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Old October 24, 2012, 10:19 PM   #1
Colorado Redneck
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Does Remington anneal their brass?

222 Rem. cases are developing splits in the necks after three or four reloadings. The brass is FL sized before first loading, and then neck sized the following 3 times or so. Not exeeding loads from manuels. The only other brass I have seen split like this was 22 Hornet cases after several neck sizings. I have some 22-250 brass that was bought new and has been loaded probably 10 times. No cases split yet. All R-P brass.

Is it unreasonable to expect brass to last for more than 4 reloads?

Looks like I may have to try to anneal my own. There are some good threads here in TFL so this will be another interesting phase of hand loading. If anybody has suggestions for a newbie that would be great.
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Old October 24, 2012, 10:45 PM   #2
Jimro
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All necks eventually split.

Anneal your necks after the first reloading. I use a propane plumbers torch and hold until the brass gets hot in my fingers. Not exactly scientific, but it is to a count of nine which about 6 or 7 seconds in the flame.

I know of a reloader who anneals every time, and I guess that is because he pays for Lapua brass. Every other time seems to work for a bolt gun, and in a semi auto, anneal with the first reload, then chuck after four reloads.

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Old October 26, 2012, 08:12 AM   #3
Bart B.
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Yes, Remington anneals their case necks to make them more ductile than the case body. So does all case makers.

How much is probably the issue. Also the more a case neck expands when fired plus the more it's sized back down in the die, the more work hardened the case neck gets. This, coupled with harder brass to start with, results in cracks in the case neck to appear sooner.
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Old October 26, 2012, 11:22 AM   #4
F. Guffey
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"Does Remington anneal their cases?"

Yes, Remington anneals their cases as many as 6 times+ from start to finish, one manufacture decided they would reduce that number, the cases were sold as scrap, no clue how many cases escaped to be used by reloaders, I have 150, by the time I was made aware there was/could be a problem I had fired most of them. Firing the cases worked the cases back in shape, the risk, they claimed "If the case last that long".

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Old October 26, 2012, 09:34 PM   #5
Colorado Redneck
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Thanks for the remarks

In my limited experience the 222 cases seemed to crack sooner than any other. And it was merely a rhetorical question about Remington, as the necks are not discolored like some images show after the brass is annealed.
I shoulda known they do anneal.

Anyway, after reading quite a bit of info about this process, I set up a variable speed drill with a socket that fit 22-250 brass (I have quite a bit of that) and then fiddled around getting the little propane torch set right. Held the drill at a fairly low speed with rubber bands on the trigger. Covered the window in the garage, and went after it. My attempt was not productive.

Couldn't really see the case neck change colors as the torch was lighting up the case. Dropped three in the bucket of water after they heated for 10-12 seconds (no color change I could see.) Then turned on the lights, fished them out and tried the vise grip test (barely deforming the neck mouth) and they sprung right back, the brass still looked like new. Decided I had not heated the cases hot enough. Ok, well then, heat one till it does change color that is visible to me. Took quite a while, maybe 18 seconds, and the instant it looked like it was starting to change colors, threw it in the bucket. Same deal, tried the vise grip thing and it was softer than heck. Overdone.

So maybe just buying another couple hundred cases is the better deal for me. Kinda looks like I am a slow learner.
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Old October 26, 2012, 09:38 PM   #6
Kevin Rohrer
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My Remington .221FB cases are splitting after one firing, and am not happy as they cost a premium. I plan to anneal them before doing any more reloading.
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Old October 27, 2012, 07:41 AM   #7
Bart B.
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Note that annealed case necks usually have discoloration on them as well as part of their shoulders. Many companies polish their cases after annealing so they look good for sales just like bullet companies polish their stuff. This usually gets rid of the surface discoloration and the case looks the same all over; outside and inside. Arsenal cases are not polished and their neck discoloration is easily seen.

Doiing hardness tests on cases is the only sure way to see how hard or soft their areas are.
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