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Old October 27, 2012, 06:09 PM   #1
grdpounder
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CMP Store M1 Garand Questions

The wife and I are going to take a drive to the CMP South store in early Nov to pick out a Service Grade Garand to add to my collection of 20th century American battle rifles. My question is what should I be looking for? I am not interested in finding that rare piece (although that would be great) I just want a serviceable example of one of the greatest fighting rifles in history. I will be firing this weapon so its not going to be a safe queen any input would be helpful. Thanks in advance.
Al
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Old October 27, 2012, 06:29 PM   #2
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In property it's "Location, location, location".

In guns it's "Condition, condition, condition".

What to get depends on whether you want a WWII era rifle or a post-war rifle, but in all cases, try for the best condition you can find.

The rifles will be rated by overall condition and the condition of the barrel, measured with a special gage that shows the wear of the barrel throat.
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Old October 27, 2012, 06:44 PM   #3
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Look for one that looks nice. They'll function or the armors wouldn't put them on the floor.

Borrow a set of gages, (the staff will be more then willing to help you), check the muzzle and throat. That and if the barrel looks good with a bore light you're good to go.

Now you can pay for your new Garand and take it home or have the CMP ship it for you. Just be aware the sales tax for Alabama or Ohio will be more then the shipping cost.
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Old October 28, 2012, 09:25 PM   #4
chris in va
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I went to the North store and got my $495 Field grade.

The staff is uber helpful. You simply give them your driver's license and they let you borrow a muzzle/chamber gauge. Drop it in every muzzle you want and find the Garand for 'you'.

Mine had rough...er, CHARACTER wood but gauged at 1.5. It has been a fantastic shooter.

I simply ask that you do one thing after taking your Garand home. Whenever you go to the range and happen to see a kid shooting with their parent(s), offer to let them put a clip through it. It's one of the most rewarding things you can do at the range. Let them keep the clip as a souvenir.
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Old October 28, 2012, 09:54 PM   #5
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Thanks

Thanks for all the advice, but I need a little more in site on the measurements I should be looking for. Is there a on line reference I can use? Thanks again.
Al
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Old October 28, 2012, 10:18 PM   #6
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The throat gage measures from 0 - 10, the smaller the number, the thigher (Less wear) of the chamber.

The Muzzle gage goes from 0-2, again, the smaller then number, or closest to zero, the less muzzle wear.
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Old October 30, 2012, 02:37 PM   #7
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My recommendation is to get a Service Grade rifle with the lowest throat & muzzle wear you can find. The Service Grades truly represent the best value in my opinion, and they can still have a very nice finish.

Beyond that, it's just personal preference. Do you want a Springfield or H&R rifle? USGI or new CMP wood? It's still possible to find WWII serial numbers on the SG Springfields as well.

Last edited by Fishbed77; October 30, 2012 at 03:01 PM.
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Old October 30, 2012, 02:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
My recommendation is to get a Service Grade rifle with the lowest throat & muzzle wear you can find. The Service Grades truly represent the best value in my opinion, and they can still have a very nice finish.


Agreed; my service grade has been great.
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Old October 30, 2012, 06:12 PM   #9
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Can't Wait

I am really looking forward to this trip, thanks for all the replies.
Al
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Old October 30, 2012, 07:31 PM   #10
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ploufedaddy

is that one of the new production stocks on your service grade or is that really the condition of their USGI stocks?
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Old October 30, 2012, 09:36 PM   #11
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It's new. I only put a sticky note for a certain serial number range (when my maternal grandparents worked at SA making these guns). I got the requested serial number and a new stock to boot.
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Old October 31, 2012, 12:07 AM   #12
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beautiful rifle, I bet shes a shooter
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Old October 31, 2012, 12:44 AM   #13
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Look for a crisp receiver

I'm not sure how to explain what I mean, but there shouldn't be a lot of wavy surfaces. Grooves and rails should be straight and smooth. You can rebarrel but you can't really replace the receiver. (If you could, you should just keep it on the other rifle...it'd be like keeping the mast and replacing the rest of the sailboat)

http://www.garandgear.com/m1-garand-...art-inspection

Enjoy your trip. I would love to spend a few days and a few thousand there.
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Old October 31, 2012, 04:58 PM   #14
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Since we're showing off pretty Service Grades, here's mine to hopefully get you excited about your trip to Anniston. I received her via mail-order from the CMP in June.

