The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: General Handgun Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old November 6, 2012, 07:33 AM   #1
Tinknocker
Junior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2012
Location: Westland Mi
Posts: 1
1st time hand gun buyer

My question is i am 70 years old and wife 66 we want to buy a hand gun but are worried about recoil. I was going to buy a 380 but was told it was hard gun to control. Any way if you have any ideas would like hearing about it. I do have a 30/30 and a 12 ga shotgun but the shot gun is getting to be alot for me and wife cant shoot it. We want it mostly for home ortection but i may go for a ccw after i buy a gun. Thanks for any help you can offer. Michael Grassel
Tinknocker is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 07:38 AM   #2
youngunz4life
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 15, 2010
Location: United States of America
Posts: 1,877
I recommend a .38 special "snubby"(short-barreled) revolver smith&wesson

I believe this will cover every base for what you are looking for and asking...
__________________
"Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" -Admiral Farragut @ Battle of Mobile Bay 05AUG1864
youngunz4life is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 07:39 AM   #3
Sparks1957
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 4, 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 1,467
I would recommend a revolver (.38/357) or a mid-size semiauto in 9mm (like the Sig 2022 or a CZ P-01) myself... others will chime in
Sparks1957 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 08:11 AM   #4
Pistolgripshotty
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2012
Location: Somewhere out there
Posts: 184
A mid-size 9mm should be a perfect fit. Consider a .25 ACP as well
__________________
12 Gauge Fury!
Pistolgripshotty is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 08:13 AM   #5
Crow Hunter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2012
Posts: 1,078
How much handgun shooting experience do you have?

How is you and your wifes hand strength?

Any issues with arthritis?

My mother is 68, I tried to set her up with an automatic. She could not operate it well.

My brother and I have since set her up with a DA revolver that she could.

My experience with .380 is unless it is one of the "oversize" ones like the Beretta Cheetah, it will be much more painful to shoot than a 9mm.

Best bet would be either going to a range and trying out several guns or getting a friend you know to let you try some out.
__________________
I am no longer participating in gun forums.

Good luck.
Crow Hunter is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 08:38 AM   #6
Zulu343
Member
 
Join Date: February 12, 2009
Posts: 24
I agree with others - a medium-weight gun in either 38 or 9mm, depending on which platform you prefer. If it's solely for home defense, a larger gun such as the beretta or taurus 92 is very manageable to shoot.
Zulu343 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 08:45 AM   #7
h2otoo
Member
 
Join Date: October 29, 2012
Posts: 77
If you could find a used (no longer made) Beretta 86 check it out. It's a pop up barrel 380 and a sweet heart to shoot. Little recoil and no need to rack the slid. BUT, good luck finding one. I bought one when they first came out and will never get rid of it.

Bob
h2otoo is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 08:46 AM   #8
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 1,972
Yep...Smith J-Frame .38 and use standard .38 loads.
buck460XVR is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 11:10 AM   #9
surveyor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 13, 2007
Posts: 336
I'd listen to crow hunter on this one..as well as gak..

look at a 357/38 in a medium frame 3-4"
in a Smith and wesson a K frame
in a ruger a GP or a six series


if a semi auto, providing no issues with operation and hand strength
a 9mm duty size 4-5" barrel..

these work well for home defense and range use..
there may be better options for CCW though..
but the smaller and lighter the gun, the more the recoil is felt..

Last edited by surveyor; November 6, 2012 at 11:21 AM.
surveyor is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 11:12 AM   #10
gak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 28, 2005
Location: Aridzona
Posts: 2,767
4" S&W .38 medium ("K") frame. Perhaps the most common/popular handgun ever made, for good reason. Flat out works. The Model 10 is the one that put the marque and format on the map for most folks. Subsequent "numbers" are basically different variations on the same theme.
A similar format Smith Model 65 .357 in holy grail 3" (IMO) or always "safe" 4", (but loaded usually with .38s or .38+Ps for the OP"sd purpose) - if you can find one within your budget.

Then add some nice comfy grips to help increase controllability and lessen felt recoil further - Hogue Monogrip/fingergroove - if you like soft "grippy" (somewhat sticky/tacky) feel--some do, some don't--or as I prefer Pachmayrs such as their Compac model - if less so.

Last edited by gak; November 6, 2012 at 11:30 AM.
gak is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 11:29 AM   #11
jimbob86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2007
Location: All the way to NEBRASKA
Posts: 6,702
Quote:
I was going to buy a 380 but was told it was hard gun to control.
.380 has a reputation being hard to control because most guns chambered for it are tiny pocket guns that weigh next to nothing and that you can not get much of a grip on.

