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Old September 28, 2012, 02:33 PM   #26
DFrame
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I thought buying more expensive equipment would make me a better shooter. PRACTICE makes better shooters.
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Old September 28, 2012, 03:37 PM   #27
StainlessSteel215
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DFrame that was a great post - me too!
Started out my firearms hobby with a brand new Glock23 (.40 cal) and thought that gun would make me a great shooter in a small time....WRONG.

I then moved to a Kimber Ultra Compact 1911 and developed VERY bad habits.

Good training and proper techniques with a smaller caliber gun like a 9mm go a long way. Glad I un-did all my bad practices in the first couple years. Now I can continue perfecting proper shooting until the groups get tight at 25 yards
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Old September 28, 2012, 03:46 PM   #28
Stressfire
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Hitting the mag release, thinking it was the safety
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Old September 28, 2012, 05:24 PM   #29
FloridaVeteran
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Rookie just with regard to one particular gun - I limp-wristed a .44 auto mag, causing it to stovepipe or fail-to-feed, can't remember. Was shooting it off a sandbag because it was a heavy pistol and a fairly distant target, whereas my .45s and other semi-autos I always shoot with no rest. Felt like a real doofus. My buddy, the owner, was decent enough not to rib me too much about it.
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Old September 28, 2012, 07:23 PM   #30
Peptobismol9
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I started with the 1895 Nagant Revolver cause it was cheap and I figured that if I could master that gun, let alone handle its trigger, I could handle anything. Now I can pick up just about anything and still impress my buddies. I did notice I had a bad habit of being to afraid of that cylinder gap. I adjusted my grip so much to where I was nowhere near it. It was really counter productive. I also tended to put way too much finger on the trigger. All the way up to the 2nd joint. It pulled the gun around alot on that heavy trigger pull.
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Old September 28, 2012, 10:25 PM   #31
pete2
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Failure to focus on the front sight, second is rushing the shot.
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Old September 29, 2012, 12:42 AM   #32
shortwave
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Thinking I could out shoot dad when I was about 17...again when I was about 30.
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Old September 29, 2012, 02:31 AM   #33
bamaranger
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focus

I did not understand sight focus........focus on the front sight.....target and rear blur.

These days, they all blur.........always.
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Old September 29, 2012, 08:35 AM   #34
GaryOlson
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All of the above, then overthinking the whole process, repeat all of the above, think some more, then fire off some shots in frustration without thinking.
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Old October 2, 2012, 01:18 AM   #35
Buzzcook
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Losing the front sight and too much trigger finger.

I tend to look at the target just as I shoot. That of course takes me away from the front sight. I shoot high when this happens.

I have long fingers it's easy and comfortable to loop my first knuckle over the trigger. Mostly that make me push the gun, sometimes I pull it.

In both cases the reason I make the mistake is lack of concentration.
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Old October 2, 2012, 03:15 AM   #36
fun2shoot
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Gripping the gun the right way. When I got the grip down It was so much easier.
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Old October 2, 2012, 04:52 AM   #37
Baylorattorney
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Pushing the shot rather than squeezing.
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Old October 2, 2012, 08:05 AM   #38
p loader
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1- Thinking just shooting more often would make me better

2- Not shooting with a purpose, not quantifying range results in order to measure improvements

3- Thinking I could learn it all myself, not attending training offered by professional shooters

4- Anticipating the shot, ball and dummy drills are great for this but you need two people

5- The wrong grip
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Old October 2, 2012, 08:17 AM   #39
Sparks1957
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Not having a correct grip yet, and not understanding about focusing on the front sight
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Old October 2, 2012, 08:45 AM   #40
tomrkba
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1) Drinking soda up to a few hours before the match.
2) Shooting too fast/getting impatient.
3) Failing to do mental prep.
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Old October 2, 2012, 09:04 AM   #41
StainlessSteel215
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Great posts guys...lotta overlap on the same issues I see. Tom that last post was interesting about mental "prep".

I dont think Ive ever taken the time after setting the targets, unboxing ammo and loading the mags.....to just focus for a few minutes and go through all the steps mentally. I usually just fire off a couple of prelim rounds to get loose....then by the 3rd or 4th shot I go through all my steps one at a time.
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Old October 5, 2012, 01:30 PM   #42
satchel
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Leaving my finger inside the trigger guard when I didn't intend to shoot. I darned near blew my foot off with that stupid stunt.
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Old October 5, 2012, 01:38 PM   #43
Rick F
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Still a beginner . . .

But I noticed the following really help.

-Make sure to lower my head like a turtle pushing his neck into his shell. Not sure if this is correct, but it helps me to have proper alignment with my sights.

-When gripping my pistols, I find I shoot more accurately if I push my palms fairly hard into each otheron the backstrap area. Again, not sure if this is correct or not, but it helps me.
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Old October 5, 2012, 07:18 PM   #44
Boatme98
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Great post.
I've seen lots of things that I did, and some I still do, dang it.
When I started shooting (pistols), I read everything I could find. Libraries, used bookstores, and even gun rags (they used to actually have lots of usefull info., not just tac/ninja accessory articles). I think the 2 best pieces of advice were: 1. Breath control, and 2. Front sight.
I remember it took me forever to get the take a breath and partially exhale bit.
Now it's just natural.
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Old October 5, 2012, 08:01 PM   #45
1Hobie
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A different view

A different perspective. Gun handling discipline is an important part of the game. However, target shooting is..

Target shooting. As in an informal plinking or training session? Or is it a NRA Bullseye competition per se? Not picking a nit but......

Bad things.

Shooting things that could send the round back at me(and did). Not making sure the gun was safe(once and it scared the stuffing out of me). Learning that even though I had what seemed a safe back stop, rounds could still skip over the hill. Believing that my new found shooting buddy really is a menace to society and shouldn't even be allowed to be around guns.

Bullseye comp. Stepping forward on the firing line before it's declared safe.
Cross firing on someone else's target. Not being ready when "ready on the right....." is being called. etc.

I learned, no harm to anything, thank a deity, and went on to a safe fulfilling experience with my family.

Hobie
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Old October 5, 2012, 10:57 PM   #46
Stevie-Ray
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Loose collar and 10mm.

Drinking coffee before.
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Old October 6, 2012, 06:31 AM   #47
MarkDozier
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Hold the phone. your saying you don;t drink coffee before you shoot. Are you a commie or just a nut case.
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Old October 6, 2012, 06:33 AM   #48
MarkDozier
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Hold the phone. your saying you don;t drink coffee before you shoot. Are you a commie or just a nut case.
i thin my worst habit was not listenung
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Old October 6, 2012, 12:39 PM   #49
mrt949
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Trying too many diferent types of firearms in one day . Thinkng you are expert at everyting when you are a new shooter . Now I only take one type at a time. Lessons learned over the years.

Last edited by mrt949; October 6, 2012 at 02:58 PM.
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Old October 6, 2012, 12:44 PM   #50
Dragline45
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As others already mentioned, for me it was peeking at the target in between shots. It's like golfing and pulling your head up as you swing to see where it goes, it never turns out good. I practiced and still do a whole lot with a .22 to instill good shooting habits and work on fundamentals.

As for people saying don't drink coffee before you shoot, I often drink coffee before and during some of my shooting sessions and see no ill effects compared to when I don't drink any. I can also down coffee and fall asleep so caffeine doesn't really have a big effect on me.
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