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Old September 25, 2012, 12:31 PM   #1
TheRaskalKing
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How do YOU grip the gun?

My buddy and I got into a semi-heated discussion (as we always do) about different grip styles. I use the straight thumbs "combat" grip (http://www.handgunsmag.com/2010/09/2...ombatg_100306/) and get good results with it. He uses the cross thumbs and keeps his weak hand index finger on the front of the trigger guard. This seems very odd to me, but he shoots as well as I do with it.

This got me thinking- I thought the straight thumbs method was kind of a universal standard among well versed handgunners, but maybe not? I know conventional wisdom says that if you find something that works, run with it, and that there is not one solution that's always right for everybody. What do you all use?
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Old September 25, 2012, 12:40 PM   #2
TunnelRat
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I use the thumbs forward, or "combat" grip as you put it. I actually used to do what your friend does. After trying thumbs forward a few times it seemed like it gave me more surface area of contact with the firearm so I went with that. Took a good month to change grips but it's old habit now. I have a buddy that still uses that grip and he shoots well with it, though secretly I think he would do even better with thumbs forward .

Unless someone is holding a firearm in a way that could injure themselves, i.e. thumb behind the slide, I tend to leave them alone. Not worth arguing about.

Edit: As a note some people use the thumb over grip because of what firearm they started learning with. For me I learned on a revolver, where a thumbs forward grip is not the best idea.
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Old September 25, 2012, 12:45 PM   #3
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Some instructors teach a thumb low, closer to fist hold, based on the theory that it is stronger in the event of a retention scenario.

I don't find that thumb position makes much difference for me, in terms of hitting the target. I find a consistent, high grip (IE web of hand right up to the top of the backstrap) to be much more important.

Edit: I do find that thumb positions which work with some guns, do not work with others. I have long fingers and thumbs, and in some cases a high thumb can cause problems with safeties and slide stops.
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Old September 25, 2012, 12:48 PM   #4
j3ffr0
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i use the OP's grip decent size semi-autos. i use OP buddy's grip on revolvers (thumbs forward will not work) i use something in between on my lcp
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Old September 25, 2012, 05:12 PM   #5
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Grip style is a personal issue. I use the thumbs forward style with my semi-autos....but I vary my grip with revolvers, occasionally using the "teacup and saucer" style, but most often a similar style to that used with my semi-autos.

Whatever WORKS for the individual and allows him/her to shoot his BEST - is the "correct" grip - regardless of what anyone says.
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Old September 25, 2012, 05:26 PM   #6
Dashunde
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For me it entirely depends on the gun in hand.

My main pistols are Glock 21 & 27, Kahr PM9, LCP, Buckmark, 1911... I grip them all differently.

But yea, both thumbs forward'ish for all of them I suppose.
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Old September 25, 2012, 05:26 PM   #7
walts
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A bit unconventional but I use the combat grip, thumbs forward, but not an arched left wrist. Instead I have my left arm bowed down a bit with my support hand (left) fingers pressing back against the gun/right hand fingers and putting pressure into my right arm which is extended straight out. This feels really comfortable and eliminates any shake...just a solid/consistent way for me to hold a pistol.
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Old September 25, 2012, 06:26 PM   #8
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRascalKing
My buddy and I got into a semi-heated discussion (as we always do) about different grip styles. I use the straight thumbs "combat" grip
IMHO, that's not so much a "combat" grip as it is a "competition" grip. I prefer to hold the pistol exactly the same whether I'm shooting it one-handed or with a support hand, and whether I'm shooting a semi-auto or a revolver. There's no way that thumbs-forward grip works with one hand, so (again, IMHO) it's useless as a "combat" grip because in combat you may well be shooting with one hand. So I use what some people call a "revolver" grip, even when shooting semi-auto's instead of revolvers.

Use what works for you. The important thing is to be able to hit what you're aiming at. Life's too short to be arguing about where your thumbs go when shooting.
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Old September 25, 2012, 06:28 PM   #9
Ozzieman
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Thumbs crossed on all types.
I get a better, stronger grip. The other reason that I won’t use the thumb up is with some guns it covers some of the target aria. With my commander type Kimber the top of the thumb is equal to the top of the sights with the thumb up. Whether it makes much difference I don’t know but I don’t want any of the aria in front of the gun covered by my thumb.
But the big thing is, it’s not what your friend says or us, it’s what works best for you.
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Old September 25, 2012, 06:56 PM   #10
Edward429451
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Two thumbs forward is what works for me. I showed a fair amount of increase in accuracy when I first tried this grip, it was like, wow. I grew up shooting the 45 with thumbs down, locked in, because it was how my Dad taught me to shoot it. I encourage everyone to try different grips for fun, you might be pleasantly surprised.
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Old September 25, 2012, 07:48 PM   #11
thedudeabides
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I naturally assumed the combat grip, it made me feel better that some experts were using it as well... but there's only so many ways you can properly hold a semiautomatic.
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Old September 25, 2012, 07:58 PM   #12
MLeake
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walts, your "unconventional" grip sounds very much like a Chapman.
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Old September 25, 2012, 08:07 PM   #13
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I use a 'thumbs forward' grip.

