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Old November 1, 2012, 05:13 PM   #1
Keepin_Jeepin
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Info on this 6.5mm Swedish rifle

Hi,

another gun from grandpas collection. I dont know anything about it or if its safe to shoot.... Anything would be appreciated, thanks
















Thanks!
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Old November 1, 2012, 05:15 PM   #2
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Old November 1, 2012, 06:11 PM   #3
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well I don;t know a lot about them as I am still learning but I can tell you that the bolt and bolt release are not original to the rifle. every single piece on swedes have a serial number that matches the last 3 of the rifle serial number. the bolt is all taken from another rifle and the bolt release came from somewhere else. it looks like it's in decent enough condition and the swedish mausers were not prone to the same failures as early springfields but something looks off to me.

someone will come along with a lot more knowledge than I though so good luck with the search.
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Old November 1, 2012, 06:23 PM   #4
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Nice M94 carbine.

http://www.milsurps.com/content.php?...wedish-Carbine
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Old November 1, 2012, 06:23 PM   #5
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Karbin m/94

I believe it was never standard infantery issue, more like certain personel and in the navy and so on.

maybe not shot the hottest commercial loads or handloads?

But I think and somebody should correct me if I am wrong, you don't have many factory original 6.5x55 rifles on the market in the US and the ammo availble is kinda made for the surplus swedish mausers? just like factory 45-70 or something is loaded weak so you don't load your wild west winchester with modern ammo and blow it up
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Old November 1, 2012, 08:19 PM   #6
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Assembled by Interarms and given the completely bogus designation "G33/50" to get around import quantity restrictions.
Generally considered to be parts guns---hence the non-matching numbers.
Where it says "INTERARMCO G33/50", there used to be a date.
-----krinko

"But I think and somebody should correct me if I am wrong, you don't have many factory original 6.5x55 rifles on the market in the US...'

Husqvarna,
You mean aside from the thousands of Swedish Mausers?
In addition to four Carl Gustafs, I also have a Norwegian Krag and a Danish Schulz & Larsen barreled 98k club rifle in 6.5x55.
I have not noticed anything like the "stepped" power rating of .45-70 as far as the 6.5x55 ammunition made in the US, or the foreign made brands that are available here.
-----krinko

Last edited by krinko; November 1, 2012 at 08:32 PM.
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Old November 2, 2012, 01:41 AM   #7
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Thanks for all the info...... is this really a circa 1907 gun as that link suggests? What is considered hot and not for this weapon? If it is really a hundred years old I probably will not be shooting it anyways. Thanks so far!
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Old November 2, 2012, 04:24 AM   #8
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Keep Jeepin
Buy some 6.5 swede ammo and shoot it. A sweet shooter, those little carbines, in that caliber. Handy. Good for deer, elk or even moose if you need to shoot Bullwinkle. Effective round.

I shoot my 1900 Obie Swede M96 and have no issues other than old eyes and open sights trying to shoot a very accurate rifle that is 112 years old and going strong.

That is a very nice little rifle you have sir. Deserves to be shot... or not. Your call of course. But don't worry about putting ammo thru it. The weak link in the 6.5x55 family will be the Norge Krags, hardly ever find a Swede with factory ammo power issues (I did have some old PMC ammo that got kinda sticky and a primer or two bulged... did not shoot the rest of the box, bt that was back in the late 80s) Stick with Privi, or any other brand of ammo, should be good to go.

Reloading can bring about happiness (do a search using WildAlaska and 6.5x55, you'll find some good info)
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Old November 2, 2012, 12:18 PM   #9
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Quote:
Thanks for all the info...... is this really a circa 1907 gun as that link suggests? What is considered hot and not for this weapon? If it is really a hundred years old I probably will not be shooting it anyways. Thanks so far!
for what it's worth, some people still hunt with civil war era muzzle loaders, not exactly how I would treat a 150 year old war relic but assuming that they have been properly stored and maintained most military firearms can last a VERY long time in operating condition.
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Old November 2, 2012, 02:26 PM   #10
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The Swede M96 is a very STRONG action. What is lacks is the gas handling safety features of the M98 action.

I'm sure my Swedes will be shooting long after I'm buried.

