "sharpness", and a quick going over restores the initial feel.
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Old November 5, 2012, 12:11 PM   #9
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I've stippled a few guns and some plastic grips from 3rd Generation S&W pistols. If you really feel the need to stipple your gun then do yourself a favor, get yourself some crappy plastic grips from the parts box of your local gun shop and practice different techniques. That's what I did. I didn't want my gun to be the test case. Examine some photos of different styles of stippling too. Practice, practice, practice. Get good at it before doing it to your gun.
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Old November 5, 2012, 12:57 PM   #10
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I have used different tips because I wanted different effects. I do a lot of outside work so I have rough calloused hands and polymer generally feels slippery to me.

The worst thing that can happen is you ruin the frame, send it to Glock with $40 for a new frame. It is a Glock for godsakes, not a Colt or a S&W. That is why I like them, if I ruin it for $400 bucks I can have another just like it.
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Old November 5, 2012, 01:46 PM   #11
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I see Glock 17 frames selling for around $150 (none in the $40 range, though). I suppose if I wanted to stipple a Glock 17, I'd consider finding a used frame, hoping to find one in the $120 range. That way I always have my number's matched frame/slide.

Glocks are cheap now. How cheap do you think they will be if the next President bans them?
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Old November 5, 2012, 01:49 PM   #12
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Quote:
send it to Glock with $40 for a new frame.
Nanuk,

Saw this in your last post and have some questions.

!-$40 is all they charge for a new frame? That would not include shipping to and fro. What is that cost....shipping?

2- I'd read that the frame is actually what the BATF actually considers the registered part of a Glock pistol. What does Glock do in the event of a frame change....you get the same original serial number back?

3-I don't live in Ga (where Glock is). If I have to send a pistol to Glock (for any reason) is there a need to ship it via a FFL?

I have no interest in stippling, but I have seen a mod that is interesting on Youtube. It is called "Glock 26L"....basically it's where a compact Glock's grip is shorted to subcompact length. If I do decide to do this to my G23, and I screw up or don't like it, it'd be nice to know what a stock Glock replacement will cost.....shipping and all.
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