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Old October 11, 2012, 11:41 PM   #1
Tatfreak
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Buying locally?

I'm not new here, I just troll and read alot. 1st time posting. So here it goes.

When buying locally, what are the proper procedures on handling the weapon in question?
Is it ok to dry fire it?
I'm going to rack the slide a few times. It's posted as new in box(NIB).
Gimme the run down guys. Thanks in advance.
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Old October 11, 2012, 11:50 PM   #2
hAkron
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A person should always hand you a weapon with the action open so that both parties can verify that it's unloaded. When you pickup the gun you should verify its empty and ease the action closed. It is generally considered bad form to let the slide slam forward unassisted, or to snap the cylinder violently closed on a revolver.

Want to check the trigger? ASK if its ok to dry fire the gun. Some people would rather you didn't. If they say ok then you do it once, possibly twice to check the SA and the DA trigger pull. Always make sure you do that by pointing the gun in a safe direction.

Always be gentle and careful with a gun that isn't your property. Handle it like a valuable antique.
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Old October 12, 2012, 12:46 AM   #3
sigcurious
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Pretty much what hakron said. The only thing I would add is ask what direction they prefer as a safe direction for dry firing. Some shops have specific areas to point at, others don't seem to care as long as it's not at anyone.
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Old October 12, 2012, 01:14 AM   #4
warningshot
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Buy Walther PPQ, Glock 19 or 17, Sig 226R, or Ruger SRC9. All new. All in 9mm. Buy 1 case of 1000 rounds, 115 or 124 full metal jacket, Federal red box only, and send them down range in short order. Then call the All Knowing Gun Doctors again for another check-up.

Should any zombies get in the way before you call again just use a few of those FMJs on them and everything will be fine. Remember: follow these instructions to the letter and you will also look good while doing it.
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Old October 12, 2012, 01:28 AM   #5
Tatfreak
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Thanks guys I appreciate all the info. I'm going to look at a Glock 27 4th Gen. He's asking $450. It's not at a LGS.
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Old October 12, 2012, 06:21 AM   #6
Kreyzhorse
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Quote:
A person should always hand you a weapon with the action open so that both parties can verify that it's unloaded. When you pickup the gun you should verify its empty and ease the action closed. It is generally considered bad form to let the slide slam forward unassisted, or to snap the cylinder violently closed on a revolver.

Want to check the trigger? ASK if its ok to dry fire the gun. Some people would rather you didn't. If they say ok then you do it once, possibly twice to check the SA and the DA trigger pull. Always make sure you do that by pointing the gun in a safe direction.

Always be gentle and careful with a gun that isn't your property. Handle it like a valuable antique.
Sound advice.
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Old October 12, 2012, 08:29 AM   #7
AH.74
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Quote:
Always be gentle and careful with a gun that isn't your property. Handle it like a valuable antique.
And along these lines, I never drop the slide on an empty chamber. Always ease it closed.
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Old October 12, 2012, 11:04 AM   #8
gak
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...And it should go without sayng, but I still see it a lot - folks who inadvertently point the weapon at someone, a salesperson, bystander in the store. It often happens after initial inspection and "you" are just casually holding the gun and forget, distracted by conversation with the sales staff or sidebar with your companion. I'm not saying overtly aiming at someone--that (I hope) is much more rare--but unwittingly letting that barrel be pointed in someone's direction. I've got a friend that does this--very bad habit. Someone who knows guns and otherwise espouses safety. Amazes me...so, just to say, be ever--doubly--mindful. Rule #2 following insuring the chamber is clear.
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Old October 12, 2012, 11:59 AM   #9
H.W. French
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NIB?

You said it's posted as NIB. Is this new stock you are purchasing from a dealer/FFL-holder or one from a private non-FFL holder?
Once an item has been sold by a merchant to a consumer it can longer be considered NIB. It could be Like New In Box or even As New New In Box, but it is still considered used.
Even if it has never been fired, racked, cocked, turned or otherwise it is still considered used.
Use that information when negotiating on price.
It peeves me to see guys on auction sites attemting to pass off a gun as new because they never fired it, even though they bought it five years ago and tossed it in their safe.
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Old October 12, 2012, 02:41 PM   #10
Aguila Blanca
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I agree with what Mr. French wrote. I'm pretty certain that the description of the descriptions in the Blue Book of Gun Values states that "NIB" applies only to firearms that have never been sold at retail. Once a private owner buys it the best it can ever be is "Like" New In Box (LNIB).
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Old October 12, 2012, 08:13 PM   #11
Tatfreak
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Thanks fellas for the info. I picked up a Glock 27 4th Gen with TruGlo sights for $450. Never been fired and great condition. He let me do whatever I wanted to. Thanks for the help. "LNIB"
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Old October 13, 2012, 06:17 AM   #12
Toemoss
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To "troll" is a bad thing, the term you want is "lurk".
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Old October 13, 2012, 08:42 AM   #13
lee n. field
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Quote:
Is it ok to dry fire it?
I'm going to rack the slide a few times. It's posted as new in box(NIB).
Ask.

I assume this is a face to face private party purchase? I would expect to be able to dry fire, cycle the slide, and do (or have the seller do) a field strip (as for cleaning) to examine the internals of the gun.

Some guns the manufacture will say not to dry fire. In that case, bring snap caps.

Quote:
I'm going to look at a Glock 27 4th Gen. He's asking $450.
Glock, OK to dry fire. Takedown is trivial. Price is, I think, OK.

Quote:
I picked up a Glock 27 4th Gen with TruGlo sights for $450.
Ahhh, the further I read, the more I know. Price is good for gun with night sights.

Now go fix of that "never been fired" status.
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Old October 13, 2012, 08:47 AM   #14
Amsdorf
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+1 on always asking before:

Touching a weapon.
Handing it.
Operating it (dry fire).

The person handing it to you should always safety check it and assure it is clear, double check and hand it over with open bolt/slide locked, etc.

You should take the pistol or rifle and in safe direction, repeat the safety check assuring it is clear and safe.

Then, again, ask permission to dry fire.

Of course, if you go into a Cabelas, be prepared to be covered multiple times by a fiream muzzle since there are so many customers looking/handling weapons.

If you want to whine about that, don't go to a big gun shop. The extreme safety Nazis should just stay home.
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Old October 13, 2012, 08:57 AM   #15
MrGoodwrench
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Quote:
If you want to whine about that, don't go to a big gun shop. The extreme safety Nazis should just stay home
I typically do a lot more than whine when someone points a muzzle in my direction. I would hope noone with any common sense would take this lightly.

Snap caps are a good idea if you want to dry fire before purchase.
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