A full sized .380, as Crowhunter said, such as the Beretta Cheetah, would be easier to control than a 9mm of similar size/weight...... less force involved, same weight (inertia) to resist it = less recoil.

Some seasoned citizens lack the hand strength to work a slide on an auto pistol easily .... Beretta used to make a tip-barrel model (Model 86, IIRC) that eliminated that need...... I do not know if it is still made.

One for sale here (bad picture):

http://www.gunsamerica.com/916863141...ACP_Tip_up.htm

This one sold already, but has a better picture:
http://www.gunauction.com/buy/101378....380-semi-auto
__________________
TheGolden Rule of Tool Use: "If you don't know what you are doing, DON'T."

http://nefirearm.com/
jimbob86 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 01:22 PM   #12
chrisp51
Member
 
Join Date: April 25, 2012
Location: NC
Posts: 80
A 7 round Stainless Taurus Tracker with a 4 inch barrel in .357 mag. It is compensated and does a great job with +P .38 special ammo. It also costs a lot less than a comparable S+W.
chrisp51 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 01:28 PM   #13
sserdlihc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 10, 2008
Location: S.C.
Posts: 1,434
A 25 acp is a joke.
Stick with a 9mm. Ammo is plentiful, recoil is very manageable and you have alot of options for firearms.
__________________
Familiarity breeds contempt, while rarity wins admiration. Aupleius
If someone doesn't like you, that's their problem! Milton Childress
sserdlihc is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 01:45 PM   #14
jimbob86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2007
Location: All the way to NEBRASKA
Posts: 6,702
Quote:
Stick with a 9mm. Ammo is plentiful, recoil is very manageable
recoil is a subjective thing.

I bet you will see that differently when you are 70......
__________________
TheGolden Rule of Tool Use: "If you don't know what you are doing, DON'T."

http://nefirearm.com/
jimbob86 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 02:15 PM   #15
Crow Hunter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2012
Posts: 1,078
Quote:
recoil is a subjective thing.

I bet you will see that differently when you are 70......
And/or have arthritic hands.
__________________
I am no longer participating in gun forums.

Good luck.
Crow Hunter is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 02:29 PM   #16
Woody55
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 19, 2012
Location: East Texas
Posts: 407
Like many of the others above, I suggest a .38 Special revolver.

You don't need anything small and light, because you won't be carrying it concealed. So, a medium sized weapon with maybe a 4" barrel should work fine.

Many women have trouble with semi-automatic pistols because it can be hard to load the spring fed magazines and hard to work the slide to chamber the first round. The revolver avoids all that.

A revolver is easier to understand and use than a semi-automatic pistol.

And .38 Speical ammunition is easy to find and less expensive than most.

I wouldn't worry about getting something that will shoot the higher pressure .38 rounds or the .357 Magnum. The recoil will be heavier, the weapon and ammunition will be more expensive. And my opinion has always been that just by owning and knowing how to use a firearm, you will have mitigated the risk enough.
Woody55 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 02:30 PM   #17
langenc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 19, 2007
Location: Montmorency Co, MI
Posts: 1,187
If only for in the home/on the premesis go with a 38 J frame or larger. The revolver would be better for wife and yourself. Get some 'mild' loads for practice--and do practice. 100 rounds/each/year.
Maybe some friend will load some lower power 38s for you. Id help you, on my equip, if you lived around here.
langenc is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 03:37 PM   #18
TailGator
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 8, 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,968
Quote:
.380 has a reputation being hard to control because most guns chambered for it are tiny pocket guns that weigh next to nothing and that you can not get much of a grip on.
That was my thought, as well. Overall, mass reduces perceived recoil; hence the recommendation for medium to large sized revolvers firing relatively mild .38 special. This would also give you the choice between single action and double action.

The other consideration is that the mechanics of a semiautomatic reduces recoil by converting some of the recoil energy into mechanical work (with my apologies to the physics majors out there if I didn't get the terminology quite correct). Perhaps the most extreme example of this among handguns is the Beretta PX4 compact and full-sized models, which have rotating barrels in addition to the usual slide action.

My daughter has a PX4 Compact, and it is an extremely soft shooter. I can imagine it or its big brother being an excellent choice for someone in your situation. [Note: Beretta also makes a subcompact pistol in the same line, and it lacks the rotating barrel feature. It is supposed to be a good little pistol in its own right, but you should be aware that it will have more recoil than its stable-mates.]
TailGator is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 04:00 PM   #19
johnwilliamson062
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 16, 2008
Posts: 6,759
Don't get anubby or compact unless you want to carry the thing. If it is to replace the shotgun in the home only getting a small handgun makes no sense.