I did an instructional how-to video that some of the new shooters here may find helpful as I demonstrate why gripping the semi-auto using these principles works for recoil management. There are other 'correct' or 'proper' ways to do it but having the hand high in the tang and maximizing surface area contact work---no matter what method/grip you use to achieve that.

How to properly grip a semi-auto instructional video

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Old September 25, 2012, 08:07 PM   #14
TunnelRat
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Quote:
There's no way that thumbs-forward grip works with one hand, so (again, IMHO) it's useless as a "combat" grip because in combat you may well be shooting with one hand.
Huh?
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Old September 25, 2012, 09:49 PM   #15
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TunnelRat
Quote:
There's no way that thumbs-forward grip works with one hand, so (again, IMHO) it's useless as a "combat" grip because in combat you may well be shooting with one hand.
Huh?
What's hard to understand?

Take your basic, thumbs-forward grip ... like this:



Now remove the support hand and try to shoot the gun accurately without shifting the strong hand's grip on the gun.
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Old September 25, 2012, 10:16 PM   #16
MP9
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good video..

many people use the "combat grip" and I have seen people using the cross thumbs and can shoot well at range at slow fire and some few others at some competition...average shooter.

but the thing is, what do you call to shoot well? static at the range, slow fire? defensive shooting? competition?

or were you 2 shooting pretty fast, calling each shoot? because the problem with some of those no commons grips is to track the sight up and down, calling each shoot. sometimes those grips dont bring the front sight at the center of the sight picture and you have to adjust your grip or align the front sight again... but it is usually shooting fast, more for competition where you need a good grip control for recoil/muzzle flip and fast sight acquisition...
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Old September 25, 2012, 11:51 PM   #17
TunnelRat
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Quote:
Now remove the support hand and try to shoot the gun accurately without shifting the strong hand's grip on the gun
Well my strong hand is flush against the back of the grip and the extension off the frame prevents my hand from raising any higher than if I was holding it one handed. To shoot one handed I just lower the strong thumb. So what is hard for me to understand is how shifting my strong thumb half an inch makes thumbs forward unfit for "combat". I shoot one handed all the time and haven't had an issue yet.
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Old September 26, 2012, 12:31 AM   #18
RBid
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I use thumbs forward. I also have zero trouble transitioning to single hand shooting. Sliding the strong thumb down is not a challenge.
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Old September 26, 2012, 09:04 AM   #19
MLeake
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My thumbs forward grip was causing FTRB issues due to my thumb rubbing on the slide (as evidenced by streaks on the bottom of the slide). Low thumb was causing problems with inadvertent flicking of the extended safety to safe while shooting strings. (Long thumbs can cause problems, just like short ones, only different...)

Had Bob Hunter convert the extended safety on my Baer to something closer to MilSpec, and kept the low thumb. My UTC now runs like the Swiss watch other people had described the UTC as being before I bought it.

This is not a knock on the Baer, it is simply a pointer that individual anatomy and physiology can play a big part in ideal grip, and in equipment setup.
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Old September 26, 2012, 10:49 AM   #20
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not sure what my grip is called. weak hand thumb wrapped around the middle finger of the strong hand and the rest of the weak hand fingers wrapped around the bottom 2 fingers of strong hand. i use this grip for revolvers and semi's.
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Old September 26, 2012, 11:33 AM   #21
loose_holster_dan
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mine looks like the one in your link, except that my strong hand thumb rides much farther forward. the tip is right at the back of my offhand thumb fingernail.

i can remove my offhand, and all i have to do is let my thumb drop down onto the frame since the offhand isn't there to support it anymore. notice how the picture in his link greatly differs from the pic attached by Aguila Blanca. in Aguila Blanca's picture, the off hand thumb is almost at the end of the frame of a government size 1911. that would be in front of the muzzle of many compact guns.
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Old September 26, 2012, 12:05 PM   #22
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Like almost everyone else here, I use a high hold, thumbs forward combat style grip on my semi autos. I grip high on revolvers, too, but it seems a bit more akward. It seems to give me better results. I sometimes shoot arms bent at the range (my eyes are pretty bad so it's nice to pull it in closer) but I would probably point shoot with arms extended in duress.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:39 PM   #23
KyJim
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I also use the high, thumbs forward hold but different grips can work for different people. Years ago, I tried to shoot with the "push-pull" method and it just didn't work for me.
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Old September 26, 2012, 02:01 PM   #24
Aguila Blanca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TunnelRat
Well my strong hand is flush against the back of the grip and the extension off the frame prevents my hand from raising any higher than if I was holding it one handed. To shoot one handed I just lower the strong thumb.
So to shoot one-handed you change your grip.

If that works for you, that works for you. Personally, I prefer to use one grip that works for semi-autos and revolvers, one hand or two hands.
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Old September 26, 2012, 02:12 PM   #25
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVhTA-n0ivE

Like this as the article stated straight thumbed method.
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