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Old September 28, 2012, 01:31 PM   #1
TheBear
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ruger single ten vs mark3

Im planing to use the gun mostly for small range pest controll.
which of the two is more accurate, low maintanance, more reliable? The guy at the gunstore said he would pick a mark3 over a .22 wheelgun anytime because the old revolver technology just cant keep up with pistols, but i kind of like the feeling of the single ten in my hands...I would also like to use reduced .22Z long ammo and .22shotshell but if the mark 3 really is that much better i would be able to live without them.
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Old September 28, 2012, 02:42 PM   #2
Newton24b
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from a user standpoint, if you want to use most low powered cartridges, you wil be nuts with a semi automatic. most will not cycle the slide. and some specialty loads do not function well in a semi auto due to cartridge shape.

basic accuracy should be the same. slight edge to semi auto having an ability to mount a good scope on it.
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Old September 28, 2012, 03:01 PM   #3
sigcurious
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what is .22Z ammo?
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Old September 28, 2012, 03:16 PM   #4
TheBear
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.22Z long is super reduced .22 ammo (770fps/29 grain projectile), the Z stands for "Zimmer" which is a german word and means "room" in english. Its basically indoor ammo.
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Old September 28, 2012, 03:17 PM   #5
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I was also unaware of a .22Z ammunition. As for pest control with rat shot(be aware you are talking really shot range with .22 shot cartridge) the revolver will be your best option, doubt that it will feed or cycle reliably in a semi auto. Accuracy is good with both revolver and auto loaders, if you wanted to get into bullseye match shooting the auto is superior in that timed and rapid fire are much easier. Revolvers also tend to take more abuse before the jam or fail to function.

Last edited by sgms; September 28, 2012 at 03:19 PM. Reason: Gotta learn to proof read
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Old September 28, 2012, 03:32 PM   #6
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Neat, learn about new stuff everyday!
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Old September 28, 2012, 07:41 PM   #7
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The Ruger Mark II/III/IV semi-autos (and the 22/45 variants) are okay to shoot but a real nuisance to detail strip. So bad, in fact, that at least one company sells a conversion to make reassembly possible for ordinary people.

I'd take the revolver any day. I personally don't like the Super Ten because ... well, because a six shooter shouldn't be a ten shooter. That said, if/when there are practical reasons for more rounds before reloading, then it's nice to have the capability.
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Old September 28, 2012, 07:59 PM   #8
Zhillsauditor
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Quote:
which of the two is more accurate,
I'd say the mark 3 gets a slight nod here, but both will be more accurate than many shooters.
Quote:
low maintanance,
Single ten. Normally, revolvers take more time to clean in my experience, but the take down of the mark 3 is a pain.
Quote:
more reliable?
Probably the single ten. I say probably as a good mark 3 can be very reliable. But, there is just not much that can go wrong with the single ten out of the box, so it would get the nod here.

I recently bought a used single ten. Buying the wolff spring replacements did wonders for the action, and I actually like it. As I have a hate-hate relationship with Ruger, that is a real compliment.
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Old September 28, 2012, 08:21 PM   #9
stu925
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As far as reliability goes, the single ten is probably going to be your better bet and it'll handle the special ammo where the MK III won't. Accuracy I'd have to guess the MK III is a bit better. I have not owned the single ten, I did own a single six which I traded off and don't miss. I always felt like I spent more time loading than shooting with the single six and mine wasn't anywhere near as accurate as my MK III.

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Old September 29, 2012, 12:56 AM   #10
Win73
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I have a Ruger MK II and a Ruger Single Six. But what I have found myself carrying when I am out and about is my S & W Model 317 Airlite. It is a three inch barrel adjustable sight eight shot revolver. It only weighs about 10 ounces. I hardly even notice it on my hip. I especially like it when riding my 4 wheeler or checking my trail cameras. And if you want it is small enough to conceal.

It can be shot double action or single action. And the swing out cylinder makes it much faster to reload.

