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Old October 20, 2014, 10:06 PM   #1
jerad188
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Why is my case getting bulged out?

Ruger 204 , when I go to seat the bullet, SOMETIMES (not always) my bullets come out like this up by the neck
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Old October 20, 2014, 10:46 PM   #2
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Are your cases all the same length?

If any are a little longer they could be hit by the seating die

You can try backing the die out a tiny bit, and readjusting the seating stem
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Old October 20, 2014, 10:48 PM   #3
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If you are not chamfering the inside case neck you should start. Aside from that your seater die should be adjusted up a half turn and again return your overall length to spec. Are you crimping the neck at all? There is no need to crimp this round.
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Old October 20, 2014, 11:02 PM   #4
condor bravo
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Somewhat of a common problem. Simply you are crimping wifh too much force which causes the shoulder to collapse. Back off on the seating die to lessen the force that is applied to the crimping shoulder within the die. The rounds as is will no doubt not chamber. Dissasemble those
and resize the cases.

Last edited by condor bravo; October 20, 2014 at 11:20 PM.
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Old October 21, 2014, 05:30 AM   #5
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Thanks all, will do
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Old October 21, 2014, 06:22 AM   #6
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But if I remember correctly I raised the case in the die and it went smooth and didn't bottom out, then I put the bullet in and waa-laa, crushed
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Old October 21, 2014, 07:14 AM   #7
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I got a lot of those when I first started doing rifle cartridges. I made the mistake of trying to crimp them while seating the bullet like I do with pistol cartridges. Back your die out so that it does not crimp, and then readjust dept with bullet seater stem.

The reason it does not do it to all is slight variations in case length.
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Old October 21, 2014, 07:38 AM   #8
steve4102
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This is a classic sign of the seating die not adjusted properly.

Take a sized trimmed case and place it into the shell holder.

Raise the ram all the way to the top.

Screw the seating die into the press until you feel it make contact the case mouth.

Back the die OUT of the press at least one full turn and lock it down.
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Old October 21, 2014, 08:00 AM   #9
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Quote:
I raised the case in the die and it went smooth and didn't bottom out, then I put the bullet in and waa-laa, crushed
Why would you run a case into the die for the purpose of checking your die position? If you run the neck into the crimp zone of the die, enough to unknowingly change the neck dimension, what do you think is going to happen when you then cram a bullet into the case? Viola!

The only way to insure that you are not crimping as you seat, is to raise your ram and run your die down til it touches the shell holder, then back your die out two or three turns. Place a case in the shell holder with a bullet and start seating it. If you feel or see any indication of crimp engagement, stop and further adust the die off the shell holder. As noted by snyper, a long case will occassionally gum up the works. It is much easier to sort out the long brass than disassemble rounds.
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Old October 21, 2014, 08:18 AM   #10
F. Guffey
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We all know the seating die does not have case body support and seating a bullet 'in some of my presses' can be accomplished with the weight of the handle or less when the bullet is centered in the case mouth.

I start with a case in the shell holder, I raise the ram, then, I adjust the die down to the mouth of the case until it makes contact. After contact I adjust the die off to prevent the crimp portion of the die making contact with the case. After backing the die off I secure the die to the press with the lock ring.

Before seating a bullet I back the seating stem off then use a transfer to adjust the height of the seating stem or I back the seating stem off and place a bullet on the case to be seated, then I raise the ram and adjust the seating stem. You know, adjust, seat then check and continue until I have the seating depth/length.

If a crimp is desired I use a transfer, I adjust the die to crimp then adjust the seating stem height. I seat bullets in cases with the maximum bullet hold, I want all the hold I can get.

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Old October 21, 2014, 08:37 AM   #11
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could he fix those case by neck sizing with the de-capper removed? while still loaded?

just curious
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Old October 21, 2014, 08:46 AM   #12
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I have fixed some 300 Savage by firing them - of course they have to chamber.
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Old October 21, 2014, 08:53 AM   #13
F. Guffey
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Skizzums, The neck sizing die does not have case body support.