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Old November 2, 2012, 02:30 PM   #11
Keepin_Jeepin
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Great thanks ill be careful about ammo and it looks like I have a shooter here, perfect!
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Old November 2, 2012, 04:01 PM   #12
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Quote:
If it is really a hundred years old I probably will not be shooting it anyways.
As long as it's not damaged, it can take it. I have an M96 with a 1901 receiver and a CG63 with a 1903 receiver and shoot them at least once a month.
Swedish steel is tough, it'll stand up to regular use. Not to say you should get stupid with it and handload beyond normal 6.5x55 pressures, but good handloads or factory loads are good to go.
If you've never shot the 6.5x55...you're in for a real treat!
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Old November 3, 2012, 04:22 AM   #13
Keepin_Jeepin
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I cant wait!! Thanks!!
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Old November 3, 2012, 07:51 AM   #14
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I shoot my 1917 Carl Gustafs 96 long rifle all the time. There is just something about the 6.5X55 cartridge and the Swedish rifle that makes for a very sweet shooting combination.

Mine is insanely accurate for a military rifle.

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Old November 3, 2012, 08:45 AM   #15
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"There is just something about the 6.5X55 cartridge and the Swedish rifle that makes for a very sweet shooting combination."

Absolutely.





-----krinko
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Old November 3, 2012, 08:55 AM   #16
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What you are reading is people’s satisfaction with their Swedish rifles but don’t get carried away with the enthusiasm. Your rifle should be perfectly safe with Swedish service ammunition, it should be perfectly safe with ammunition loaded to Swedish service rifle pressures but Swedish service rifle ammunition is not that hot. I don’t know if anyone is selling a +P 6.5 X55, but just in case, don’t let fans convictions about “Swedish Steel”, its supposed strength and durability fool you into sticking hot loads into your rifle. It was not designed for it and its pre WW1 metallurgy may not support it. People just do not understand how primitive process controls and metallurgy were back than and these old plain carbon steel receivers will break with the sort of abuse that would only damage a modern receiver.

I am certain that the owner of this receiver took too literally claims of “Swedish Steel” being superior and hot rodded his rifle.



These are velocities of Swedish service rifle ammunition from a couple of my rifles. These loads are absolutely fine as is.

M1896 Infantry Rifle 29' barrel Carl Gustafs mfgr 1903

17-Aug-06 T = 85 °F
143 gr FMJ 1986 Swedish Ball

Ave Vel = 2610
Std Dev = 14.38
ES = 45.59
High = 2633
Low = 2587
N = 8



M38 Infantry Carbine 24" barrel
28-Oct-94 T ≈ 60 °F

143 gr 1986 Swedish Ball OAL 3.065" 47.4 grs powder average

Ave Vel = 2427
Std Dev = 22
ES = 62
Low = 2395
High = 2457
N = 10
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Old November 3, 2012, 09:56 AM   #17
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Buy a box of any of the large ammo mfg. in the 120gr.-140gr. variety.

Remington, Federal, Hornady, Prvi Partizan etc. will work.
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Old November 4, 2012, 03:32 AM   #18
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6.5x55 Swede = Performance

The Swede's run just fine in the parameters (pressures) they were designed for.
And probably the most accurate of milsurps in general, cept maybe the Persians.
If one wants a 6.5 Hot Rod, go with a Grendel, Creedmore or 6.5 Mag and let the Swede do what it always does, "Perform" at lower pressures.
I like them old mauser rounds (7x57, 7.65x53, 8x57, etc...) that get it done without a lot of muzzle blast or recoil. They take game just fine when you respect their limitations and use accordingly.
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Old November 5, 2012, 10:47 PM   #19
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Get the headspace checked, use commercial 6.5x55mm ammo (or surplus if you can find it - good luck), and enjoy!

yes, the old gun's metalurgy isn't up to modern standards...yes, the swede round is a 40Kpsi pressure class, and yes, its not as fast as higher pressure (and more modern) rounds.

Swede rifles were considered primo for their era, because Swedish steel was the "best", in those days. Its a 95 Mauser action, which lacks the "safety lug" found on the 98 Mauser (which only does anything when something goes badly wrong, anyway), and lacks the flange on the bolt shroud to help deflect gas (again, only when something goes badly wrong), and its cock on closing, which is something some people don't mind.

Something to be aware of, most (if not all) the Swedes were set up for the 160gr military ammo, and will shoot high with other loads. And they were zeroed for 300 meters, if I remember right.

Replacement front sights of different heights are available, and I would recommend checking into getting one if you plan to shoot a 140gr (or other weight) bullet.