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Old September 29, 2012, 02:33 AM   #11
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Quote:
The guy at the gunstore said he would pick a mark3 over a .22 wheelgun anytime because the old revolver technology just cant
Please, whatever you do, do not ask this guy for advice ever again
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Old September 29, 2012, 02:45 AM   #12
Lost Sheep
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Doesn't the Single Ten come with a 22 Magnum cylinder? That means you can run from 22 BBCap, 22 Zimmer, all the way up to 22 magnum.

edit: the Single Six has 6-shot cylinders in 22 and 22 magnum. Posts 14 and 20 inform me the Single 10 and Single 9 do not have interchangeable cylinders. Thanks, meanmachine1961 and TennJed. I have wanted a 10-shot 22 revolver but purposely avoided researching the Single 10 because once I have seen it, I know I will have budgetary cramps until I get it. I don't look forward to that.

I also own 3 Mark II and one Single Six and find accuracy comparable between the two types, except for my Mark II with the 10" Bull Barrel, which shoots like a rifle. But my 6" Dan Wesson 22 outshoots them and ties with the 10".

The stripping of the semi-auto is not that hard. Reassembly is always like putting together a puzzle. So, votes for the revolver.

Reloading during plinking sessions, hands down, the semi-auto, especially with the "Cliploader" tool I have. I can fill a magazine faster than I can shoot. Literally. So, unless you are on an ammunition diet, the semi.

I agree with TennJed. Old revolver technology just CAN, and very well, too. I suspect either the clerk was pushing inventory or has bought into the semi-auto hype and "THINKS" (the quotes are deliberate, because this is obviously is not thinking, but parroting) he has something to contribute to your purchasing decision.

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Last edited by Lost Sheep; September 29, 2012 at 07:00 PM.
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Old September 29, 2012, 02:51 AM   #13
Lost Sheep
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The ONE THING

The Single Ten fits your hand? Nothing else makes enough of a difference.

Your decision is made.

Now, use the clerk's misplaced disdain for revolver technology to beat him down on the price. Will serve him right.

Lost Sheep
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Old September 29, 2012, 02:56 AM   #14
meanmachine1961
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I believe the single ten is 22LR only. Ruger makes a single nine that is for magnums.
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Old September 29, 2012, 08:35 AM   #15
BillyJack3
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Both are great but I'd go Single 10 for what you are looking to do. Can't beat the reliability of a good wheel gun.
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Old September 29, 2012, 09:35 AM   #16
m_liebst
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Here's a 15 shot group done at 25 yards with the MKlll 22/45 5.5 inch barrel

Rested/ cheap pistol scope ( Nc Star 2.5 x 30)/ Fiocchi SM320 ammo.

Besides the 2 shots I pulled: ragged hole was 7/8 inch CTC

Not bad for a pistol that's out of the box/ no mods- (cept the scope)

5 shot groups are the norm for what most do for accuracy,.... anything 10 and more is gonna give a better idea on how precise those groups actually tend to be.

Now does anyone have any rested groups done on the single 10 to compare!?!>>>



Quote:
It can be shot double action or single action. And the swing out cylinder makes it much faster to reload.
The cylinder might be faster loading vs a mag,.... but not faster when I have several extra mags that have already been loaded

Last edited by m_liebst; September 29, 2012 at 10:25 AM.
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Old September 29, 2012, 10:06 AM   #17
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Accuracy testing my Single Six vs MKII , both with scopes , both shot from rests , the MKII outshoots the Single Six with ease. Still, the Single Six is an accurate revolver.

Shooting both , at 25 yards , standing, with open sights the difference is not as obvious. Both have had trigger work and the Single Six is just as crisp and even lighter.

On a rare occasion the MKII may have a malfunction. The Single Six has only failed to fire when there was a dud round.