She's a 1944 Springfield Armory with a like-new 1954 Springfield barrel (with some incredible muzzle/throat wear numbers), and a beautiful CMP black walnut stock. She runs like a dream. Shooting a Garand is like no other firearm.





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Old October 31, 2012, 05:35 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishbed77
Since we're showing off pretty Service Grades, here's mine to hopefully get you excited about your trip to Anniston. I received her via mail-order from the CMP in June.
Pretty.

Out of curiosity, how long was the turnaround with yours?
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Old November 1, 2012, 12:02 PM   #16
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Quote:
Pretty.

Out of curiosity, how long was the turnaround with yours?
Mailed order my form on May 4, received the rifle on June 1.

There is a running thread at the CMP Garand forum where folks track order to delivery times.

Last edited by Fishbed77; November 5, 2012 at 09:06 AM.
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Old November 1, 2012, 05:35 PM   #17
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Ah, interesting. I checked the thread and looks like they've been running in the neighborhood of 5 weeks or so lately. Not too bad.

Knowing my luck, it will finally ship during the one week this month I'm out of town.
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Old November 3, 2012, 09:05 PM   #18
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Just remember when looking at the pics of other peoples service grade rifles, the ones with new walnut stocks generally cost a whole lot more than the new birch stocks. If you want a shooter, a service grade with a birch stock for $625 or whatever the current price is, is a better deal than $950 for a service grade special with a walnut stock.

Hope you enjoy the trip. I had a great time on my trip to the north store.
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Old November 3, 2012, 09:50 PM   #19
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Aside from overall condition and throat/muzzle wear, there are a few additional things to look for . . .

Sight. Be sure the rear aperture is firm - no "wiggle" - and both windage and elevation work OK.

I've read that sometimes - rarely - a rifle with a lockbar rear sight shows up; these are sought after.

Aside from condition, Springfield Armory rifles with higher serial numbers are said to exhibit the best workmanship. The CMP just sold a batch in the 6,xxx,xxx range; the 5,9xx,xxx is next most desirable, and so forth and so on. They'll have been rebuilt at least once, though, so they won't have all original parts. So condition is more important than serial number. (And of course, some people want a WWII, not a post-war, rifle.)

Enjoy - I've got three CMP M1s and they're a lot of fun.
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Old November 3, 2012, 10:05 PM   #20
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Have a chat with a gent named Leon who is the most visible, and blunt, behind-the-counter CMP Armorer that you're likely to see.

Buy as much ammunition as you can afford. Cost works out to be about .50 per round.

Buy books and a bayonet.

Get the hat.

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Old November 5, 2012, 04:52 AM   #21
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saltydog452:

Which type/length of bayonet was the most common on the M-1 in most WW2 combat theaters?
Also, is there a good website which depicts the average market price for a specific length, assuming that 'fake' repros were not produced?

An authentic version probably wouldn't look new anyway, but I would not want a "Mitchell's Mauser" type of fake, if you know what I mean.
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Old November 5, 2012, 09:11 AM   #22
Fishbed77
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Quote:
Just remember when looking at the pics of other peoples service grade rifles, the ones with new walnut stocks generally cost a whole lot more than the new birch stocks. If you want a shooter, a service grade with a birch stock for $625 or whatever the current price is, is a better deal than $950 for a service grade special with a walnut stock.
My Service Grade rifle with a CMP walnut stock (shown above) was $625. It is not a $950 Service Grade Special.

At some point this past spring, the CMP started shipping some Service Grade rifles with CMP walnut. I placed a sticky note on my order form requesting a WWII serial and a walnut stock, and got both.
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Old November 5, 2012, 12:42 PM   #23
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It's my understanding most of the 16" bayonets were cut down to a shorter length as WW2 saw less trench warfare and longer versions were seen as unwieldy.
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Old November 5, 2012, 02:47 PM   #24
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Noob here throwing up a first post. I have a '55 SA Garand which is a CMP gun. Finish is amazing, and I can pull down less than 3" groups at a little over 100 yds. It is in collecter grade condition with all date coded parts. The Garand is one of the few guns that will retain/gain value even if you shoot it. No matter what you get, go out and enjoy. As previously stated, there is nothing like shooting one. When I get home from my deployment, I am going to make a trip to Anniston and pick up another one and some more ammo.
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Old November 8, 2012, 09:52 PM   #25
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On the way

The wife and I are on the way to CMP South (10 hrs round trip) tomorrow to (hopefully) pick out my new to me Garand. Pics will follow, and thanks for all the replies.
Al
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