The 6.5x55mm has a long history, and an excellent reputation, because they work well, are accurate, and have low recoil (compared to most other military rounds of the era). The Swede's long bullets hold velocity very well, and actually shoot flatter than many .30-06 loadings.

DO NOT try to hot rod that rifle! If you want more than it is designed to give, get something else. But what it is designed to give is plenty for almost anything, and it will still give it, as good as it did when it was new (assuming it's in good mechanical shape).

If you can shoot open sights, you've got an excellent woods gun for deer, just the way it is, and quite capable of 300yd shots, if you are!

I have one of the long rifles (1917 mfg) and can easily tag the 400yd gong at the range, without even raising the sights! (140gr speer bullet and mid-level charge of IMR 4320).
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Old November 6, 2012, 11:35 AM   #20
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Go to the GUNBOARDS.COM web site. They have a forum that deals with Swedish Mausers. The moderators of that forum are unbelievably knowledgeable about Swedes. I wouldn't be completely surprised if they knew the name of the children of the man who forged the reciever of your rifle. Check out the site you'll be thoroughly informed.
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Old November 6, 2012, 04:17 PM   #21
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The 6.5x55 service load was generally around 45k CUP. But all the actions were proofed up to 66k PSI (or the CUP equivalent). To get a catastrophic failure on a Swede action takes about the same level of carelessness as it does on a newer action.

I switched over to neck sizing my 6.5x55 brass as the chambers are "generous" to say the least. Some folks say you can use Lapua brass and full length size every time, but the chamber in my M38 was enough to cause bulging between 1/3 and 1/2 up the body from the case head on the first firing. Can't blame the Winchester brass for bulging into a chamber that oversized.

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Old November 6, 2012, 05:49 PM   #22
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Add me to the list of people who have sent rounds out of hundred year old tubes.
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Old November 8, 2012, 01:59 AM   #23
Keepin_Jeepin
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Great thanks for all the Info.

Ron, I will have a look over there thank you
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Old December 8, 2012, 02:23 AM   #24
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swedish steel

The Swedes DID NOT USE PLAIN CARBON STEEL in their M96s. They alloyed with nickel, copper, and vanadium. That's why they are still goin strong. Low phosphorus iron ore alloyed with these made a very strong, corrosion resistant firearms. The only problem is the gas system if you loaded too hot or had a Burst casing, ruptured primer. That's not very likely to happen using new factory ammo or in-spec reloads using quality new supplies. I have a 1906 & 1907 M96s. They quickly became my favorites. 06 is sporterized and has a Barska 8-32x44 SWAT scope while I let the 07 remain in its full military glory. I'd love to own that lil 18" 1894 karbin. Be sure to check your headspace before shooting. My 06 was re-arsenenaled and the bolt was over-stamped to match the reciever. Yours isn't so I'd be sure to check the headspace first...Load a shell and see how the bolt closes first then place a piece of tape on the case head and check for resistance while trying to close the bolt. It should be hard to close ......you'll love it after the 1st shot.
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Old December 8, 2012, 07:49 AM   #25
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Jimro, Yes the Swedes service ammo is about 45- 46KCUP. But you are wrong about 66K PSI. They were proofed at 66KCUP. Old pressure data often used crusher methods and expressed it as PSI.

Slam, Would you not think that loaded ammo by Norma, RWS, and some other Euro companies are +P. Their pressures typically run 50KCUP and are sold to be used in the Swedes 94 and 96 actions. Yeah, I know that the reloading site for Norma says to use "strong and modern" actions with their reload data. So why is there no disclaimer not to use Norma's loaded 6.5X55 in the Swede service rifles(including the Swede's one locking lugged Krag-Jorgenson)? Norma uses the 96 actions in developing and testing their 6.6X55ammo.
The CG-63 is a 96 action remade(they started making them in 1963) by the Swedes and although most are in 6.5X55; CG, Norma and others did make them in 308 and 7.92X57. 308 would probaly be closer to ++P.

Keepin Jeepin, Commercially made ammo that you find should be fine in your rifle.
If you reload, don't start out hotrodding the old girl. Work up slowly and safely or you may get a rifle like the one Slam pictured.

As Jimro stated the Swede actions are strong but lack a superior gas handling system like the 98 mauser. Best to All

Last edited by lonniemike; December 8, 2012 at 08:00 AM.
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