I will not make an attempt to size a loaded round, I would pull the bullet, dump the powder and then size the case. The de-capping pin could be removed to prevent removing the primer.

I do use a 45 ACP full length sizer die to remove the bulge caused by the bullet when seating. I have 2 pistols that like new ammo and does not like reloads that have the appearance the case swallowed a bullet.

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Old October 21, 2014, 09:43 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skizzums
could he fix those case by neck sizing with the de-capper removed? while still loaded?
No.

Two reasons, at least.

The neck die only sizes the neck, he has buckled the case at and below the shoulder.

One cannot run a loaded round through a Neck die or an FL die. The bullet has expanded the neck larger than the internal diameter of the neck area in a sizing die. If one were to actually do this it would reduce the diameter of the bullet significantly.
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Old October 21, 2014, 09:58 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve4102
…If one were to actually do this it would reduce the diameter of the bullet significantly.
I'd vote for it just crushing the shoulder even more; at least until it met the sides of the neck die.


Jerad188,

Here's a visual aid. It's the Lee seating die setup with crimp. When you don't want a crimp, just follow the video up to the point the die makes contact with the case, then back it out half a turn, lock it down and finish setting the seating depth. Ignore the last half turn downward in the video, as that sets the crimp.

The video calls that last adjustment "finicky" because it depends on the cases all being the same length to work correctly. This means trimming must be done after sizing (which is when the neck length grows) or you can end up with a collapsed shoulder because cases don't all grow by the same amount each time you size them. One that's longer than the rest can then suffer the fate of the one in your photo issue.
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Old October 21, 2014, 10:06 AM   #16
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sorry, didn't mean to say neck sizing. jus meant take out the pin, and run the case through the sizing die. but your right, I would queeze the bullet to a smller diameter
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Old October 21, 2014, 02:13 PM   #17
F. Guffey
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Skizzums, The naming of dies reminds me of the old days when wrestlers starting naming new procedures like the double step over toe hold with the half Nelson.

Some are claiming they are using profile dies and or a die they confused with a bump die that sized the case body and shoulder but they did not know that, now they are removing the neck sizing bushing on other dies to 'fix it' by sizing the loaded round.

Years ago the same ones dot dizzy and or passed out when I used a carbide full length sizer die to take bullets lines out of my cases.

I have 2 pistols that do not like cases that have the appearance of having swallowed a bullet.

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Old October 21, 2014, 05:30 PM   #18
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I've had the same problem as the OP. Trying to crimp rifle rounds with inconsistent case lengths. Can't be done. Period. Learned that pretty quickly.
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Old October 22, 2014, 12:17 AM   #19
trobin
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I had one the other day on a 270 win round. Body at shoulder should be .441 and mine measures .447. Not very much difference but sure won't chamber. My seating die must've been too low and this case was a tad too long. Gives me a good reason to buy a collet die to remove it.
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Old October 22, 2014, 08:06 AM   #20
F. Guffey
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Quote:
Gives me a good reason to buy a collet die to remove it.
I would need a better reason, the full length sizing die is .469" - a few at the opening. The full length sizing die will remove the upset shoulder crush.

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Old October 22, 2014, 11:02 AM   #21
condor bravo
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Buy a general purpose inertia bullet puller instead; never know when you might need to pull bullets again, for whatever caliber. Not sure I would attempt to iron out the bulge by running the live rounds through the sizing die.
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Old October 22, 2014, 04:10 PM   #22
jerad188
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I had watched a video on setting up the seating die, I wasn't paying close enough attention to example being used, it was a pistol round and he said to screw the die in until it makes contact with neck, my bad I forgot about it being responsible for crimping as well... I'm new sorry! Thanks for the quick help y'all
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Old October 23, 2014, 01:02 AM   #23
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Learning to reload is a process sometimes facilitated by making mistakes. My Grandad said if a person never made a mistake, it just shows how little they ever did. So don't be sorry. There will be more mistakes and questions, and you will continue to learn!

Welcome to TFL...
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