Quote:
The Ruger Mark II/III/IV semi-autos (and the 22/45 variants) are okay to shoot but a real nuisance to detail strip. So bad, in fact, that at least one company sells a conversion to make reassembly possible for ordinary people.
In regards to strip down for cleaning the MKII is not the bear that some make it out to be. I would think the MKIII is the same. The pistol might be tight when brand new. Have owned at least 5 variants of the MKII series and the take down is not that hard , even for ordinary people.
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Old September 29, 2012, 10:22 AM   #18
m_liebst
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In regards to strip down for cleaning the MKII is not the bear that some make it out to be. I would think the MKIII is the same. The pistol might be tight when brand new. Have owned at least 5 variants of the MKII series and the take down is not that hard , even for ordinary people.
Most get it all wrong in regards to field stripping the Rugers.

Ya don't need to fully disassemble the barrel from the lower grip handle reciever to fully clean the pistol. Ya only need to do that when the fouling starts to affect the trigger assembly/ mag area,- which is every few thousnad rounds. I find That disassembly and reassembly can be done in seconds.

I've only needed fully disassembled mine 3 times in the 10 k i've put through it.

Hmmm... I'm a shooten today

Last edited by m_liebst; September 29, 2012 at 10:34 AM.
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Old September 29, 2012, 10:57 AM   #19
Win73
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Quote:
The cylinder might be faster loading vs a mag,.... but not faster when I have several extra mags that have already been loaded
I realize that. I was referring to reloading a double action revolver to a single action.
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Old September 29, 2012, 11:17 AM   #20
TennJed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meanmachine1961 View Post
I believe the single ten is 22LR only. Ruger makes a single nine that is for magnums.
That is correct, the single 10 does not have a convertible cylinder. I would have rather Ruger dropped it to 9 rounds instead of 10 and made it interchangable
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Old September 29, 2012, 11:30 AM   #21
pete2
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The MKIII is likely to be more accurate than the revolver, a little. I have a single six and a MKII, The auto may be more accurate but the revolver is accurate enough and it will not jam, it's much easier and faster to clean, will handle any ammo, fits better in a holster, no magazine to damage or misplace. My MARKII stays in the target box except at the range or during a match. The SS is my holster gun.
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Old September 29, 2012, 11:36 AM   #22
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The Ruger Mark II/III/IV semi-autos (and the 22/45 variants) are okay to shoot but a real nuisance to detail strip.
B.S. If you're not smart enough to figure how to quickly strip and reassemble a MK you probably don't have any business being around guns.

I'm a revolver guy hands down. So much so that I've sold off any/all my centerfire semi's. Being said, the MK series are the better guns. Easier to clean, very reliable, easier to load, more accurate, etc.

But Ruger .22lr wheelguns are very well made, accurate enough for about chore, handle well and will do one thing better than the MK, shoot a varity of ammo.

Either gun will out last you and your kids with minimal maintainence.
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Old September 29, 2012, 11:47 AM   #23
Aguila Blanca
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B.S. If you're not smart enough to figure how to quickly strip and reassemble a MK you probably don't have any business being around guns.
I'll be sure to pass that along to the owner and gunsmith at the range where I shoot, both of whom have over 25 years' experience working on firearms and both of whom curse loudly and long each time they have to clean the range's rental Ruger pistols.

I didn't say it couldn't be done. I said it's a nuisance. And it is.
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Old September 29, 2012, 12:30 PM   #24
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I said it's a nuisance. And it is.
Yes, it is. And the Mark III, with mag safety, is even worse than the Mark II--you actually have to insert the magazine into the pistol to reassemble it. Making the magazine "safety" one of the worse safety devices known to man.
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Old September 29, 2012, 01:02 PM   #25
Pilot
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I don't have a MK III, but I have FOUR Ruger MK II's. There is no problem in disasembling them for cleaning, and reasembling them. If I can do it, anybody can do it. One only needs to know how to read the manual the first few times. It is ridiculous to say that this is an issue.

I say find a used MK II, or get a MK III and take out the mag disconnect and LCI.
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