Revolvers do seem to be easier for people with arthritis. Charter Arms makes a few that have a decent reputation for being utilitarian.

Colt Police Positive in 38 S&W(used). They are cheap. The trigger is great. The round is in between a 380 and 9mm as far as power. It is a pricey, but if you are just going to shoot it a few times then throw it in a drawer for just in case I don't think $5 extra on that one box of ammo is much of a concern.

S&W model 10 is more or less the same deal in a little bigger package and using 38 special, which is a more common round.

If yo go for an auto and get a medium framed one in 380 it should be REALLY easy to handle. I think CZ makes one, but I am not sure.
__________________
$0 of an NRA membership goes to legislative action or court battles. Not a dime. Only money contributed to the NRA-ILA or NRA-PVF. You could just donate to the Second Amendment Foundation
First Shotgun Thread First Rifle Thread First Pistol Thread
johnwilliamson062 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 04:18 PM   #20
45YearsShooting
Member
 
Join Date: September 9, 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 98
I'm trying to keep this as simple as possible:

.380: A bad choice for you. These guns are generally too small and light, and may kick a lot.

.38 revolver: Good choice; maybe the best choice, but only if you get a 4 or 6-inch barrel and steel frame. A 6-inch barreled revolver is not a good choice for concealed carry.

9mm auto: Good choice, but only if you prefer an auto to a revolver, and only if you stay away from the very small and light 9mm autos. Make sure both you and wife can pull back the slide and load magazines. I like Glocks because they are simple.

Anything else: A bad choice.
45YearsShooting is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 06:18 PM   #21
sagamore
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 16, 2010
Posts: 13
A few years ago when I was buying my first handgun, I took a course at a local indoor range called “Introduction to Handguns.” The instructor went over the characteristics of both revolvers and automatics, and devoted a great deal of time towards safety. The make-up of the class was very interesting — there were several families — mom, dad, and their teenage kids. When the lecture portion was over the class was escorted to the range section of the facility to try any handgun in the rental fleet. Other than the class expense, we only paid for the ammo we used.
Here is a google search for your area for indoor ranges (LINK). My suggestion would be to find a range that will allow you two to try out a variety of weapons.
sagamore is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 06:33 PM   #22
Ozzieman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 14, 2004
Location: Northern Indiana
Posts: 4,922
A lot of good advice here but my first suggestion is to find a reputable gun store and let them show you a selection of guns.
The last thing I would suggest is a semi auto, many people cannot load or clear due to the heavy spring that hold the slide closed. The other reason is that there are controls on an auto, slide release and safety that you must remember if you need to use it.
A revolver is easy to load, unload and if you have a failure to fire you just pull the trigger again.
Sagamore has a very good point. Many gun stores that have ranges will also have rental guns. If you take a simple shooters course that many of them offer you will be able to shoot several guns they have on hand.
Also look for a shooting clubs, there are many of them that if you join will also offer courses.
The big thing here is that you need to purchase a gun that both you and your wife need to be able to shoot, load and unload safely.
__________________
“Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading.” – Thomas Jefferson.

Politician's are like diapers.
You need to change them often,,,,, for the same reason!
Ozzieman is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 06:46 PM   #23
RamItOne
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 24, 2011
Posts: 976
Perhaps a K frame

Not making light of older people, but you see them more so than other age groups carrying fanny packs, they make plenty for CCW. A K frame would help tame the .357 and really make the 38 easy to shoot for an older person.


http://ccwsupply.biz/WaistPacksPAGE.htm

good luck and hope you find something that fits your needs.
__________________
M&P- the other dark meat

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/pet...rtant/DJyvnHz0
RamItOne is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 08:27 PM   #24
jimbob86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2007
Location: All the way to NEBRASKA
Posts: 6,702
Quote:
.380: A bad choice for you. These guns are generally too small and light, and may kick a lot.
In post #11, I gave a link to a Beretta Model 86 that solves that.... generally, you are throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

The biggest problem I have with the .380 is the increased cost over 9mm ..... you are getting less and paying more ..... in some cases, 5-6 dollars more/box, due to the economy of scale w/ the 9mm.
__________________
TheGolden Rule of Tool Use: "If you don't know what you are doing, DON'T."

http://nefirearm.com/
jimbob86 is offline  
Old November 6, 2012, 10:47 PM   #25
Elmer
Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2008
Posts: 65
Quote:
Colt Police Positive in 38 S&W(used). They are cheap. The trigger is great.
The Colt triggers are some of the worst that I own....
Elmer is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.13761 seconds with 9 queries