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Old September 28, 2012, 09:04 PM   #1
Rupskin
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Is it OK to buy a floor model gun and pay NIB price?

Hi,

First ever post on the firing line forums, but have been browsing the threads for months now. I came across a situation today at my local gun shop, and wasn't sure what to do in this particular scenario.
I having been eying up the Sig Sauer P220 Match Elite for quite some time now, and went to my LGS to pick one up. They aren't particularly common P220's, but I called ahead and they verified that they had one NIB, so I asked them to hold it for me until I got off of work that day. It was $1200 and the guy would not budge off of that price whatsoever. I told him that I would buy the gun, figuring that it would be tough to find another one.
After checking inventory he said that they didn't have one NIB, only what was on the floor. I was a little angry that the guy said they had 1 NIB, when in reality he didn't check, but whatever no biggie. He said I could take the floor model though, so I looked over the P220 with careful detail, I didn't see anything really wrong with the finish or anything, but the slide release was incredibly hard to depress. I'm not sure if that's normal or not, since I only have handled a half dozen or so pistols. I asked if they could take $75-100 off the price of the gun since it's a floor model which has been handled and dry fired before. Again, they wouldn't budge off of $1200.

My multi-part question is....
1) Is it normal for the floor model to be considered NIB?
2) Should one assume that the price of a floor model be discounted from NIB price?
3) If I did purchase this firearm, is a really tight slide release normal when new? Was curious on this too
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Old September 28, 2012, 09:17 PM   #2
stumper1300
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As long as it has not been fired by anyone but the factory it will be considered NIB. You will see " used" guns that have never been fired advertised as NIB.


It will be difficult to get any discount without visible damage.especially on a somewhat rare gun.

As far as the slide release.remove the magazine and it will be easier. It will be easier with a loaded mag or no mag. The pressure of the mag spring and follower make the release difficult to operate.
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Old September 28, 2012, 09:17 PM   #3
geetarman
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Quote:

My multi-part question is....
1) Is it normal for the floor model to be considered NIB?
2) Should one assume that the price of a floor model be discounted from NIB price?
3) If I did purchase this firearm, is a really tight slide release normal when new? Was curious on this too
1) Unless the gun is beat up, yes. Most hard to find guns are not on display for long and most gun shops are not going to get multiple copies. Same with scopes. They may or may not have one that has not been on display.

2) No. If gun shows excessive signs of handling. . .you might get a break.

3) If you are trying to release slide without taking the pressure off the slide stop, yes.

Does the slide stop move easily with the slide closed?
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Old September 28, 2012, 09:23 PM   #4
Rupskin
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Yes, the slide stop moves freely up and down when the slide is closed. I guess I wasn't used to it, since the few guns I have I'm able to hit the slide release relatively easily w/o much pressure when I don't have a magazine in.
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Old September 28, 2012, 09:41 PM   #5
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For me it really depends on what shop we are talking about. A big box retailer is going to have a ton of people handling a gun which is in their case. They have others in the back which get sold before as the one on display is handled, dry fired, hammer dropped on an empty chamber, slide dropped on an empty chamber etc.... When this is the case i would only buy at a discount.

In a small shop where the gun in the case is the only one in stock I am more inclined to buy the one in the case because as others have said it does not stay there long enough to be abused.

Technically NIB is any gun which has not been shot since it let the factory and has not been transferred to a individual owner.

I have to ask where you releasing the slide using the slide lock on an empty chamber?
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Old September 28, 2012, 09:42 PM   #6
orionengnr
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Welcome to the forum.

To try to answer your question, only you can answer that. But we might be able to help you establish some parameters...
Consider:

Is this the only example of this pistol available in your area?
(If so, the dealer is at a distinct advantage).

How badly do you want it?
(See above).

If it were me, and providing this is not a hard-to find, limited issue model, I would keep my eyes and my options open. The internet affords you a lot of research options.

Good luck, and best regards, Rich
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Old September 28, 2012, 09:50 PM   #7
Sgt Pepper
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The profit margins are so low on guns, the price really never goes down unless there is some truly visible handling wear or major blemish. Most folks won't care or even give these matters much, if any, thought. Stores may be more likely to throw in an extra of some kind rather than drop the gun price.
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Old September 28, 2012, 10:10 PM   #8
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If no damage to the gun, why not buy it? I've bought more than one "display" model if not damaged, if it was a model I wanted.
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Old September 28, 2012, 10:10 PM   #9
Rupskin
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Thanks for all the input, was really just trying to get a feel for what NIB constitutes in the gun market. I have purchased 2 pistols in the past, and both came from the back with factory wrappings etc, so I just needed clarification. I was under the impression that a discount was given, from any other "open box" type scenario. I guess in the case of guns, a few dry firings, and minor handling is nothing in terms of the life of the pistol. I will more than likely purchase the P220 match elite tomorrow, just needed some reassurance stating that a discount of some kind wasn't warranted. It's a beautiful gun with a sweet trigger, and just feels plain good in my hand.
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Old September 28, 2012, 10:12 PM   #10
Sgt Pepper
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One other thing: if you are buying to shoot or carry, then handling is irrelevant, but if you are buying to collect, then it may be completely relevant.
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Old September 28, 2012, 11:42 PM   #11
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Regarding the slide stop issue:

When most people are handling firearms, they drop the magazine before locking the slide to the rear. However, at many gun shops they just check the chamber before handing the gun to a customer; they leave the empty magazine in the weapon. If the customer ends up locking the slide to the rear, they are often surprised by the amount of pressure it takes to press the slide release with an empty magazine inserted.
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Old September 29, 2012, 06:04 AM   #12
Patrice
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Floor model? Quite frequently, what one sees in the display case is the only gun of that type/model the outfit has in stock. A gun shop, even a big-box store with a large firearms sections may not have 15 or 20 guns in the back that match the floor model. S0000, quite frequently what one gets at the LGS, Gun-show, or the big-box store is what one sees--i.e., unless one wants the dealer to order the desired gun from their distributor (which of course can take a verrry long time).
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Old September 29, 2012, 06:19 AM   #13
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A lot of shops will only have one example of a particular gun and that will be on display as their "floor model". So long as there is no damage to the gun like scratches or scraps, I would expect it to be sold as a new gun.
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Old September 29, 2012, 04:00 PM   #14
tekarra
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Hello Rupskin and welcome to the forum.
Several times I have been offered a discount on a floor model firearm. However, if it is not marred, it is a new firearm. If you are going to shoot it a lot, then it will not make any difference.
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Old September 30, 2012, 07:37 AM   #15
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I usually ask them to give me a break on a floor model. Most gun stores will oblige.
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Old September 30, 2012, 08:55 AM   #16
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I always consider a gun that has never been fired or registered to be NIB. I just look the gun over for signs of wear or mishandling.
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Old September 30, 2012, 09:18 AM   #17
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Well , the MSRP is over $ 1350.00 for the P220 Match Elite so it is discounted a bit already and yes , I've been to places asking near the full MSRP value on SIG's ! From what I've seen they are not easy to find in stock either...I guess it boils down to how patient or how badly you want one !
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Old September 30, 2012, 09:23 AM   #18
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Not unusual to see that. I've bought new display guns when a shop has no other ones in stock and have paid NIB prices on almost all of them. Do a good job of checking the gun over, if there are no marks on it and it functions fine, buy it. You'll be getting the full warranty so there should be no problem.
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Old September 30, 2012, 09:41 AM   #19
Remington74
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Quote:
Stores may be more likely to throw in an extra of some kind rather than drop the gun price.
I have bought most of my guns, both new and used, at small local gun shops. As a result they don't usually have extra examples in there inventory, what you see is what they have.

That said, in dickering on the price I am more likely to get an extra something or two thrown into the deal than any signifficant reduction on the asking price.

I've come away from some deals with a couple of extra mags that were list price more than what I could expect the dealer to drop his asking price on the gun.

And yes, I consider an unfired, never transferred gun in the display case to be NIB.
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Old September 30, 2012, 07:32 PM   #20
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About half of the "new" guns I have bought have been the one on the display shelf. They were not collector pieces, so, it didn't bother me. Not a lot of mark up on used guns, so, I don't bother to haggle with them. Used is a different story, though.

A couple of months ago I stopped by one of the local shops and noticed a RIA 1911 in .38 Super. It was odd because very few shops stock anything in .38 Super. It was beat to heck even though it was new. The price was $385, which I didn't think was bad considering. It didn't sell, so, they moved it to the used shelf with a price of $439. It's still beat to heck and it still hasn't sold.
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Old September 30, 2012, 07:43 PM   #21
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Supply and demand. He has one, you can't find one elsewhere, so...... pay up or walk away are the choices. As long as there's no damage, and I assume you're going to shoot it, it does have a manufacturer's warranty. It's scarce, so even if it had a slight scratch, he still might be able to get full retail for it. Your decision. How bad do you want it?
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Old September 30, 2012, 08:37 PM   #22
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New in box means new, unfired. Not inordinately messed with by customers. This is why some shops are a bit picky about people looking at guns, if you want to play and are not a buyer. Esp with higher dollar guns.

Thinking that the guns in the display case are not new in box makes little sense. By that logic all the rolexes in my buddies shop (he is a rolex dealer) are used.
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Old October 4, 2012, 05:41 PM   #23
cookie5
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I usually do not need any pistol when sold at list price.
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Old October 7, 2012, 11:28 AM   #24
mitchntx
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After lusting after a Sig 1911 at a Cabela's and finding out the fondle unit was the only one left in stock, I asked the sales dood if they would discount the gun $5 for each time had been dry-fired.

He looked at me like I was an idiot.

Quality weapons are a lot more rugged than the everage Joe handles them. Careful manipulation of a weapon and it's systems is just part of the game.

I bought the Nightmare, BTW ...
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Old October 7, 2012, 06:09 PM   #25
James K
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Guns aren't handled like appliances. Most average gun shops don't have "floor samples" to look at and then huge warehouses with stacks of new guns to be sold to the customer. Generally, what is in the case or on the rack is what you get. Of course, you can order a gun "on the net", in which case you won't even get to see it or handle it until it arrives and the seller is on permanent vacation in Aruba.

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